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OT- Does anyone make an inkjet printer than lasts more than 6 months ?

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  • LastOldDog
    replied
    I think partially due to the seemingly impressive 'laser quality' print, many folks have abandoned the tried and true dot matrix printers in favor of ink jet. I have a nice color photo printer but I do not waste it for day-to-day text printing. My work horse is an old Panasonic KX P2624 wide format 24 pin dot matrix with an endless ribbon cartridge, easy to reink and no mess. This quiet printer at ~38lb is packed with sound attenuation fibre, and can feed from the top, back or bottom. It also can feed single sheet for letterhead or special forms, but for our purposes, we set it on 'Draft', and, use tractor feed laser cut fan-fold box paper 'cause it is cheap, maintenance free, easy to load and no jams. Also it will do multi-part forms. When the ribbon is finally beat to a frazzle, replacements are ~$6.25.

    Having personally crossed the threshhold into the age of antiquity, I'm not ready to sacrifice a fully functional, working, dependable machine for a fickle disposable printer soooo dependent on expensive consumables.

    Lloyd

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  • Evan
    replied
    Epsons, many people swear by, especially the longevity of their photos. Evan made mention of the 100 and 200 years. I really think that is BS. 6 months trial, and they say it will last 200 years. OH, YES!!! ACCELERATED trials.
    Not BS. I have extensive training in marking technology. The Epson archival inks use pigments that are well proven to be light fast. The life trials aren't a test of the pigment fastness but of the compatibility of the ink with the papers and the life of the paper plus ink combination. Under most display conditions the paper will begin to fail before the pigment does. The question of light fastness only applies to the color inks as the black inks use carbon black. Carbon black has an infinite lifetime under display conditions. The most difficult ink color to produce is magenta and it has taken a long time to find a stable magenta pigment that can be used in an inkjet printer. Note that the stability of pigment inks is far greater than the stability of the dye based inks that are usually used in color inkjet printers as well as photography.

    Green and blue shade are produced with phtalocyanine based pigments which are a very stable ring structure. Magenta and yellow are often organic azo compounds which are much less stable which is why posters in the sun fade to blue after a time.

    Xerox pioneered the development of stable magenta inks using lithol rubine pigment for the first color copier, the Xerox 6500, which I worked on in the 70s. The technology is now well known and the challenge for Epson was to find a way to make the pigment particles small enough to squirt through an inkjet nozzle reliably.

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  • Mortimerex
    replied
    Well, I'm in the same wagon. I've owned a dozen inkjet printers now and 6months is about par. Of course they only cost about $20 so its not that painful to get a new one. I don't know, if this Cannon craps out like my previous Hp or the Epson, or the...I may just get my old 10 year old b&w laser printer back out of the attic and use it. But it weighs like 80 # and takes up an awful lot of room. My "office" is about as tiny as my workshop which is why I keep using inkjets, other than maybe once a year I will print a beautiful color picture..

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  • gmatov
    replied
    As to the 30 plus Canon Black cart, that has to be a BC 20, an antique, that is what I need in my 2 all-in-one machines. WalMart, about 32 bucks.

    Fortunately, I know how to refill, else I would have scrapped these both, years ago. First, a 2500, was a 600 buck printer/scanner/copier/fax.

    The color carts fit into a print head, each, the color and the BW are like 3 1/2 drops ink per each, and about 14 bucks per color cart. I refill them, too, or, same, would pitch it. BUT, it is an adequate Fax machine.

    Have been using canons with BE or BC 3 and 6 carts, just bought my one daughter, for her birthday, a 4200 which takes a BC or BE8. Has LEDs built in to tell you when you are low on ink. Great, except they cut the rear bottom corner off to put in contacts for the LedS. means my 50 or so replacements don't fit her machine, though my inks do work with her carts.

    The trouble with printheads built into the printer is that if they die, the printer is dead, basically.

    Canon uses a printhead that is cradled into the carriage. Should it clog, dry up, pull it, either use a printhead cleaner or, as mentioned, a dilute ammonia solution. Even use a refill kit's suction atachment to draw ink through it. Just a little rubber funnel hat you put on the hypo and draw the plunger up instead of pushing it in.

    OR, you soak it and use the same funnel shaped attachment and force water/cleaner, through the nozzles.

    Worst comes to worst, depending on the model, you might buy a complete print cradle with new carts for under 50 bucks. Myself, I would buy the cheapsest model with a good print spec, at 100 or less, if my deader was over a year old.

    Would NEVER buy a Lexmark, including a Dell, they have been proven to be the HIGHEST cost in ink of any other printer.

    Epsons, many people swear by, especially the longevity of their photos. Evan made mention of the 100 and 200 years. I really think that is BS. 6 months trial, and they say it will last 200 years. OH, YES!!! ACCELERATED trials.

    Bull****. Kinda like MTBF on a ball bearing. Less, actually BBs are run in a controlled environment for the life of the BB. Perfectly lubed, temp controlled, etc, fail tomorow, the replacement lasts 12 years, 6 years MTBF.

    Cheers,

    George

    Could go on and on, GOTTA go to bed.

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  • Scishopguy
    replied
    OT- Does anyone make an inkjet printer than lasts more than 6 months ?

    I have an old HP 697C that I have used since about 1998 and she is still working like a champ. When I came out to Arkansas to build my shop (the first stage in my retirement move) all I had was my laptop. I went to WalMart and bought an HP 8xx and the joker didn't last a month. When it was working it was fine but one day it went "snap" and the print head went limp. The cartridges cost 50% more than the whole printer and it was about 90% plastic. Won't do that again. I dragged one of my old Panasonic dot matrix printers out of storage and charged on. Most of what I print is e-mail or an Auto Sketch drawing so I don't really need color. The dot matrix is not really precise but you are not supposed to "scale the print" anyway. The ribbons for those are available at Staples.com.

    Jim (KB4IVH)

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  • Orrin
    replied
    Getting back to the original question, my answer is yes. I've had my HP Deskjet 1220C for three or four years and it works great. I keep track of the dates we change out the cartridges and for ordinary home office use they last for about a year. Granted, office use would be a whole different ball game.

    Our climate is bone-dry, so I exercise the printer, regularly, to keep the print nozzles from drying and clogging. So far, we've not had any failures.

    Our favorite printer was an early HP laser printer, IIP, or something like that. But, eventually an interlock photocell, somehwere, insisted that a door was open, somewhere, so it refused to work, any more. By this time it was so old it was impractical to get it serviced.

    I've eavesdropped on photographic forums (fora) and the printer topic never seems to get settled. Many people love their Epsons and an equal number seems to hate them because of print-head clogging. Most people seem to like their HPs and nobody ever seems to dislike their Canons.

    If you can get along without color, get a laser printer.

    That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

    Orrin

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  • Your Old Dog
    replied
    If ever there was a good excuse to purchase "extended warranty" it's printers. My last printers box is stored in the garage with the paperwork inside of it and the date of expiration markered on the outside of the box so I know when to throw it away. Don't know how many extended warranties I've purchased that I've forgotten about.

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  • KyMike
    replied
    My solution to the printer problem was a $15 IBM-Lexmark b & w laser from a flea market. My first printer was a Canon, picked because the ink tanks could be replaced individually and I guessed I would be using more black than color ink, so it seemed to be the most economical choice at the time. Worked ok, with an occasional minor head clog, for about a year and then I decided to try one of those "fill-your-own-cartridge" kits. That ink did such a good job of permanently clogging the works that I finally had to junk the whole printer. Up to then I had been able to clear minor clogs by soaking the head in a solution of ammonia, water and detergent and rinsing in alcohol. A new head from Canon was almost as much as a new inkjet, and since back then I might go for 3 months or longer without printing anything, I decided a good used laser was a better buy. The IBM is a 1995 model and is still working fine, at least for text which is 99% of what I print anyhow.

    MIke

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Just an observation, many of us repeated what others said, I guess we are all too lazy to read every post, including myself.

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  • ASparky
    replied
    What I will say has mostly been said ... but

    Inkjets and Bubblejets are not cheap to print, It is pay buy installment - buying the ink and/or heads is the true cost of printing.
    Buy a laser if you nearly always print in B&W its way way cheaper in the medium to long run.
    If you do print photos and color stump up for good paper its worth it.
    If you have an inkjet print at least once a week, or turn off and on once a day - and it will chew a little ink while doing that.

    Refills can work despite what the manufacturer may say, BUT there are different types of printing mechanisms and some inks will not work on some types and not others, so be carefull and when you find one that works stick with it when you can. Some inks will work on all types, but then the refill usually costs more. Note that even a few of the "exchange a cartridge" people get it wrong.

    Also for color, the printer is designed for a particular shade of dye, and for a particular effect of the dyes being overlayed, often refills will alter the printed colors- sometimes really badly. Generally, particularly if fussy, get refills of the black if you wish, but brand name manufacturer new for the color.

    If you can stand the inconvienince and you print color seldom or have a laser and use the inkjet only ocassionally. Get an inkjet where the jet and the cartridge are one, yes the cartridge is expensive and usually all colors are in the same cartridge so when you run out of blue there maybe gallons of red left. Some have the option of BW only cartridges, you can run a BW for day to day work, and keep the color in a plastic ziplock bag.

    With the head and ink together cartridge type, you can remove the cartridge and place in a airtight bag after every use to prevent (well slow down) the drying. A slightly wet (damp) lint free rag inside the bag helps.

    Doing this where the head is on the printer and only ink is in the cartridge is a waste of time. The head is where the drying occurs, keeping the ink tank in the printer will actually help prevent the head drying out.

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  • JPR
    replied
    It seems that most of the HP "professional" series inkjet printers are decent.

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  • Dick Plasencia
    replied
    This may be a very late comment but I'd like to share my experience with Epson ink jet printers. I'm on #3 warranty replacement and so far so good. The previous printers were the C-66 model which worked fine for almost a year and the first developed a defective red nozzle. Not clogged mind you, it just flat out quit working. That was replaced on warranty by a second C-66 which worked fine for about 3 months and the yellow and red crapped out. Cleaning restored some function but it was still marginal. Epson told me to keep it and sent me a replacement C-68. This one works great. Makes nice photographs and prints like a dream. It has been in service nearly a year and printed several reams of paper already. I refill my cartridges using ink from Atlantic Supply. Their ink is the Epson Dura Brite and sells for 50% more than the other ink suppliers. My cost to refill a cartridge is about 20 cents. It takes me a grand total of 15 to 20 minutes to refill all four cartridges in the printer. The only mess is a sheet of newspaper to catch the stray drops and a couple of paper towels. I do have a chip resetter and that works fine.
    Epson has resolved a class action suit about their short filling the cartriges and other issues related to "abusive" pricing. The lawyers have sent me 3 vouchers to claim $25 each in cash or $50 in goods from the Epson online store.
    I like my C68 in spite of being bottom line equipment. It does well and in the final analysis is cheap enough to be classed as disposable. However this one seems to have corrected the problems found in the previous printers.

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  • Fueler
    replied
    Oh yeah, one more good deal.
    I have not had to purchase printer paper in the last 7 years.
    My Office Depot will trade a ream of their recycled paper for an empty ink cartridge.
    1 per visit per customer, so I usually drag the wife along in order to get 2 at a time. The paper works in both styles of printers.
    Nice letterhead paper you have to buy of course.
    So, don't can those irritating high priced cartridges. Get paid (more or less) to recycle them!

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  • Fueler
    replied
    I use an HP 5L lazer in the shop. About 10 years old now. Had to buy a part off the internet to fix a paper feeding problem a couple of years ago. It's a common thing with this model.

    I have never gotten an ink jet to survive the shop environment more than 2 years. 3 to 4 years on computers. If there are chemicals in the air the age factor doubles at the least.
    Good thing they are cheap. I gave up grumbling about it. I just treat them as throwaways and pull the hard drives and ram and go get whatever is on sale or closeout.

    Office machines are in a cleaner envrironment will go a lot longer but I never kept track on those.

    For super deals on computers, printers and monitors:
    If you live in a university town watch the papers and www.craigslist.org especially around graduation time. The students may not want to drag this stuff home when they leave and they literally give the stuff away.
    I just bought a 1 year old pristine 20" monitor for $20.00. Last year a computer for $50.00. Be prepared for a language barrier (other than money) as most of these great deals seem to come from graduate students from other lands.

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  • Evan
    replied
    On the other hand, I refuse to do repairs on HP printers in my shop. Since HP and Compaq merged the service policies have changed. They have an online parts system that allows you to easily and clearly identify replacement parts.

    Not long after the merger a few years ago I needed a new print head ribbon cable for an expensive wide format HP Deskjet 1000 printer. I went to the HP Parts Surfer website as usual and found the part. When I clicked on the part image to get the part number it told me "not available". Ok, "what's up with that?" I thought to myself. It turns out the website designer wasn't all that smart as the file name of the part image was the part number.

    I called the HP parts order line and asked to order the part. I was asked if I was an authorized HP repair center. I am not and said so. I was then told that the part was only available to authorized repair centers, thank you and goodbye.

    I am in the business, among other things, of repairing computers and accessories. I have a retail storefront, a business licence and provincial and federal tax numbers.

    After being refused I did a quick lookup of the Canadian Competition Act to confirm what I already knew. It is illegal to refuse to sell parts to anyone in a business that has a legitimate requirement for those parts if you sell those parts to anybody else in a similar business.

    HP does sell those parts to the Kamloops Computer Centre south of here who are in the same business as I am. I called HP back and informed them that they must sell me the part under law. After going up the food chain for about half an hour I finally reached somebody in the legal department that decided that I could buy the part after all. No ****, sherlock.

    Anyway, since that episode I refuse to work on HP printers. One of these days HP is going to get slapped down by the Competition Comissioner which is the equivalent of the FTC in the states.

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