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making crock pot lid from Lexan?

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  • making crock pot lid from Lexan?

    Mom's plastic lid for her crock pot (like a coffee pot only for long-term cooking stews and such) broke and I am thinking about using some scrap Lexan that I have laying around to make a disk to replace the lid. She called the company and they don't make replacement lids for it anymore. This would have hot food right below it for hours on end. Would it hold up and is there any problem with off-gassing of plastic vapors into the food? At what temperature would it melt? Thanks--Mike.

  • #2
    Hi Mike,

    I believe the maximum operating temp for Lexan is 180آ؛ F. I would think that rating is much too low for such an application. I realize the actual temperature will likely be lower than that, but you typically want component specs to exceed actual operating conditions by a good margin.
    Leigh
    The entire content of this post is copyright by, and is the sole property of, the author. No assignment
    of title nor right of publication shall ensue from presentation of this material on any computer site.

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    • #3
      I wouldn't think a crock pot gets hotter than about 250* so it should work.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Leigh
        I believe the maximum operating temp for Lexan is 180آ؛ F. I would think that rating is much too low for such an application.
        I'm probably wrong but I thought it was closer to 300+. ??? Or is that the melting point?

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        • #5
          Lexan can and will sag and gas off when heated. Just a idea... why not make a ceramic or earthware replacement with a nice safe glaze. I'm sure you could find a pottery place that would let you make it or make one for you. Or make a stainless lid.
          Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

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          • #6
            TG of lexan is around 150C, aka, 300 deg F.

            It will start to sag around 140, you should be fine.

            If not, you'll just have to make one out of acrylic...that's what they are generally made of anyway.

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            • #7
              Not sure I would want Lexan (polycarbonate) around cooking food. It's made of bisphenol A and phosgene. Bisphenol A is a synthetic estrogen and phosgene is a lethal compound.

              About bisphenol A:

              More than 100 studies have explored the bioactivity of bisphenol A leachates from polycarbonates. Bisphenol A appeared to be released from polycarbonate animal cages into water at room temperature and that it may have been responsible for enlargement of the reproductive organs of female mice.[1]
              An analysis of the literature on bisphenol A leachate low-dose effects by vom Saal and Hughes published in August 2005 seems to have found a suggestive correlation between the source of funding and the conclusion drawn. Industry funded studies tend to find no significant effects while government funded studies tend to find significant effects.[
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bisphenol_A
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                I think I'd try to find a replacement glass lid someplace -- if nothing turned up, maybe make one out of aluminum. But I think I'd avoid plastics.
                ----------
                Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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                • #9
                  I've worked a little with Lexan, and I consider it to be pretty low temp stuff. My experience was that, when it gets hot, first it get's a "foamy" texture. (Trapped water in the plastic, IIRC, making lots of bubbles in the material.) It then flows pretty slowly, but flow it does. Imagine a thick, hot, sticky, smelly, foamy film half an inch thick as a skin on top of your stew.

                  You might try browsing yard sales, thrift stores - that kind of thing. You'll find the perfect match just after you give up and fabricate one from aluminum.

                  -Mark
                  The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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                  • #10
                    The ceramic idea is interesting since I know a lady that has a pot shop and kiln. What are plastic pop bottles made from? Is that going to leach into the soda pop and kill us too? Thanks--Mike.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mikem
                      What are plastic pop bottles made from?
                      PET - Polyethylene terephthalate. Won't kill you any more than eating raw steak or living in cities

                      Peter

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mikem
                        What are plastic pop bottles made from? Is that going to leach into the soda pop and kill us too?
                        It seems like every so often there is another study that shows that this or that cause cancer, memory loss, premature aging, reproductive unproductiveness, or whatever.

                        Unless it is an unappropriate material, I don't think that plastics around foods are a concern until they are heated, or start breaking down.

                        If nothing else in this world kills us, the old clock on the wall will.
                        Why buy it for $2 when you can make it for $20

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                        • #13
                          I like the SS or ceramic idea. If you use ceramic, make sure it doesn't contain lead. Nix on the aluminum.

                          Next week, they'll probably find out all that plastic stuf is good for you.

                          Brings up and interesting point:
                          My B-I-L has been having bouts with pneumonia since a chemical accident at his work. He's also been on blood pressure medicine. He had an emergency a couple of weeks ago when he failed to take his meds. Rushed to ER. The doctor said that he is against smoking, but the fact that my BIL smoked probably saved his life. He smokes 1/2 pack and the doctor said to continue but no more than that.

                          Lets see, coffee is still good for you this week isn't it?

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                          • #14
                            I wish I thought of the ceramics idea - that's the best one so far. I've done pottery work in the past and didn't think of it. Oh well.

                            FWIW, I believe what we'll find out within the next few years is that the State of California causes cancer. That or white lab mice.

                            -Markl
                            The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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                            • #15
                              Why not turn one out of wood it should be a nice excercise and a good fit can be achieved wood will hold up well to high heat and can be used for this easily I would try that or get a manufacturer of pottery to make you one or just buy anew crock pot.or if you need a crackpot phone his lurdshup "sir johan"Alistair
                              Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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