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  • Mounting a wood router to a CNC machine

    Here is my latest project. I wanted to be able to use a wood router on my CNC machine to do some high-speed work. I have a Dewalt vari-speed DW625 router that has a 3 HP motor. Since the quill has the servomotor, I couldn’t just mount it to the side of the head. First thought was to clamp it on the quill but that would cause problems with homing the machine.

    Since I made a bracket to mount to a 40 Taper shell mill holder I needed a way to stop rotation of the plate. I used a linear bearing and needed to machine a holder for the bearing to mount to the head. I just finished it today so I didn’t have a chance to use it but I’m sure it will work just fine. I just need to make sure that I don't try to start the spindle.

    I have added some pictures in case you wanted to see it.

    Jeff








  • #2
    Jeff--

    Nice looking work. Perhaps you should install some sort of switch in the power wire that goes to the spindle motor... that way you have no chance of accidentally turning on the motor.

    Very nice job though. I might try to rig something like that up for my mill. Let us know how it works in terms of accuracy and surface finish.

    --Ben

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    • #3
      That looks cool, should make a nice mess. I would go a step further than Ben suggests and figure out some sort of positive lockout for the spindle power when the adapter is in place.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        Why not clamp around the quill ?
        No need for interlocks or stop bars.

        .
        .

        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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        • #5
          John--

          Some of those open CNC mills 'home' by fully retracting the quill. If something is clamped to it, it won't be able to retract and you'll end up with busted gears or feed-screws.

          --Ben

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          • #6
            Quill needs to home

            On this machine when the machine is homed, the quill must reach a limit switch. My first thought was to re-adjust the limit switch but then again the controller know how much range of travel it has and when it would go the other direction it would hit the hard stop which causes the servo motors to disconnect. The only solution I had was to mount it to the tool holder and add the rod to stop rotation.

            Evan - I'm thinking of adding a limit switch that will trigger when the rod is installed and disconnect the power to the motor. I will need to look at it since it is a three phase two speed motor. Not sure how many wires I need to disconnect due to the two speed motor.

            Comment


            • #7
              stopping the motor

              Jeff,
              Your limit switch should be connected to the motor starter that operates the spindle motor, not to the motor wires themselves. The starter/contactor probably has 2 coils and a mechanical interlock for the 2 speeds, so the easiest way to prevent operation would be to break the common wire on the 2 coils.

              Maybe I need to stop over and look at it. :-)

              Comment


              • #8


                I made a spyder of a mount, put a bar on top to slide into a collet..

                Worked once for a wooden carved sign.. not used it since.
                Excuse me, I farted.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Added Limit switch

                  Well, taking the advice of Evan and really didn't need the help of Jim :-) (even though he has help me many times in the past) I added a limit switch today and tested it all out. There was four contactors that controlled Forward/reverse/high/low. I just found which wire went to each of them and hooked that to the limit switch before the first contactor.

                  Here are some picture on of the final project and the first 3-D cut using a 1/8 carbide ball cutter and some G-Codes I found on the internet.

                  Jeff







                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That is extremely cool. Now I really must get my CNC going. Would you mind telling what that material is?

                    I've been messing with software and have been generating G-codes for milling gears, in particular change gears for my SB9. I have already cranked out the code for a 37/47 tooth metric transposing gear. It will need a 1/16" end mill to cut it in aluminum or brass and a high speed spindle will be nice so it doesn't take a week.

                    Once I get things up and running and have a chance to test the codes I will make them available.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Plastic

                      Evan,

                      I'm 95% sure it is delrin. I was at an auction and some guy purchased a wall full of aluminum, brass & plastic. He was just going to scrap the metal and approached him and asked him if he wanted to sell the plastic. He told me to make him a offer so I said $50.00. He said "sold". What is not pictured was a full sheet of 1/4 lexan still with the protective paper, a large round piece of nylon 18" in diameter and 24" long and a bunch of lenghts of round and angle stock in plastic. I used some of it on projects and sold one piece of brown delrin 6" diameter 12" long on ebay for $48.00.

                      What is one the shelves below in order

                      Rubber
                      Delrin
                      UHMW
                      UHMW/PVC
                      Acrylics/Peek/odd stuff
                      Nylons
                      Some Black stuff is something for the food business that machines like a charm I use that stuff to check out cutter paths.

                      Jeff


                      [/IMG]

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                      • #12
                        Holy cow! That's a small fortune in plastics. Are you sure the bottom shelf isn't Delrin or some type of acetal? There aren't that many plastics that come in true black and machine as nice as acetal. That stuff is expensive to be using as "machinable wax".
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Evan
                          Holy cow! That's a small fortune in plastics. Are you sure the bottom shelf isn't Delrin or some type of acetal? There aren't that many plastics that come in true black and machine as nice as acetal. That stuff is expensive to be using as "machinable wax".

                          I'm no expert but I thought Delrin was just a trade name for acetal? Anyway it looks and sounds like black acetal. The black doesn't have as high as lubricity as the white acetal but still machines very nicely, the white is almost waxy. By the way, is the reason for mounting the router that the router has a much higher rpm than the mill? I was thinking with acetal you could just get 1/8" inch (and/or 1/4" i forget which is most standard for routers) r8 collet and use the router bits in the mill with about the same results and alot less bother? I could see if you want to make a whole seperate cnc router that could emboss designs on an entire 4'x8' sheet of wood or plastic but if your gonna use the mill why not use the mill? Forgive my ignorants
                          “It was not til Leibniz and Newton, by the discovery of the differential calculus, had dispelled the ancient darkness which enveloped the conception of the infinite, and had clearly established the conception of the continuous and continuous change, that a full and productive application of the newly found mechanical conceptions made any progressâ€‌

                          Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894)

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                          • #14
                            Delrin is acetal homopolymer. Generic acetal is normally acetal copolymer. They have slightly different properties. Both are available in natural (white) and true black and have similar machining properties.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Evan
                              Delrin is acetal homopolymer. Generic acetal is normally acetal copolymer. They have slightly different properties. Both are available in natural (white) and true black and have similar machining properties.
                              I majored in chemical engineering for a year and took some classes in organic and polymer chemistry even after that but I don't recall much about homopolymers. But thats probably just my faulty memory and lack of actually using the knowledge, I will have to do some internet searching to brush up I guess. The actual difference seems pretty negligable for practical use. The enco catalog on page 643 does say, " ACETAL, also known as Delrin..." but then again salesmen often are fast and loose with product specifications...
                              “It was not til Leibniz and Newton, by the discovery of the differential calculus, had dispelled the ancient darkness which enveloped the conception of the infinite, and had clearly established the conception of the continuous and continuous change, that a full and productive application of the newly found mechanical conceptions made any progressâ€‌

                              Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894)

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