Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Handling roll of shim stock

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • dbasberg
    replied
    How simple and affective. Thanks.

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Cliff Tanner:
    Some years ago I saw two pieces of flat bent up on both ends, and riveted (bolted?) in the middle to make a circle that could be opened up by turning the two pieces. A roll of music wire was placed inside the circle, the clips cut and the wire unrolled as necessary.

    Never did it myself. . . .your mileage might vary.
    </font>

    Leave a comment:


  • Cliff Tanner
    replied
    Some years ago I saw two pieces of flat bent up on both ends, and riveted (bolted?) in the middle to make a circle that could be opened up by turning the two pieces. A roll of music wire was placed inside the circle, the clips cut and the wire unrolled as necessary.

    Never did it myself. . . .your mileage might vary.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied





    [This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 02-15-2003).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Spin Doctor
    replied
    Dbasberg;
    Enco part #407-8000 At www.direct-line.com

    Leave a comment:


  • dbasberg
    replied
    I am interested to learn what a shim punch is. Perhaps I can make one. If you would enlighten me about what they do and how they are made. TIA

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Spin Doctor:
    Ideally if you are not going to be using all that much shim stock or even if you are the better alternative is to buy shim stock in flat sheets. Precision sells kits of SS, MS, TS and brass sheets of various sizes. Sheets are available in several different width and length combinations. The primary advantage is because it comes flat you are not fighting the spring from being coiled up. They are also available as all one size. Another alternative is if you are not really to worried about exact thickness is to check out the local hobby shop for sheet styrene. That is available in .005,.010,.015,.020,.025 and up.
    And buy all means either make or buy a shim punch
    </font>

    Leave a comment:


  • Spin Doctor
    replied
    Ideally if you are not going to be using all that much shim stock or even if you are the better alternative is to buy shim stock in flat sheets. Precision sells kits of SS, MS, TS and brass sheets of various sizes. Sheets are available in several different width and length combinations. The primary advantage is because it comes flat you are not fighting the spring from being coiled up. They are also available as all one size. Another alternative is if you are not really to worried about exact thickness is to check out the local hobby shop for sheet styrene. That is available in .005,.010,.015,.020,.025 and up.
    And buy all means either make or buy a shim punch

    Leave a comment:


  • Thrud
    replied
    Weirdscience
    I thought so - thats why I prefer the Porter Cable Plunge routers over the others. Better ergonomics and a heavy duty collet - although the Elu/B&D/DeWalt have (or had) a superior collet. For some reason, Porter Cable hides the 3/8" collets on everybody.

    The Milwaukee Magnum 1/2" holeshooter with the cast gear case is the toughest drill I have ever used. Even tougher than my sister's meatloaf.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Thrud,we where talking about women, how to get them to unwrap shimstock,music wire and make meatloaf scones-I think?

    Leave a comment:


  • Thrud
    replied
    Yeah, we rarely get off topic - what were we talking about?

    Leave a comment:


  • Al Messer
    replied
    Speaking of meatloaf, has anyone got a GOOD recipe for Scones?

    Leave a comment:


  • Tibertus
    replied
    Yep lot's of very bright, intelligent and friendly people here willing to discuss metal working or meatloaf. Whatever you need it's right here.

    Peace

    Leave a comment:


  • dbasberg
    replied
    Thanks to all. Plenty of good ideas. Perhaps piano (spring) wire could be captured in a wood container as well. When I get into that; I will try extending the wood container idea to a wire dispenser.

    This board (& the magazine) are a major asset to a new metal worker like myself. My thanks to the magazine for sponsoring this forum and to the great guys who help others.

    I tried rec.metalwork, but a few of their members get verry long winded wayyy off subject (CIA, gun rights, whatever). Sometimes someone mentions metalwork .

    Leave a comment:


  • dbasberg
    replied
    I am a woodworker. The 3 1/2 sided boxes will be made...great idea!

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Forrest Addy:
    The skinny stuff I spiral shim out the center and snip off what I need leaving the cardboard tube in place. As the shim stock gets thicker securing a short piece can be a PITA some times requiring two men for the job without getting the stock all bloody.

    The two stick method works well. Take two 1 x 1 hardwood sticks an inch longer than the width of the shim stock. Drill clearance holes for a couple of #10 carriage bolts at each end. With one stick inside and one out, run in the carriage bolts and spin on wing nuts. Tighten to clamp the roll and keep it from unspooling. Loosen just enough to thread out a piece.

    The clamp keeps the roll from running away too.

    A radius in the face of the inside stick roughly matching the roll ID helps avoid kinks and wrinkles. The wood keeps from scratching up the stock.

    If you're a woodworker, make enough 3 1/2 sided end-less boxes to house all your rolls of shim. Then you can pull it out like foil. Be sure to make the ones for thicker shim stock strong. There's a lot of expansive force trapped in all those coils of shim.

    [This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 02-10-2003).]
    </font>

    Leave a comment:


  • dbasberg
    replied
    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Thrud:
    it in a new coil.

    Guy Lautard outlines this in better detail in his "Bedside Reader".[/B]</font>
    I have all three "Bedside readers, I'll look it up. THX

    Leave a comment:


  • Forrest Addy
    replied
    The skinny stuff I spiral shim out the center and snip off what I need leaving the cardboard tube in place. As the shim stock gets thicker securing a short piece can be a PITA some times requiring two men for the job without getting the stock all bloody.

    The two stick method works well. Take two 1 x 1 hardwood sticks an inch longer than the width of the shim stock. Drill clearance holes for a couple of #10 carriage bolts at each end. With one stick inside and one out, run in the carriage bolts and spin on wing nuts. Tighten to clamp the roll and keep it from unspooling. Loosen just enough to thread out a piece.

    The clamp keeps the roll from running away too.

    A radius in the face of the inside stick roughly matching the roll ID helps avoid kinks and wrinkles. The wood keeps from scratching up the stock.

    If you're a woodworker, make enough 3 1/2 sided end-less boxes to house all your rolls of shim. Then you can pull it out like foil. Be sure to make the ones for thicker shim stock strong. There's a lot of expansive force trapped in all those coils of shim.

    [This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 02-10-2003).]

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X