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Removing a drill chuck arbor

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  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by DR View Post
    In years past and maybe still Jacobs instructions for removing arbors in cases like this was to cross drill the arbor, insert cross pin, then use wedges. Always worked for me. The arbor is still usable.

    Something else, Jacobs arbors were usually soft. Low cost import arbors many times are heat treated. Not sure why.

    On edit: here's a link to Jacobs recommended way to remove arbors. I don't get all this business about taking chucks apart.

    http://www.jacobschuck.com/uploads/u...0204146153.pdf
    In this particular case, there was virtually no shoulder on the arbor against which to use wedges like that. There was only a shallow radiused groove barely 0.050" deep. The tail of the arbor, being a Morse taper, got smaller from there. Beyond that I did not happen to have a pair of those wedges. Yes, clearly I could have made a pair. As it was, it honestly took less time to disassemble the chuck and push the arbor out than it took to read about how to do it. I was actually surprised how simple and easy it was.

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  • jwmelvin
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Q? Other than greasing the balls,
    should you lubricate ANYTHING else?
    The link you included does not mention
    lubricating anything.
    Yes, that link, to Royal's page on rebuilding and replacement parts, simply says not to lubricate the screw.

    Albrecht's German site has a PDF with more, which states:
    "-Put a lot of grease (water and heat resistant) on the balls, only a little grease on the guides. Take care not to put grease on the thread between spindle 2 and body 4. These surfaces have to be clean and dry in order to secure the function of the chuck. - Don’t grease the matching guides of shell 3 and jaw guide 1 so the air can escape during assembly."

    I'm not purporting to know, I've just read not to grease the screw before (like in this popular guide), and figured it was worth mentioning.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    I mentioned earlier that I could not live with the idea of zero oil as in freshly degreased. So I applied a light coating then rubbed most of it off with a paper towel. On two chucks that were super lightly oiled where meant to be dry they are working fine. The other is still as it came from the box and works fine too. I can't detect any difference between the three of them. And they all work well enough that I can drive S&D drills with them.

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  • Doozer
    replied
    I have always kept the hood and jaws dry.
    Putting grease on the screw never seemed
    to make the chuck self loosen, but maybe
    you are right to keep it dry too.

    Q? Other than greasing the balls,
    should you lubricate ANYTHING else?
    The link you included does not mention
    lubricating anything.

    -D

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    Last edited by Doozer; 02-06-2023, 03:28 PM.

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  • jwmelvin
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Only grease the screw. ... Only grease
    the screw and the balls.
    Albrecht says "Take care not to put grease on the thread between spindle 2 and body 4. These surfaces have to be clean and dry in order to secure the function of the chuck." (Spindle 2 is the male screw; body 4 is the female thread). Other documents say "Caution – do not lubricate acme thread on body/spindle assembly."

    e.g. here
    Last edited by jwmelvin; 02-06-2023, 02:42 PM.

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  • DR
    replied
    In years past and maybe still Jacobs instructions for removing arbors in cases like this was to cross drill the arbor, insert cross pin, then use wedges. Always worked for me. The arbor is still usable.

    Something else, Jacobs arbors were usually soft. Low cost import arbors many times are heat treated. Not sure why.

    On edit: here's a link to Jacobs recommended way to remove arbors. I don't get all this business about taking chucks apart.

    Last edited by DR; 02-04-2023, 05:35 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post

    Alan, the schmoo in the chuck is way over the top. It sure does need a cleaning. But when you put it back together note that the friction cone surface inside the hood is by rights supposed to be dry. Same with the mating surfaces on the jaws.
    No question! It was obvious as soon as I got the thing apart, the stuff was everywhere in there. It looked a lot like that cosmoline-like goop that they smear on tools to prevent rusting during shipping. It was semi-hardened and made the chuck very stiff in operation.

    I cleaned it all out with some lacquer thinner and as Doozer suggested, put just enough grease to get a light coat in the screw threads and just enough on the bearing balls that they were sticky enough to stay on place for assembly. The thing opens and closes easily and smoothly now, much nicer than before.

    I put in the new arbor, a straight 3/4" one so I can use this in my milling machine. I have not tried to check runout, but again this was a pretty inexpensive chuck so while you do get luck on occasion my expectations aren't that high.

    I really appreciate all of the input.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Only grease the screw. DO NOT grease the inside of the hood
    or the outside of the jaws. If you grease it, it will NOT grab a
    drill bit. It will be self tightening and self loosening!
    Be very sparing with grease and no oil. Only grease
    the screw and the balls.

    -Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • old mart
    replied
    I bought a 20mm, 3/4" manual chuck and an R8 arbor for the rock bottom price of £36 and was pleased to find that it already had a 1/2" hole through the body. And doubly pleased when it ran 0.001" tir with 3 different size test bars in it. Even the Chinese get things right if they want to.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    Oh God...Doozer was right. We will never hear the end of it! There is a first for everything I guess.
    I KNOW ! ! ! ! We'll have to put up with him strutting around all day now ! ! !

    Alan, the schmoo in the chuck is way over the top. It sure does need a cleaning. But when you put it back together note that the friction cone surface inside the hood is by rights supposed to be dry. Same with the mating surfaces on the jaws.

    When I did mine a few years ago I could not stand the idea of dry steel in my slightly rust prone shop. So I used the thinnest wipe I could of fairly thin oil. As in applied then wiped off with a paper towel moderately well. It's still very smooth in operation some 5 years later so no rust and not enough oil to make it not tighten.

    Leave a comment:


  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by Noitoen View Post
    Dipping the arbor in liquid Nitrogen just short of touching the chuck would have worked without disassembly but then you would't have the opportunity to clean and lubricate it's guts
    I expect that would indeed have worked as well. While I had not thought to try that, I could have as I have access to lots of LN2 where I work. Maybe next time!

    And you are correct, it would have not given me the opportunity to clean out the guts. While it was not awfully dirty inside, the original grease was thickened, sticky, and made the thing pretty stiff to operate. I expect it will be much nicer to use once I re-lubricate it and get it back together. It was long overdue for a clean out I guess.

    Leave a comment:


  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    Oh God...Doozer was right. We will never hear the end of it! There is a first for everything I guess.
    Wow, tough crowd here!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Oh God...Doozer was right. We will never hear the end of it! There is a first for everything I guess.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noitoen
    replied
    Dipping the arbor in liquid Nitrogen just short of touching the chuck would have worked without disassembly but then you would't have the opportunity to clean and lubricate it's guts

    Leave a comment:


  • alanganes
    replied
    The arbor isn’t straight, is a 2MT, I think the angle and camera make it look straight. See the photo below after it was removed.

    Anyhow how it looks like Doozer gets the prize today for first right answer.

    After reading over that description of disassembling one of these I took a run at mine. This one is an Asian import I got quite a few years ago. Turns out it comes apart just a bit differently than the Albrecht but close enough to figure out.

    The collar and hood came off without much trouble. The hood popped loose with just a light tap on an ill-fitting pin spanner that I made for a collet setup on my Sheldon lathe. Once the jaws came out, screwing out the spindle didn’t push the jaw guide out. That was held in with the black threaded “base plate” piece. I clamped the jaw guide in some aluminum vee blocks and was able to tap the base plate around with a punch in the divots you can see and it unscrewed under figer power after about a quarter turn. . Then the thing came apart. I didn’t drop any ball bearings. After that, there was indeed a gaping hole through which I was able to press the arbor out.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	C63DC799-7C88-4D1D-80FA-BA8A3ED035D3.jpg Views:	0 Size:	3.03 MB ID:	2034744


    Click image for larger version  Name:	F9F281EF-AC78-4B6A-B9CB-1DE6F6675576.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.98 MB ID:	2034746

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    Last edited by alanganes; 02-02-2023, 09:17 PM.

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