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Removing Broken Bolts

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  • #16
    If you're using an EZ out you're already having a bad day. Don't make it worse by breaking off the ez out. Left handed drills are great, I hear the welding on a nut trick is great, but I say stop and take a breather. Not long ago I broke the heads off 2 of 3 bolts removing an air brake pedal. After removing the treadle I soaked the bolts with PB blaster, the repair got put on the back burner. When I got back to it 2 months later, one tap of the hammer on each and I unscrewed the broken bolts with only my fingers, the boss and my coworkers still don't believe me but it's the truth.

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    • #17
      Anyone tried the Loctite freeze spray for this job? I've used it to help with shrink fitting shaft couplings in situ, never used it for its intended purpose.

      Tim

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      • #18
        slightly off topic

        Originally posted by Ken_Shea
        I have over the years blown out literally hundreds of broken studs in cast iron manifolds using a acet/oxy torch, sometimes sacrificing the first couple of threads (sometimes not) but after that they are ok.
        There is learned technique to it but it is easily done.
        I've used a similar technique on exhaust systems to get the stub from a muffler or pipe out of the inside of another pipe. In this case putting the heat of the flame along the length of the pipe. The rust/corrosion between pipes is somewhat of an insulator and if done right keeps the outer piece from getting hot enough to melt.

        I suspect there is some of that happening with the steel studs in the casting. I imagine the back spatter in your face must be something though...

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        • #19
          "I have over the years blown out literally hundreds of broken studs in cast iron manifolds using a acet/oxy torch, sometimes sacrificing the first couple of threads (sometimes not)"

          Now that is impressive to me! Maybe all the rest of you are good with an o/a torch but i've only used one, maybe 10 times. I can't manage those awsome smooth cuts and delicate stuff you all can. I think thats really cool!
          The oxy-acetylene approach is my preferred method when the stud is obviously stuck, solidly.

          The less drastic tricks should be used first, such as left-hand drill, slotting with a Dremel cut-off wheel, etc.

          The trick to the oxy-acetylene method is to work fast. If the stud is stuck in cast-iron, speed isn't quite so important. In steel, work fast in order to keep the base material from reaching ignition temperature.

          I've never tried burning a stud out of aluminum. IMHO, the risk of failure is too high. In such a case I'll drill the stud considerably under-sized, then carefully open up the hold with a carbide burr to the point where the threads are visible all the way around.

          At that point the remainder of the stud can be picked out with a scribe.

          Regards,

          Orrin
          So many projects. So little time.

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