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  • Unknown chuck/tool holder use

    These tool holders came in a box of stuff with my little South Bend lathe years ago. The markings say Standard No. 0 Improved and Standard No. 0 Improved Special. I assume they were made by the Standard Tool Company of Cleveland, Ohio. The jaws on one forms a square or rectangle, and the other a hex. Neither fit the tapers on my lathe. Were these simply drill chucks or did they have some other purpose? Honestly my only interest is that they were made in Cleveland just like me.

    Tom

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    Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

  • #2
    Drill chuck.

    NEXT!

    -Doozer
    DZER

    Comment


    • #3
      Tap holder?

      Comment


      • #4
        2-jaw drill chuck. They used to be common.
        It's all mind over matter.
        If you don't mind, it don't matter.

        Comment


        • #5
          I've got a 1930 Buck and Hickman (tool suppliers) catalogue of 1930 which shows Standard (Improved Pattern) and Positive Drive chucks looking very like yours.

          The text says'Standard chucks have no projecting jaws and the plate prevents larger work than the chuck is designed for being used. They are very powerful and guaranteed to hold true and not injure the shanks of the drills. The jaws are guided by 3 strong gibs. The patented improvements in the Positive Drive chuck consists in a set of adjustable positive drive jaws for holding taps, drills and other tools. The positive driving section of these jaws adjusts with the friction or centring jaws so that the fastening of the tool is done in one operation'

          They were available in several different sizes, from a No.41 holding 0 -1/4" up to No.45 holding 0 - 1", for the Improved Pattern, and No.50 holding 0 - 3/8" up to No.53 holding 0 -1" for the Positive Drive pattern.

          Prices (in 1930) ranged from 33/4d for a no. 41 up to 72/11d for a No.45, and 54/2d for a No.50 up to 87/6d for a number 53. Translating from UK pre-decimal currency, and assuming an exchange rate of 4$ to the Β£stg, that would make a No. 53 around $17.50, so not cheap.

          The catalogue illustration shows the Positive Drive chuck being used to hold a tap.

          In the same catalogue are similar chucks by Westcott (Little Giant), Hartford, Pratt, Union and Horton.

          None of them seem to have been supplied with arbors, available arbors elsewhere in the catalogue cover Morse, Jarno and B&S, as you would expect.

          By 1958, the only chuck of this type was a Swedish made 'Luna', the Jacobs type having come into prominence.
          'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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          • #6
            I have one of those, pretty much identical, in the "curiosities" collection. Mine has, IIRC, an MT2. But, now that you mention it, the taper may be a B&S taper, some are pretty similar between those and you may not notice a difference until you try to fit them in the wrong taper socket.
            CNC machines only go through the motions.

            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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            • #7
              Those died out as the Jacobs style chucks became more popular. And from my reading B&S tapers used to be as or more popular than Morse tapers at around that time. So yeah, some interesting bits of mechanical history you got there.
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

              Comment


              • #8
                Yep. 2-Jaw drill chuck. The #0 has a 0 to 3/8" capacity and originally cost $6.50. You can find it here:

                http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=26234


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                • #9
                  Thanks for all the great info. Yep, the arbor screwed right off one of them. It's 5/8-16 which which seems fairly common. Might just pick a Morse arbor for the lathe quill for those tapping tasks.

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                  Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                    Drill chuck.

                    NEXT!

                    -Doozer
                    Hey Doozer when are we going to see that Rockford planer making some damn chips? πŸ˜‰

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I need to make some furniture for it first.
                      So far I made 1 tee nut and fixed the sprag
                      in the power feed, made a secondary oil drain
                      for the power feed gear case, and made my lamp.
                      I got some more furniture ideas from Rees Achenson.

                      -D
                      Last edited by Doozer; 01-24-2023, 04:16 PM.
                      DZER

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                        I need to make some furniture for it first.
                        So far I made 1 tee nut and fixed the sprag
                        in the power feed, made a secondary oil drain
                        for the power feed gear case, and made my lamp.
                        I got some more furniture ideas from Rees Achenson.

                        -D
                        Well quit fooling around with fire trucks and get with the program, we ain't gonna live forever you know! πŸ˜‰

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I found one of those chucks amongst a legacy that the museum was given. I even went as far as to buy an arbor for it, but it had about 0.010" tir wobble and has been consigned to the junk bin. The name on it is Crown.

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                          • #14
                            Neat old tool.. When I saw the flat face in low res. picture I thought it was like my walstrom chuck. But no. Walstrom is an odd ball chuck also. It has some knurled "barrel" looking jaws, three of them. Not sure how good they are for holding, never used it. I have some with regular jaws and a tapered face that do work well. JR

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by flathead4 View Post
                              Thanks for all the great info. Yep, the arbor screwed right off one of them. It's 5/8-16 which which seems fairly common. Might just pick a Morse arbor for the lathe quill for those tapping tasks.

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                              Flathead4: Not sure, but the shank shown looks to be a B & S taper, shown in post 9. Its been a long time since I used one. The shank shown in post 14 may be a Morse taper. My eyes are over 80 years old, so I may be wrong. I was wrong once, I think.
                              Sarge41

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