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PB Blaster, Liquid Wrench, WD-40

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  • PB Blaster, Liquid Wrench, WD-40

    Do any of these REALLY help to loosen rusted fasteners (e.g. rusted bold on suspension parts)? Has anyone really tried to test these products?

    I have no doubt that it will making removal of the fastener easier once it's loose, but does it actually help to get it unstuck?

    If they do indeed work, then are any of these better than others for that purpose?

    I have people telling me, spray that stuff on and let it soak overnight, and I usually roll my eyes.

    I think Myth Busters should do an episode on this.

  • #2
    Yes, my experience is that Pblaster is a very good product. I have tried several products over the years and PB works. By the way I do mechanical work on trucks, so have tried many brands. JIM
    jim

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    • #3
      I think Kroil is probably the best penetrant product. I haven't run across anything that it hasn't worked on yet. Never tried PB Blaster.

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      • #4
        I have never used PB blaster, but do use Liquid Wrench and Kroil. They are both good penetrating oils, and will loosen rusted fasteners.

        WD40 is less a penetrant and more a preservative and water displacer. It will work as a penetrating oil, as will diesel, and kerosene, but I find Liquid Wrench and Kroil better.

        Overnight will work on light rust, several weeks may be needed for heavier rust. In severe cases, nothing will work.
        Jim H.

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        • #5
          P Blaster has worked for me.

          WD has not

          Liquid wrench has not worked very well.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • #6
            I have used all three even since I was turned on to Kroil many years ago. My father was...ummmm... loaned some by someone at his employer and we used it to unfreeze all 6 pistons in an engine block that had water standing in the cylinders for decades. The key is to keep the pieces wet and give it time to work its way in....sometimes hours or days and not minutes. I still have some of the others around, but consistently reach for Kroil as it penetrates better than anything else I have used. I have this theory that you tend to fill the voids with whatever you use first and that tends to reduce the effectiveness of the other things you may apply, making me want to use what has been most successful from the get-go.

            I use it mixed with a popular bore cleaner for cleaning rifle bores. It became pretty popular with many of the benchrest shooters for this purpose. Given a bit of time, it seems to even penetrate under the lead and copper that galls its way onto the bore surface, improving the performance of the bore solvent.
            Paul Carpenter
            Mapleton, IL

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            • #7
              I've had good experience with PBlaster -- better than WD40 or Liquid wrench.

              Never used Kroil, but I've heard other people over at the Jeep forum say its good.

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              • #8
                Kroil has my vote for spot nut busting, however wd 40 is cheap in the gallon cans and some things need soaked in the stuff and at 4 to 5 times the $ useing Kroil would be nuts.

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                • #9
                  Since it smells so much like kerosene, I suspect that Liquid Wrench is actually largely kerosene. I find it very handy as a lube for tapping into aluminum.

                  -Mark
                  The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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                  • #10
                    Oil of Wintergreen from the drug store works as does Brake fluid
                    George from Conyers Ga.
                    Remember
                    The early bird gets the worm, BUT it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.

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                    • #11
                      Plain ole diesel dipped out of the tractor tank. No fancy labels or canned parfume needed. I've brought a lot of equipment and antique tools back to life with it.

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                      • #12
                        I've used all of the above mentioned over the years and would rate them as follows:

                        1) Kroil
                        2) PB Blaster
                        3) Liquid Wrench
                        4) WD40

                        I buy the Kroil by the gallon for personal use. I'm also a heavy equipment mechanic and use the PB Blaster daily on the job. It goes fast in our shop as most guys grab it and stash a can or two away when the boss buys it. Got him to buy the spray cans of Kroils once. Being restricted to a budget, he buys the WD40 mostly for the cost saving factor. PB Is pretty good in my opinion but is a bit pricey in comparison with the last three.
                        "The men the American people admire most extravagantly are the greatest liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth." H. L. Mencken

                        "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident."

                        "When fear rules, reason and logic are ruled out."

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                        • #13
                          I'm with Ken,the only reason I buy wd-40,is because they don't sell diesel in a spray can,or do they?
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

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                          • #14
                            I love the PB Blaster

                            PB Blaster is great, and can be easily and cheaply had at Autozone. Get it in the gallon cans with the spray bottle, good stuff.
                            James Kilroy

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                            • #15
                              I vote for PB. All penetrants take time. Here is how to speed the removal. Bring nut to red heat with smoke wrench. Throw water on while red or let cool some and use penetrating oil or just motor oil. The heat expansion makes enough gap for the penetrant to work all the way through. If still too tight impact wrench back and forth. The hammering action almost always loosens nut. Last resort wash off sides of nut almost down to threads with cutting torch and knock off with cold chisel. Fasteners installed with blue loctite come off easily as water does not penetrate the threads. Do not reuse fasteners for critical applications that have been "heat treated" in such a mammer.

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