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  • #31
    I fixed several notebooks in the past with well and very well hidden batteries. Some of the hidden ones have been under the keyboard bezel, above the keyboard, some tucked in or behind whatever sort of panel holds the i/o connectors on the rear apron.

    One little baby needed major disassembly as the battery was a single lithium coin cell mounted on a pcb BETWEEN two other pcb assemblies, totally out of view.

    The DS1287 with integral battery was a bit large for notebooks and the external battery model must have been a much later product. The integral battery was a good idea until the 10 year life turned into 7 or even 5 as temperature and operating conditions came into play. Much older industrial equipment turned to junk as the DS1287, some DS prefix SRAMS and the DS5000 micro (8051) core turned to vapor with calibration constants or other critical parameters stored on them Den

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    • #32
      The DS12xx RTC modules were one of the truly stupid ideas. A lot of desktops also turned into junk as the modules were originally hard to get in single units. The best option was to replace the thing with an RTC card, not an option for a notebook or similar.

      Toshiba is one of my least favorite notebooks. I have or had Toshiba, Compaq, Ibm and Acer and an ancient NEC which is the same as the Tandy 100. For ease of access and repair the old Thinkpad 365 units I have cannot be beat. You slide two finger catches on either side of the machine and the entire top with the keyboard opens up revealing the guts. For reliability the NEC is by far the best. It still works 20 years later and I have never had to press the reset button on it. Of course, it isn't good for much but it was pretty cool in the early 80s.
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      • #33
        That adapter............

        I investigated the adapters....... Apparently they are not needed.....

        The connector on this not quite 3" wide disk is the same size as the thing those adapt TO...... i.e. a standard-looking cable.

        It apparently is NOT a "laptop drive" standard...

        But, NO POWER CONNECTOR.... power is over the regular cable, which , since I no longer remember the pinouts, suggests a non-standard pinout..... danged if I remember.

        Does this sound right?



        Fujitsu MHK2048AT disk......
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #34
          Oops. BTW, what's the date of manufacture and the size of that drive?
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #35
            size is 4.8gB

            Mechanically it is 2.27 x 4 x just under .375....

            12-2000 mfr date

            5V 0.55A
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

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            • #36
              Uh oh. From 9/2000 to 9/2001 Fujitsu hard drives in that size range up to 20 gigs had a faulty controller chip. It's a long story but the bottom line is that they are lucky to last a few years. They had a 50% failure rate within two years. Time for new hard drive.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #37
                Okay, that figures....... No problem if so.

                I still am curious about the adapter and the drive, since I can easily check the drive just in case I can get something off it, etc.

                Also, checking for Toshiba special parts, etc, that I might not be able to buy easily...

                The connector, as I mentioned, is as wide as a standard plug.... BUT, apparently not all pins are used. The connector in the unit is narrower, comparable to the adapter.....

                And, by the look of it, it does NOT iuse the 12V at all...

                Presumably then it does use the adapter, including the power connector? Even though it appears to be the same size as the normal connector?

                Pic of unit with spec label



                Pic of the connector (between white lines) and the HDD connector, obviously wider. The space between a couple pins fits the edge of the connector at one end....

                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Evan
                  UTime for new hard drive.
                  Ahh, yeah, been there done that...


                  This kinda spelled the doom: "disk i/o error replace teh disk and then press any key."

                  Originally posted by JRouche
                  Hard drive is done.
                  Try and boot from a floppy to dos and fdisk /mbr. (by the way, this will wipe the drive)
                  If you cannot access the HD it's toast.
                  JRouche
                  My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                  • #39
                    If you cannot acces the HDD SOMETHING is toast....

                    It may be the HDD

                    It may be a connector problem

                    It may be a component problem on the MB.

                    It sounds like there is good reason to think the HDD has a problem.... But, since it worked a bit after the problem became evident, and it seemed to be affected by various environmental things, the HDD is only at a 85% certainty..... and it may be possible to get stuff off it anyhow.

                    Before I spend money on this machine, I am going to need to verify the HDD is bad...... so that it is virtually certain that ANOTHER C-note tossed into the hole will make a difference.... I don't need a HDD at all if the problem is elsewhere.....


                    Hence the interest in trying to run it on a different system.... if its fairly cheap to do.

                    Engineers are like that, we don't like just replacing parts to see if they are bad.... we leave that to the AS-whatever certified mechanics..... and the HVAC technicians.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #40
                      The failure mode for that particular controller problem is that it overheats because of improper epoxy used to hold the chip to the board. This wears it out early from dopant migration and it begins to display symptoms as you describe until finally it won't work at all. I haven't seen them come back at that point and I have seen many of these failures.

                      The connector may have 4 extra pins that are unused. Just plug the adapter in to the same pins as are used in the laptop and use the provided power connector on the adapter.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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