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  • Top jaw profiles?

    I've got 2 chucks in sore need of top jaws, so it’s time for me to make my first sets. I’ve got a very nice P&B 3 jaw 6.25” with "American Standard" tongue and groove, and a worn Buck (Logan relabel) 3 jaw 6.25” with the proprietary pattern. Today I picked up some bricks of low carbon mistery metal (all I know is it's steel, and it cuts freely and cleanly on the band saw) today for free, enough for basically 3 sets of soft jaws. Now I have to decide on what profiles to make. I have no hard top jaws, so I'll need a range.

    I know I want to make one set for the P&B ~2" tall, 1" wide, and about 3.5" long with points on one end (how small to make the flat on the point?). That will give me one side to keep relatively pristine for smaller diameter stock. The other side may get less of a point for flipping and use on stuff over 1/4" or so.

    But what of the other sets?

    I'm thinking I'll make a single set of shorter jaws, maybe 3/4" for the Logan since it has more wear. Less leverage that way, though I doubt it will make much difference. Still, it gives different options. And again, pointed on one side, much less so on the other.

    And a final set of tallish ~2" jaws with square ends for larger diameters, these would not be as long as the first set described, maybe only 3" which is only ~0.5" longer than the masters. These would basically match the existing soft tops that came on the P&M and give me options for seating plates and larger diameters without cutting up the pointy sets and consuming them quite as fast.

    I really need to find a set of hard top jaws for the P&B for general loose tollerance turning, but this will have to do me until I can find a decent deal on them.

    Any other suggestions, designs, pics of "good ideas", and so on? Techniques? Setup suggestions? Whatever you think a newbie like me might overlook would be much appreciated...
    Last edited by BadDog; 09-20-2006, 01:44 AM.
    Russ
    Master Floor Sweeper

  • #2
    Make a set of jaws to use now, and machine the bases of several others as blanks to modify at a later date as the need arises.
    Jim H.

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    • #3
      BD,

      Here's what I have done with mine.



      A bit of a pristine picture as they are all machined up now for certain jobs.
      Each jaw has 6 positions and also 3 places on the back jaw so you have a combination of 18 positions of various diameters and radii.

      You can also re-machine as needed or clean up with light passes.
      A new set of jaws isn't that hard to make. I did 6 sets all at one setting so I'm good for a while.



      .
      .

      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



      Comment


      • #4
        Top jaw profiles

        John,

        That is a neat idea! It would be very handy to be able to switch to a different diameter quickly. The wide jaws give you much better gripping power on fragile rings and such. I did notice that the bottom jaws don't have a cross key, however. I wonder if a chuck with the cross key jaws can be set up like this.

        I have also seen something called "pie jaws" for maximum support of fragile parts. They are outrageously expensive if purchased but should not be too hard to build if one has a rotary table.

        I made my soft jaws from 6061 T-6 aluminum. They were easy to machine and I had several sets around with several diameters cut into the faces so all I had to do was "touch them up" a bit to fit any new part.

        Thanks for the good idea,
        Jim (KB4IVH)

        Only fools abuse their tools.

        Comment


        • #5
          JC:
          That’s kinda what I intended in my description. A basic set with points for each chuck, and an extra set of “blocks” for one. I was just wondering if there were some other handy tips that could be incorporated, things I wouldn’t know from my experience but would be really handy to just have lying around ready.

          John:
          Wow, now that’s an interesting set. Almost like pie jaws for moderate diameters. And those back jaws look enormous, with 3 holes too. Haven’t seen one like that. Very nice idea...
          Russ
          Master Floor Sweeper

          Comment


          • #6
            BD,
            The back jaws are just standard softjaws machined up with a tenon and 3 holes for the dowel to fit.

            All the jaws are numbered as are the hexagons and the station on the hexagon.
            This way I can make a note on a card behind the machine which station and which hole is for what job.
            As the station in each hexagon is machined in situ then it guarantees that they run true.

            .
            .

            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



            Comment


            • #7
              Oh, that makes sense. In the pic, it looked like those were the back jaws. Still does really, or are those one piece soft jaws?

              I'll have to coinsider that with my extra top jaws, I like it. Instead of making them so tall, I can make them shorter and maybe even get another set while using what would other wise have been left over. Hmmm...
              Russ
              Master Floor Sweeper

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JCHannum
                Make a set of jaws to use now, and machine the bases of several others as blanks to modify at a later date as the need arises.
                I'll second that. I took the time to program my CNC to make blanks like JC suggests, now all I do is drop in the stock, load the program an out comes two jaw blanks (one in each vise). One end gets a small V for smaller work and the other end is left flat. I make six each time and counter sink the allen bolt holes. I also turned a stack of disks of various diameters to clamp the primary jaws on when cutting the desired profile in the soft jaws. Also number and letter stamp the jaws and record in your log book for future reference, this way if you've turned a set for say 2" you can look them up and use them for other jobs. My big chuck is a little worn so I have them stamped 1,2,3 for each primary jaw. I also only loosen the scroll a half turn or less and get great repeatability.

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