Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can Anyone Identify This Small Milling Machine?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Can Anyone Identify This Small Milling Machine?

    Hello,

    I am new to the forum and looking for a little bit of help. I purchased this small machine recently but I have no idea of the make or model. The motor has a stamp of 1988 and it is certainly the original motor. The machine weighs about 225 lbs, has a 6x25" table with 6x15" of XY travel and approximately 14" of Z travel. It has 6 speeds via gearbox and the head
    tilts +/- 90 degrees. If anyone knows who made it I would really appreciate the help.

    Thanks,

    Booth

    PS - Sorry for the dark picture.

    Jeff Booth
    Boston, MA

  • #2
    It sure looks like an EMCO;

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/emcomiller/

    It is a good machine, and it is surprising that it has no nameplates, it is something to be proud of.
    Jim H.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, it has that EMCO look about it. I suppose it could be a clone, but 1988 sort of predates the Asian invasion.

      There are a couple of electric motor experts who contribute here often.. Perhaps they could point out some little details that indicate whether the motor is Asian or European. Or you could open it up and look at the switch. There should be something written on it...brand or logo...that may give it away.

      I recently bought an EMCO Mentor 10 lathe, and there is no doubt about it's country of origin when you get into the electrics.

      Comment


      • #4
        Jim,

        You nailed it on the head. Thanks very much, you saved me some trouble. After reading that excellent article I was able to ascertain that it is the FB2. It seems like a nice machine that has hardly been used. The bed is pretty clean with only a few scratchs and the bearings and ways seem pretty tight.

        Another question. The head and column were disassembled off the base and some oil slowly drained out the side as it lay. Any idea what weight/type of oil I should use in the gearbox?

        Thanks again

        Booth
        Jeff Booth
        Boston, MA

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JCHannum
          It sure looks like an EMCO;

          http://www.lathes.co.uk/emcomiller/

          It is a good machine, and it is surprising that it has no nameplates, it is something to be proud of.
          While Emco makes some nice machines, I don't know that I would go quite so far as to label this one of that ilk. They are ok for very light work, but that compact head seems to suffer from 'too much crammed in one place' syndrome. Quill travel is limited and they are prone to gear train trouble. Plus the usual tramming issues with a round column.

          Still, if the price is right and treated with care, could be a pleasant machine to use for many years.

          Comment


          • #6
            oil

            Industrial Hobbies site has a whole treaty on what oil to use to keep the performance and longevity of the mill. See:www.industrialhobbies.com/. Vic Smagovic

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by D. Thomas
              While Emco makes some nice machines, I don't know that I would go quite so far as to label this one of that ilk. They are ok for very light work, but that compact head seems to suffer from 'too much crammed in one place' syndrome. Quill travel is limited and they are prone to gear train trouble. Plus the usual tramming issues with a round column.

              Still, if the price is right and treated with care, could be a pleasant machine to use for many years.

              Whats tramming issue with a round columns?

              I have a new (3 months old bottom of the line enco mini-mill 19.75"x7"x5" travel 2hp r8, 12speed pully job). Its got a round column and so far it works same as some bridgeports I used at work. Course I haven't done any real super hog milling but even though I much prefer acetal or nylon for making prototypes, the several steel items I've machined caused no problems. Um, I did notice on these minimills that you got to lock down the axis you aren't cutting on, ie lock y and z then mill on x. Do that and it can make parts like right on about +-.002 in 6". Of course I use an accurite DRO and a heavy drill vice. The vice most of these mini mills come with are worthless. I couldn't get mine set to maintain accurace of even +- .1" !! Borrowed one of my dads 6" large drill press vice and it works +-0.002" in 6". Just ordered a 200# machinists 8" milling vice, thats gonna suck taking it on and off but it should be even more accurate. I hope.

              Anyway, whats tramming? I know a tram is some sort of electric bus the fruitcakes in California have but don't know what thats got to do with round column mills.
              “It was not til Leibniz and Newton, by the discovery of the differential calculus, had dispelled the ancient darkness which enveloped the conception of the infinite, and had clearly established the conception of the continuous and continuous change, that a full and productive application of the newly found mechanical conceptions made any progressâ€‌

              Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mortimerex
                Whats tramming issue with a round columns?

                Anyway, whats tramming?
                LOL!

                Tramming is adjusting the head on a mill so that the spindle is perpendicular to the table. If the head is "out of tram" the endmill will cut at a compound angle to the workpiece, and you'll leave nastly overlapping patterns in parallel cuts.

                The only problem with tramming a round column is if there's no means for adjustment other than unbolting the column and shimming it, like you have to do for the Chinese Mill/Drills.

                Most turret mills have a ball joint on the head which rotates left/right, and this makes tramming a lot easier, but it really has nothing to do with whether the Z-axis uses a round column or box ways -- in fact, this Emco Round-Column mill has the same ball-joint, so tramming should be easy. Mills that don't have the "nod head," including many Bridgeport mills, can't be trammed in the y-axis direction without shimming the head ram.

                I think what Don may have meant as an issue with round-column mills is that they lose their workpiece reference when you raise and lower the head, since there's usually no positive lock mechanism to keep the head from rotating.
                Last edited by lazlo; 08-06-2006, 12:24 AM.
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for the explanation.

                  My mill I don't think the head will tilt to the sides. It will swing out like a drill press but the quill stays parallel to the column. I guess it would make it easier to mill some convoluted parts but I dunno if its worth it even then. Better to just get CNC for making convoluted parts. Or just use a good angle vice, not the junk so-called angle vice that comes with most import mill/drills tho.

                  Ok, so the "tramming" is when you raise the mill head (instead of raising the knee since cheapo mini-mills have a rack and not a knee) using the rack and the whole mill head swings side to side as you crank it up or down? That makes trams sound sorta like roller coasters tho. Are they really that bad?

                  Anyway, I got 2 edge finders -one for running and a battery-light one for finding edges when its not running. That plus my 3 axis DRO makes re locating easy. But the only time I have to crank the z-rack is when I switch from drilling to boring or milling as they each have a different height(milling, drilling, boring) . Though I'm definitely gonna get a knee mill next time I win a lottery, and use the mill/drill for drilling at which its a beast. I finally got my first design almost close enough to built to decide if I really want to patent it or not so if it works may make enough off that to pay for my machines and maybe get some better ones. I think the mini-mills are fine for prototyping and I plan to eventually convert my current one to a CNC drill machine even after I get a full up knee mill.
                  Last edited by Mortimerex; 08-06-2006, 12:44 AM.
                  “It was not til Leibniz and Newton, by the discovery of the differential calculus, had dispelled the ancient darkness which enveloped the conception of the infinite, and had clearly established the conception of the continuous and continuous change, that a full and productive application of the newly found mechanical conceptions made any progressâ€‌

                  Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mortimerex
                    It will swing out like a drill press but the quill stays parallel to the column.
                    ...
                    Ok, so the "tramming" is when you raise the mill head (instead of raising the knee since cheapo mini-mills have a rack and not a knee) using the rack and the whole mill head swings side to side as you crank it up or down?
                    No, that's my point: the round column mills still maintain their tram when you move the head up and down on the round column for the reason you indicate: the quill remains parallel to the column. The only thing you lose is the reference point on the workpiece.

                    So the round column has nothing to do with tram. It is a nuisance in that you "lose center" and have to relocate the workpiece when you move the head up and down, but there are a lot of ways to reduce that pain -- laser pointers, column locks or pins, ...

                    What I used to do when working on a round column mill is to put a cylindrical square on the table when I needed to move the head up or down, indicate the quill off the cylindrical square, move the head, and then re-indicate on the cylindrical square. I could be back on alignment in less than a minute, including fussing with the column bolts, which tend to pull the head around when you tighten them.

                    But you're right -- working on a knee mill is a lot more convenient.
                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey, thats a great idea! -the square block reference sounds like it may save a minute or so each time you crank the rack, likely placed on the backmost t-slot of my table since I have my vice set up in the center.
                      “It was not til Leibniz and Newton, by the discovery of the differential calculus, had dispelled the ancient darkness which enveloped the conception of the infinite, and had clearly established the conception of the continuous and continuous change, that a full and productive application of the newly found mechanical conceptions made any progressâ€‌

                      Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hey, if all you had before was a clapped out 1/2hp drill press and you ain't rollin' in dough you have every right to be proud of this machine, some people linda think if it's not the very best machine on the planet you should be ashamed of owning it, BS!
                        "four to tow, two to go"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by speedsport
                          , some people linda think if it's not the very best machine on the planet you should be ashamed of owning it, BS!
                          Being in the business a long time, I've met a gazillion machinists in my day, don't know anyone like that...do you ?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            D Thomas -
                            Not having met that many machinists, it's still been my observation that the pride comes from being able to make good parts with a less-than-perfect machine. The shame would be (at least in my case) owning a beautiful Hardinge HLVH toolroom lathe (in perfect condition, of course) yet not being able to make a decent part. (Yet another reason that, even though I could afford one with another mortgage or two on the house, I could never justify it.)

                            In other words, some really bad machines just can't make good parts, but a really good machinist knows his machine and how to work around its shortcomings.

                            IMHO, YMMV, usual disclaimers.

                            -Mark
                            The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Wirecutter
                              D Thomas -
                              Not having met that many machinists, it's still been my observation that the pride comes from being able to make good parts with a less-than-perfect machine.
                              -Mark
                              I can understand that. As long as one is not tense due to machine erratic behavior or cussing at their machine and enjoying the process, the enjoyment and pride in the finished parts is what matters.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X