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  • Welding Positioner

    Perhaps I should direct this question to a welding forum,but I thought that I would tap into the collective wisdom of this board first.I am in the preliminary stages of designing a simple rotary welding positioner for welding pipes and flanges in the two to six inch sizes.Depending on the material being welded,currents will be in the 100 to 200 amp range.The question I have is,what would be the best way to build a moveable or sliding contact for the ground to workpiece connection? The rest of the project should be fairly straightforward,but this is the one aspect that has me a little puzzled.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  • #2
    Welding Positioner

    Willy,

    The ones I have seen have been copper contacts that ride on a copper slip ring. The contacts need to be large enough that they carry the current, like a 1/2" square block on a spring rod. This rides on a copper sleve on the shaft that supports the chuck.
    Jim (KB4IVH)

    Only fools abuse their tools.

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    • #3
      Here is a rotary welding table that I built. For the ground, I just used a piece of round brass bar stock that slipped into a piece of tube and it rides against the main spindle tube. Of course, there is a spring inside the tube that maintains the contact between the bar stock and the spindle. It's worked fine for quite a few years. It doesn't work very well when I forget to hook up the ground cable though.

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      • #4
        The one I built I used a metallic bronze brush from a starter motor,loaded with a spring.It just rides right on the spindle behind the chuck.Works like a champ.
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #5
          Thanks a heap for the input guys,your solutions are basically the direction that I was leaning towards as well.I was just a little concerned the it might not carry the current properly but I guess if it can carry a starter load it shouldn't be a problem.As long as I maintain the proper radius on the brush to slip ring juncture and use one of proper size I shouldn't have any arcing problems.Thanks again.
          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

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