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Indexing splines made easy(pic)

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  • Indexing splines made easy(pic)

    I needed to mill up some 7/8"-6 parallel splines for a customer yesterday and didn't want to setup a rotary table so I cheated

    Found a section of 1" 4140 hex bar on the shelf and used it.I turned the end down to a .880" od and then using a 7/32" endmill set .044" deep milled six slots using the flats of the hexbar for indexing.Blued the leading end of the spline and tried the fit.I had to spin the the .880" od down to .878"after which the sprockets slipped on nice and tight with a bump or two from my hand,no slack to speak of and the fit is the same for every position of the six teeth.

    Total time for the spline,20 minutes.

    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    Not bad there stud. Never would have thunk it.

    20 min? Must have been a good profit margin.

    Cheers!
    rock-
    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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    • #3
      Not over complicating things is the differance between a good machinist and a good machinist that is also fast. Good idea

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      • #4
        Yep, good idea, I have a live steam book that uses that method to quarter up the locomotive drivers, it uses a square since the goal is a perfect 90 deg seperation between the cranks on the locomotive drivers.

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        • #5
          Great use of the beanie!

          Now, where can I find tridecagon stock?

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          • #6
            Nice work.

            Don't underestimate the usefulness of the square and hex 5C collet holders for similar applications. I have a Swiss made set that are excellent.

            I also have a Taiwan set that aren't.
            Jim H.

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            • #7
              Not much profit guy is a friend too,the real time saver on that job was the turned section of the shaft.Had to spin the hex off down to .750" for the 10" behind the spline.That gave me a good chance to set the tailstock on the lathe.First pass sure enough it was out .003" second got it to .0001" taper over 10",not bad for a 69 year old Hendey,life is good.

              He says it's a jackshaft idler for the bike he is building.He needed to offset the drive chain and move the chain clearance up about 1".The two sprockets are mated by the splined section while the .75" end fits some bearing blocks.I think it will work,but the overhung load has me concerned slightly,even thought the rear axle bearings aren't too much bigger and they are carrying the wieght of the bike plus the running torque.

              Ken,tridecagon stock,ROTFLMAO,same thought I was having this afternoon.Next job involving splines is a 25mm 8 tooth Mercrusier spline,went digging for an old piece of muzzleloader barrel I had laying around and Dangit! Too small
              I just need one more tool,just one!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JCHannum
                Nice work.

                Don't underestimate the usefulness of the square and hex 5C collet holders for similar applications. I have a Swiss made set that are excellent.

                I also have a Taiwan set that aren't.
                That would have been my first choice since I do have a set,but they are Taiwan CHEAP JUNK and your right,they aren't very good.Mine have bores that are a good .010" oversized at the rear where the collets body section falls.As a result when the nut is tightened it cocks the collet over to one side,totally unacceptable.When I get a chance I intend to bore out and sleeve the blocks to see if I can improve them.

                On a side note I do have a round 5-c collet holder made by Eaglerock(USA)EXPENSIVE JUNK! Set me back $90 as I remember and the runout is horrible.
                I just need one more tool,just one!

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                • #9
                  Cool trick! I'll have to put that one in the bag in case it is ever needed.

                  Good job, BTW!
                  Why buy it for $2 when you can make it for $20

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                  • #10
                    Good one Darin! I could now make that but....not in twenty minutes. I'd need at least an hour to find the hex stock that's hid somewhere in my shop/mess.
                    I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                    • #11
                      Well done,Man you must have had that mill cranked up to do it in 20 minutes.

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                      • #12
                        Wierd,

                        That's a good idea. I've used it a time or two.
                        One time I used it to index these marker lights for machining in the vise.

                        My indexer is too big and would require extension tooling.
                        Had to first mill flats on the bar.



                        Another time an "expert machinist" gave me a phonelic lathe job to make out of square block.

                        He figured I'd have to set up the four jaw etc. and give him a couple hours smoke break time.

                        I sawed the thing down to three sides and set it in the three jaw!

                        Sorry bub, no break on my watch.

                        Kap

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                        • #13
                          Kap,that is a neat looking light,are the glass frames applied with silver solder or recessed in?
                          Nice,reminds me of a diving helmet.
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

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                          • #14
                            Looks good! My compliments to the chef.

                            Maybe a groove for a "C" clip to keep the sprockets from walking?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by LarryinLV
                              Looks good! My compliments to the chef.

                              Maybe a groove for a "C" clip to keep the sprockets from walking?
                              No sweat,it gets a nyloc nut and a spacer.
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

                              Comment

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