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  • L J K Setrights book

    Have a look on http://www.abebooks.com for the Setright book Some Unusual Engines - wow

    I notice that most are listed as ex- library copies so the chances or ever getting to see a copy are getting slimmer by the day.

    What makes this worse is that there is little or no chance that there will be a reprint.

    The music industry has had to wake up what with downloads and pier to pier, the publishing industry needs to be next.

    In this case Setright is dead but his copywrite lives on presumably to his heirs.

    What is needed is a central register where copywrite by heirs is acknowledged and then if and when print by demand is brought in they can get their just deserts.

    For anyone who doesn't register the work can be printed and no fees paid.

    Take some of the machine manuals, like the Acme Whirling Gizmo MkII, now this would have been written by the company in say 1950 but the company has gone to the wall, all assets have been sold, the company is no more and most of the workforce are dead.

    Technically someone 'owns' the copywrite to the manuals but who ?

    Unless on cession of trading some individual registers copywrite it's a free for all.

    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  • #2
    I remember his rather erudite writing in 'Bike' magazine back in the mid 70's. Always interesting and insightful, when I first saw his byline I thought it was a nom de plume and a clever play on words (being a motoring magazine) of the popular 'NGK Sparkrite' spark plug of the time.

    John Robinson, sadly also departed, was another excellent engineer-come-journalist when he wrote for Motorcycle Mechanics/Performance Bikes. I think I still have his book on 2-stroke tuning somewhere.

    But I agree, the accumulated knowledge of people like these should not be lost to collectors or stymied by non-beneficial copywrite.

    Peter

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    • #3
      L J K Setright's book

      I agree with John and Peter and not merely Setright's contribution to the unattainable world of exotic motoring.Little did I think that I could even afford a motor car let alone a couple of Mercedes and a -well, a lot of things.
      I recall reading Setright as a Reading Library copy in Motor and Autcar as a break doing my seemingly endless night school homeworks when I left one desk to occupy yet another until the last bus home!

      Now, our Club has a library of sorts and the numbers using it are few and far between. Maybe we know it all or more probably, are simply too old to be 'arsed' to read the past. There is a surprising demand elsewhere for what is 'hidden' in the dust, damp and the yellowing pages of wartime paper.

      My thoughts- and I have had them for a long time- are to copy what I enjoy in Model Engineering and with eager helpers put it on the Net.

      Only the other day- well, days pass- but the Martin Cleeve Swing toolholder design re-emerged. The cost of castings to go abroad to the corners of wherever was simply out of the question. I have now an E-mail to say that a
      swing tool holder is built from my scanning and is on the beach -or near the beach in New South Wales, Australia!

      Clearly, I am probably breaking some law or other by doing this.
      I try to visualise what Kenneth C. Hart or Martin Cleeve might have said had been here today. I read on and noted that he had written, not for the money, but for the willingnesss to pass his knowledge on to others.

      With a touch of pride, I may be spared long enough to continue to pass on his ideas and perpetuate his memory.

      Norman

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      • #4
        most of the time i live within the law. but the two main things keeping most of us there are either/or morals and ethics, or the fear of sanctions - it should never simply be the law itself as it is just a construct intent upon maintaining the status quo. In other words people don't stay within the law because its the law, they do so because either/or their moral position agrees with the law or the consequences of being caught are enough of a deterrent. In certain circumstances like this where you are not interrupting the copyright holders commerce I'd have have neither a moral issue or a fear of sanction and would happily scan away.
        .

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        • #5
          L J K Setright's book

          McG, Thanks yet again.

          Just had another E-mail from " Down under", Dividing and Graduating has just been completed.

          Wot a busy old fart, oi bee?

          Cheers

          Norm

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mcgyver
            most of the time i live within the law. but the two main things keeping most of us there are either/or morals and ethics, or the fear of sanctions - it should never simply be the law itself as it is just a construct intent upon maintaining the status quo. In other words people don't stay within the law because its the law, they do so because either/or their moral position agrees with the law or the consequences of being caught are enough of a deterrent. .
            If it wern't for this attitude social change would never happen. So in most, I do
            say MOST, cases this is good. :-)
            ...lew...

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            • #7
              L J K Setright's book

              Thought that I would add a sort of postscript!

              You will see the start at

              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mlathemods4/files

              Might I add that in the series that there is a large amount of other useful information designed for mainly newcomers?

              Err, Thanks

              Norm

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