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Tell me about the Clausing 10" lathe...

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  • Tell me about the Clausing 10" lathe...

    Local seller has a 10X24" Clausing lathe listed- that's the sum total of my information until I can contact the fellow. Don't even have a price.

    Anyone have a photo of one? How good is it, generally speaking?

    I already have a 9" and a 10" Logan, the only things I'm really looking for is a bit more power (both have 1/3rd HP motors and flat belts) a camlok type chuck mount and maybe a bit more rigidity.

    I was really looking for something further up in the 13" or 14" range, but if this is a decent price and a step up from the Logans, I may pick it up and offset it a bit by selling the rarely-used 9" Logan.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  • #2
    I have a 10x30 Clausing/Colchester and its a huge step up from the 10" Logan I had in the beef department. Im having trouble with the compound slide right now, need to figure out what to make the gib out of. Mine has a 2HP motor, 1-3/8" hole through the spindle, QCGB, D1-3 spindle, all the things I wanted. Dont think this is any use to you, just like my lathe is all.

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    • #3
      The preferred lathe of Pennsylvania Gunsmith School.
      http://www.lathes.co.uk/clausing/page6.html
      I've never used a Logan to compare to though.

      Doc, I sent an email regarding changing shipping info LMK if you received it.

      Comment


      • #4
        If it is like the pic from the link, it should be about 4X stiffer than the Logan, which itself is not nearly as light as similar S-B or Atlas.

        The 10" logan has a tad over 3/4" thru-hole. That clausing is quoted with 1 1/8, suggesting that with the right collets it will get up to about 1" capacity.

        Now, an 11" Logan or larger will have a 5C capable spindle, may have hardened ways, full feeds, might have an L or cam lock spindle, etc.

        But the Clausing still should be stiffer and stouter.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #5
          Ah, brain-fart then. Yes, mine has a 1-3/8" (or so) thru-hole, and 5C ready spindle. I couldn't remember if it was the 10" or 11" ones that were the "industrial" Logans- mine used to be a turret lathe and has some long miles on it.

          The 9" has the 3/4" thru-hole. Both have threaded chucks.

          I'm actually quite happy with the 11", it does everything I need it to (except it still cuts a slight taper I have yet to be able to figure out, but it's only an issue on very long items) but I'd like, as I said, a little more power, a cam-lok chuck, and maybe a bit more spindle speed.

          Doc.
          Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Doc Nickel
            Ah, brain-fart then. Yes, mine has a 1-3/8" (or so) thru-hole, and 5C ready spindle.
            The Clausing 4900 is a really nice lathe. 3/4 or 1 HP, v-belt drive, flame hardened ways, 1 1/16" spindle (4C).

            If you want 5C through the spindle, you need to move up to the 5900, which has a 1 3/8" spindle.
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              Talked to the guy, he says it's got a threaded spindle (8 TPI) and he has a lever-type closer with it. Supposedly a 70's model. Has the lantern toolpost and a quickchange, a 4-jaw scroll (yes, scroll, I asked- the jaws can also be moved independently) and a 3-jaw, plus a faceplate. Collet set, some additional tooling. Follow rest, I believe he said. $2,500 for everything. (Mind, this is Alaska- machines are rare and in demand up here, especially good ones.)

              He's supposed to be sending me a photo, so we'll see. I'm less interested since it doesn't have a camlok, but still might jive it a serious look. The one benefit to the threaded spindle is that I can use chucks I already have, like the Buck six-jaw. The V-belt and 1.5HP will also help quite a bit...

              (ponders)

              Doc.
              Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

              Comment


              • #8
                I have a Clausing 4901. It's got a 1 3/4"-8 spindle.

                I've had it for 14 years and it's done everything I put into it. $2500 with all that tooling is worth it if you ask me. I paid $1100 for mine back in '92 and it's more than paid for itself.

                Andy Pullen
                Clausing 10x24, Sheldon 12" shaper, Clausing 8520 mill, Diacro 24" shear, Reed Prentice 14" x 34"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lazlo
                  The Clausing 4900 [has a] 1 1/16" spindle (4C).

                  If you want 5C through the spindle, you need to move up to the 5900, which has a 1 3/8" spindle.
                  ...and...

                  Originally posted by andypullen
                  I have a Clausing 4901. It's got a 1 3/4"-8 spindle.
                  Just to clarify for Doc: the hole through the spindle on the Clausing 4900 is 1 1/16", so you have to use 4C collets, or a 5C chuck.

                  As Andy notes the spindle nose is 1 3/4 -8.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #10
                    I have a 5C chuck for mine because 5C tooling is easier and cheaper to come by than 4C stuff. I've never regretted it. And, Lazlo is correct....it's got a 1 1/16" spindle bore.

                    Andy Pullen
                    Clausing 10x24, Sheldon 12" shaper, Clausing 8520 mill, Diacro 24" shear, Reed Prentice 14" x 34"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lazlo
                      If you want 5C through the spindle, you need to move up to the 5900, which has a 1 3/8" spindle.
                      Which is what I own. A really good machine. I got mine with a 3 jaw chuck and a steadyrest for $900. A major step up from a Southbend 9" or even a a heavy ten.


                      HTRN
                      EGO partum , proinde EGO sum

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by HTRN
                        Which is what I own. A really good machine. I got mine with a 3 jaw chuck and a steadyrest for $900. A major step up from a Southbend 9" or even a a heavy ten.
                        Me too -- I love my 5914. Mike Henry has one also, and so does Matt Isserstadt. Fantastic machine!
                        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          About the only thing that truly annoys me is the $%$# variable speed setup - I have a busted hyd. line, and bleeding it on the early ones is a major pain in the ass. When I get around to it, I think I'll put some type of bleed screw into it, so I can run a line into a jar of Hydraulic fluid, like you do with brakes.


                          HTRN
                          EGO partum , proinde EGO sum

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Fellow sent a picture, it's a Clausing-made Craftsman, and doesn't appear any bigger/more rigid than my Logans. And if it's a 4C spindle, that's a step down from my 11" Logan, which can take 5C's with a right proper Royal lever closer.

                            If it were like that shown in the lathes.co.uk link above, I'd be driving out to go get it right now. But it's really no apparent improvement over my existing machines...

                            Doc.
                            Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              You will pay a premium for any mounting plates you need for chucks because of the odd 1 3/4 X 8 spindle. Also, the taper attachment if present uses a different crossfeed leadscrew than the standard non taper attachment version. Both items are very pricey.

                              Rick

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