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The sun, heavy metal and fools...

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  • The sun, heavy metal and fools...



    HEAVY METAL

    HOT


    HOTTER



    HOTTEST





    To be continued...
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  • #2
    So, today is the hottest day in a long time around here, 100f in the shade. What do I have planned for today?

    Melt 75 pounds of lead and cast it, that's what.

    The setup:



    The pour, done that is...



    The finished product:



    The 3" x 3" x 14" container full of lead was calculated to come out at 43 lbs. It weighs 43 lbs. It is the counterweight for my cnc mill. The ingot is 16.5 lbs and is just what was left over (some left in the pot). I'm going to cut some of it up to make a hammer or two. The lead is from old wheel weights and cost me ten bucks. I used barbeque briquets to fire it up. My wife suggested I just leave it in the sun a bit longer.

    Did I sweat? Well, look at it this way. I drank about two gallons of water and haven't needed to piss.
    Last edited by Evan; 07-22-2006, 08:04 PM.
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    • #3
      hotties...

      Evan,, hope alistair doesn,t see these hotties!!!

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      • #4
        <voice=Crocodile Dundy>
        That’s not hawt! This is hawt!
        </voice>

        You think that’s hot, come visit us in Phoenix AZ where night time temps often don’t go below 100 with highs approaching 120 in the warmer parts of the summer. I've seen 122 in the shade, and it was 117 ambient when I was welding up the roll cage on my rock buggy in full sun with no shade...

        And just to add to our fun, Monsoon came early this year and it’s been quite humid. Oh, longing for the “dry heatâ€‌...
        Russ
        Master Floor Sweeper

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        • #5
          Here's a "130 Cook's Hammer Service" lead hammer. This is one of a handful from my FIL's shop. I hadn't seen these since the early '70s. A Google, however, showed that they are alive and well and not a relic of the past as I had thought.

          Since it says "hammer service", I suspect these were picked up periodically and replaced with re-molded ones. Den

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          • #6
            You think that’s hot, come visit us in Phoenix AZ
            Been there. I lived in Az for a time way back. Fort Huachuca to be exact.

            Considering that I am 2000 miles north of you, this is hot.
            Last edited by Evan; 07-22-2006, 09:13 PM.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              hot weather in williams lake...

              Evan, have to sympathize with you at that temp. I find it is doable if one just does a bit at a time and slows down the pace a bit. Usually we will get your weather in about 4-5 days here, so far we have had a high of 35c in the shade. Monday evening at 5:00pm it was 28c then a strong thunderstorm hit suddenly with the temp dropping to 18c in one hour. The result was a wicked storm with heavy rain, high winds, severe lightning, killing two people, thousands of trees down, and power out for 3-5 days to 170,000 people,22 barns destroyed,boats, cars and planes smashed or tipped over,etc. I live in a remote area, by myself,and off the grid, so did not realize the damage untill tuesday morn. when i tried to get out and found the roads blocked by fallen trees.One benefit of these high temps at least in my area, is this has been just an incredible growing year for everything, but these temps usually produce scarey storms. Ray in N. Ont

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              • #8
                Hey, 100*F is hot anywhere, regardless of latitude. Beyond that, it's just a matter of degrees anyway...
                Russ
                Master Floor Sweeper

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                • #9
                  Evan, 43 lbs is a fairly substantial amount of weight. You have prolly looked at all the various ideas to counter balance the head on your mill. What was the determining factor for using a weight vs some of the other ideas such as gas struts? The reason I ask is I am converting a mill to CNC and I have been kicking around some of the plans.

                  Your post is timely because I was just reading another article where the builder used gas struts and it appears to be the way to go. I would think subtracting weight would be more beneficial than adding weight as far as response is concerned.

                  http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=18047

                  The counter balance weight looks to be just as effective for controlling the weight issue but would slow the transition from positive to negative movement due to the weight.

                  On the other hand the constant force of a static weight has the advantage of providing a certain amount of backlash compensation because the force is always in one direction and constant.

                  As for the lead melt, yep, you are definitely a conservationist. Melting when the outside temp is at its highest in years, less fuel to burn But then again, you are using more H2O to cool the operator than would normally be used so it may be a wash JRouche
                  My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                  • #10
                    I considered the other options. I have some suitable gas springs but really don't like the change in force. While having the stepper move about 90 lbs does slow the acceleration that's all it does and that is easy to adjust in the control software. I plan on having it set with a small amount of up force, about five pounds heavier on the counterweight than the head. The pulley system and the counterweight are fully integrated in the mill and the added mass on the vertical assembly will lower the resonant frequency.
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                    • #11
                      That is giving me flashbacks to the time I cast 250 lead diving weights,it was summer then too.Funny how all the hot sweaty crap always comes up in the summer.

                      All you need to make that 100* better is about 85-90% humidity
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • #12
                        Eh..........

                        I see that thermometer, and it's still shy of 40C....

                        Thurs. it was about 40C here, and about half the folks in town don't have any power for fans, and won't for another week. (we do, so our fridge is full of the neighbor's stuff).

                        But, as long as it's gonna be hot, may as well do something that might be too hot to mess with if you weren't already hot...... !
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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                        • #13
                          Did I sweat? Well, look at it this way. I drank about two gallons of water and haven't needed to piss.
                          Evan I am pretty new here and have read a lot of your posts. You are definitely hardcore when it comes to this stuff!
                          That reminds me when I took a stint at UPS loading trailers at night and in the summer it was brutal. I would drink a gallon of water which is ~ 8.3lbs, not piss and come home 5 lbs lighter after only a 4 hour shift.
                          ahh yes good times.
                          The counter balance weight looks to be just as effective for controlling the weight issue but would slow the transition from positive to negative movement due to the weight.
                          hmmm, cnc zone....I read that thread also and I just don't see it happening in reality.
                          I cnc'd my mini mill and use a 269oz stepper on the z. The head is about 45lbs. I tried a gas spring, torsion spring and counterweight system on it.

                          Well the counterweight system was the best IMO. Super easy to adjust and easy full spindle travel setup.
                          I could move that little 45lb head at speeds that were ridiculous for this mill. Near 200IPM. Completely useless however for any real cutting duty and it just looked nifty to show people.CNC zone guys like that sort of thing. speed speed speed....
                          I took off the counter weight system because I moved the mill to a spot where it no longer would fit. Well now it will miss steps on fast transitions without the counter weight system. Go figure. It can still move the head very quickly even without the counterweight but sure can't do transitions any where near as good as with the counterweight system added.

                          Steve

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                          • #14
                            40c is 104f. That thermometer also reads about one degree C low.

                            I managed to do the entire melt and pour without burning myself. Can't say the same about the welding , making up the stand, ladle and forms. I had the top of my shirt open and have a nice light V shaped flash burn on my chest. However, a wierd consequence of my FMS condition is an increased melanin response. It will turn to a tan in 24 hours. I never get a sunburn.

                            [added]

                            Nice to hear your experience with the counterweight. The head on mine weighs nearly the same and I am also using similar steppers. I have set up the motor mount system so that I can use any ratio from 1 to 1 down to 6 to one. This mill is partly an experimental platform to try out a variety of ideas I have. That is one of the reasons it is taking me so long to finish. Everything in the design has been thought out in advance and allowed for. It has numerous features that are not apparent even on close inspection, such as the use of dimensions throughout that are either prime numbers and/or golden ratios. The entire structure makes use of multi layered fabricated sections instead of single pieces. For example, the vertical Z axis assembly consists of two separate columns and each column consists of three separate vertical parts fastened together. This greatly increases the damping characteristics. Likewise, the main base is two pieces of 3/4" tooling plate bolted together to make a 1.5" thick base with numerous stringers and braces underneath. All three axes are a prime number in length and different from one another.
                            Last edited by Evan; 07-23-2006, 01:21 AM.
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                            • #15
                              Nice to hear your experience with the counterweight. The head on mine weighs nearly the same and I am also using similar steppers. I have set up the motor mount system so that I can use any ratio from 1 to 1 down to 6 to one. This mill is partly an experimental platform to try out a variety of ideas I have. That is one of the reasons it is taking me so long to finish. Everything in the design has been thought out in advance and allowed for. It has numerous features that are not apparent even on close inspection, such as the use of dimensions throughout that are either prime numbers and/or golden ratios. The entire structure makes use of multi layered fabricated sections instead of single pieces. For example, the vertical Z axis assembly consists of two separate columns and each column consists of three separate vertical parts fastened together. This greatly increases the damping characteristics. Likewise, the main base is two pieces of 3/4" tooling plate bolted together to make a 1.5" thick base with numerous stringers and braces underneath. All three axes are a prime number in length and different from one another.
                              __________________
                              It has numerous features that are not apparent even on close inspection, such as the use of dimensions throughout that are either prime numbers and/or golden ratios.
                              whelp, you just lost ol' Steve on that all that number stuff. I come into this hobby after 25 years of being into hot rodding, drag racing and metal fab work.
                              Prime numbers and golden ratios were not my strong point. No it was usually let's try it and go take it to the track and see if it works.

                              Steve

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