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Old Machinist books

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  • Old Machinist books

    Kap Pullen mentioned in jis thread older (from 1900,s) machinist books. Where would someone get a look at or purchase reprinted copies. Im interested in the old ways especially pit lathes and such.

  • #2
    From older machinists ?



    Do you have a large library close by?
    Last edited by LarryinLV; 08-23-2006, 11:16 AM.

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    • #3
      Try http://www.lindsaybks.com/.

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      • #4
        Old Machinist books

        The next best thing to "old machinists" is going to the thrift stores in retirement areas. I have been going to some in the St. Pete area of Florida for years. They are always overloaded with old books and nobody seems to want them. You can get hard bound books for $0.25 to $1.00 each and quite often they are technical books. I have a pretty good collection and just recently scored a copy (first edition) of the Tool Engineer's Handbook, copyright 1949. This book is a treasure trove of knowlege. I also have gotten books to support my other interests, like guns, antique autos, and other stuff.

        Happy hunting,
        Jim (KB4IVH)

        Only fools abuse their tools.

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        • #5
          one of the best, Modern Machine Shop Practice by Rose, is also free online (and the scans are very high resolution).

          check out

          http://digital.lib.msu.edu/collectio...ollectionID=10

          The quality of the drawings are incredible. In his age of easy digital publishing, anyone can turn out any kind of crap cheaply and quickly. I have to believe we've lost a quality control filter - in 1887 the immensity of creating and illustrating the book was a filter, only the best would be provided with the resources need to make it to press; less is more type of thing

          anyway, philosophizing aside, it is a very complete and interesting work well worth downloading
          Last edited by Mcgyver; 08-23-2006, 12:56 PM.
          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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          • #6
            Been a long time since reading that. Notice they didn't need a computer....or CNC!

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            • #7
              I go to used book stores. There was one store that would call me if he got in machine related books. I have bought many good old books that way. Google for used book sites on the net. There are a lot out there but you need to know titles most the time. You can email the stores on the net and ask if they have old machinist related books.
              It's only ink and paper

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              • #8
                Nation Builders

                Try Nation Builders books. he travels to the shows Iron Fever Cabin fever Rough &Tumble etc or on the web www.nbbooks.com/ just the kind of stuff you are looking for he carries lindsays stuff, reprints under his own label and carries old reprints from other publishers.
                Regards
                Tin
                Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

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                • #9
                  What's a pit lathe? The only thing I can find is for turning the wheels on railroad cars, etc.

                  Roger
                  Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                  • #10
                    Check the picture of the spinning lathe I posted in the metal spinning thread.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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