Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

suggestions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • suggestions

    I want to build a pump that will filter the fryer oil at work. The kitchen staff tells me that the oil needs to be at 200آ؛F for the proper consistency. I figured a little vane pump would do the trick, but what kind of hoses could i use to resist those temperatures?

    Rob

  • #2
    PTFE core with stainless steel braided outer. We run heat transfer oil into mould tools through these at up to 190 degrees C (375 F).

    Peter

    Comment


    • #3
      i end up going through a lot of food processing plants and am casually aware that in working with machinery & equipment for food, there is a whole set of standards around it regarding materials/components that are used, I can't tell you what the specific issues would be, but I'd make sure what ever advice you act on is specific to food, or that you'd checked them out with someone who knows food processing tech
      .

      Comment


      • #4
        The company I work for makes a lot of processing equipment for end users in the food, dairy and pharmaceutical industries. EVERYTHING that comes into contact with injestible or injectable materials MUST be FDA approved. If it contacts anything dairy related (milk and it's products) it also must comply with USDA guidlines.

        If you want to use something, you'll have to make sure that the materials of construction meet FDA requirements. Usually it means specific plastics / elastomers and stainless steel - typically 304 and 316. Just because it's "Teflon" or silicone doesn't mean it automatically meets FDA rules.

        So, you can't (legally) use a generic vane pump, it has to be rated for food contact.
        Tom

        Be careful what you wish for, you might just get it!

        Comment


        • #5
          [QUOTE=Ausserdog]EVERYTHING that comes into contact with injestible or injectable materials MUST be FDA approved. If it contacts anything dairy related (milk and it's products) it also must comply with USDA guidlines.

          QUOTE]

          I wonder if the cow's teats meets FDA and USDA guidelines.....Hmmmmm???
          RPease

          Comment


          • #6
            Once they have been inspected for mastitis, washed with antibiotic and disinfectant and hooked up to surgical stainless steel milk vacuums they do.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

            Comment


            • #7
              I've used these pumps over the years:
              http://www.proconpumps.com/

              I know they have some that will go up to 190 deg.

              James

              Comment


              • #8
                Well i was going to use a Vane pump that is used to pump Coca-Cola syrup to the dispensors. I totally dismissed the strict rules involving food. However, looking back, a Coca-Cola Vane pump should probably fit the bill.

                Stainless steel, was in the plan, finding a filter for the proper temperature might prove to be a little more difficult.

                Keep the sugestions coming

                Rob

                Comment


                • #9
                  The filter is easy. Use a regular SS food strainer for the big chunks followed by a metal coffee filter for the fine crud. Just make it easy to clean.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/default.asp
                    They will have allthings food grade hose, plastics, piping ect if nothing else. They are a very good source of information get thier print catalog a lot more fun than the web site. they have some pumps. And they ship fast.
                    They all so have the strainers in the lab equiupment section.
                    Glen
                    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Oh geez, I had totally forgotten about those US Plastics guys. I used them back in my PC watercooling days. Thanks for reminding me PT, I've added them to my supplier links page ( http://www.thewarfields.com/MTLinksSuppliers.htm )

                      Best,

                      BW
                      ---------------------------------------------------

                      http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
                      Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
                      http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by spkrman15
                        I want to build a pump that will filter the fryer oil at work. The kitchen staff tells me that the oil needs to be at 200آ؛F for the proper consistency. I figured a little vane pump would do the trick, but what kind of hoses could i use to resist those temperatures?

                        Rob
                        Now that the materials issue has been pretty well addressed, how will you be pumping the hot oil? What pressure is required? If you are just circulating the oil you might consider an impeller-type sump or coolant style pump. Such a pump need only have the pump body and impeller in contact with the oil. the bearings would be well above the surface of the oil and would run cooler. Such an arrangement is common for pumping molten solder.
                        Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                        ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There is another more efficient way to filter but it would take some experimenting to get it right. It has the major advantage of not clogging or needing emptying as often.

                          You spin the oil as it comes out of the pump. This is a centrifugal filter and it separates the chunks from the oil because they are heavier and will spin to the outside of the housing. The oil is fed into the housing from the pump on a tangent at the perimeter of the filter housing. The main outlet for clean oil is from the center top of the housing. At the bottom of the housing are short radial vanes that stick up like pie sections. The crud sinks down along the outer wall and is trapped in the vanes.

                          The air filter on my Land Rover works this way.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X