Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shop press on the cheap...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Shop press on the cheap...

    About a year ago I was really wanting a small hydraulic press for my basement shop. I went to one of the Cummins traveling tool shows to see the one they had for $120. How bad could it be??? Very bad...

    About a month or so later, during a routine dumpster-diving mission, I chanced upon a fairly heavy, solidly welded frame made of 2X4X1/4 steel tubing. I think it may have been from a plant entance sign or somesuch. As soon as I saw it, I knew it was destined for a higher calling

    I shortened the original legs and used those cutoffs for the crossmember and the bottom stabilizers. I found a can of heavy duty springs at a thrift store for $1. Made a bunch of punches/dies from an old barbell I had laying around. Only things actually purchased were the 4 eyebolts and 12 ton hydraulic jack. Totalled less than $20!!!

    I tested the frame with a 20 ton jack and it didn't flex at all. I now use it with a 12 ton jack just to have a nice fat safety factor. They only possible drawback in the limited verticle range (12"), but it hasn't held me back yet. It can accomidate 26" in width, which on my small scale is plenty.

    Once you have something like this you truly wonder how you ever got by without one. I use pressfits in so many projects now it makes my head spin!

    We finally got highspeed DSL this week, so you'll probably see more pics from me in the future. I hope this first one works okay...Sidegrinder

    IMG]http://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k203/sidegrinder/shoppress002.jpg[/IMG]

  • #2
    It'll work when you put a bracket at the start of the line.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

    Comment


    • #3
      Ya,what Evan said

      Presses are on the shop list of must haves.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

      Comment


      • #4
        As in:
        Last edited by winchman; 10-06-2006, 06:00 PM.
        Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

        Comment


        • #5
          Ahhh that's better
          I just need one more tool,just one!

          Comment


          • #6
            Hey thanks Winchman--I figured somebody would come to my rescue if (when) I goofed it up.

            Comment


            • #7
              I can respect a guy that has to stop and look in the dumpsters around the manufacturing places.

              Yup, nice little setup. I bought one a while back and used it the first day I had it. I would say that it has paid for itself a few times over.

              Sure beats hitting the stuff with a hammer till it mushrooms so bad it wont never come apart.

              Good show!
              rock-
              Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thats odd. I've seen alot of different shop presses but few indeed look like they were designed by an actual degreed mechanical engineer. For your information, its applying all loads on the weakest axis of the structural members. Of course you got it for free so no biggy, just saying that if those are 6" x 3" members they are (practically speaking) only as strong as a frame made of 3"x3" members because the 6" strong axis is negligibly loaded while all the main loads are acting on the weak axis. Of course even professional presses often have this weak kneed design simply because they are made of channels which only come in certain sizes and a certain amount of room is needed not for strength on the unloaded axis but for mounting stuff.
                Last edited by Mortimerex; 10-06-2006, 11:56 PM.
                “It was not til Leibniz and Newton, by the discovery of the differential calculus, had dispelled the ancient darkness which enveloped the conception of the infinite, and had clearly established the conception of the continuous and continuous change, that a full and productive application of the newly found mechanical conceptions made any progressâ€‌

                Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894)

                Comment


                • #9
                  It may be cheap but if it works and performs a purpose, it solves a problem. I still use this shop-built press for a lot of things. It's since been converted to a power hammer but I left the top sliding plate and cylinder pin for use as a press. It was a slavage yard "kit" and solves problems.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That last picture is of a more proper design, structurally speaking. At least the bottom channels are oriented correctly, however most of the members are "square" so it is like the original picture -weak where it is loaded the most and strong where the loads are always magnitudes lesser. In simple terms, such designs may look more aesthetic but weigh excessive amounts for their pathetically poor strength (as compared to an actual well engineered design).
                    “It was not til Leibniz and Newton, by the discovery of the differential calculus, had dispelled the ancient darkness which enveloped the conception of the infinite, and had clearly established the conception of the continuous and continuous change, that a full and productive application of the newly found mechanical conceptions made any progressâ€‌

                    Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Mortimerex, your points are all well taken. I will hold off sending you a "Sidegrinder's $20 Shop Press Rocks!" tee shirt until you come around

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Portability and therefore strength to weight ratio isn't an important factor in these tools. Sure, it's possible to achieve the same strength with much less material but why go to the extra trouble? I think sidegrinders press is exactly what I need for my shop. It's simple and easy to build. It isn't a bridge and marginal safety factors or material saving aren't important. Functionality is and it looks perfectly functional.

                        If it had to fly then maximum weight saving and most efficient use of material would matter. It doesn't need to fly.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          6"x3" members(tubes) loaded the wrong way are NOT practically equivalent to 3"x3" members.(tubes) You have twice as much material at the extreme fiber. Furthermore, I would guess that if you take the time to calculate Z for both orientations of a 6"x3" tube, there will be less than 20% difference. (Bad guess on my part-See Michael Moores post below.)Additional material at the extreme fiber makes up for some of the loss of distance from the neutral axis.
                          While I also prefer to see members loaded the "correct" way, there is nothing wrong with recycling a free part, testing it far above the working load, and moving on. Best of all, Sidegrinders dies will be more stable sitting on the 6" width of the base beam.

                          Scott

                          (Edits in parenthesis, to clarify my meaning, and to humbly accept a dope slap from Michael Moore)
                          Last edited by SVS; 10-08-2006, 02:05 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Actually, if those are channels a 6x3 in its weak orientation its weaker than a 3x3" tube of same average thickness because it has no "flange" -far fewer fibers on the outer extent. Section properties of 6x3x 3/8" structural tube (just an example) Sx= 7.92cu.in, Ix= 23.8, Sy=5.19cu.in Iy= 7.78. That doesn't seem like alot of difference but just that the strong part of the beam is exceptionally lighter loaded while most load is being transmitted along the weak axis means its arse backwards at best. But Evan was right that presses arent often moved. Just saying if you ever do want to move one its gonna be one heavy load for its strength. I think it is of at least some concern in the size of small shop press you were talking about which is more likely to be moved around alot.
                            Last edited by Mortimerex; 10-07-2006, 10:09 AM.
                            “It was not til Leibniz and Newton, by the discovery of the differential calculus, had dispelled the ancient darkness which enveloped the conception of the infinite, and had clearly established the conception of the continuous and continuous change, that a full and productive application of the newly found mechanical conceptions made any progressâ€‌

                            Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sidegrinder
                              Mortimerex, your points are all well taken. I will hold off sending you a "Sidegrinder's $20 Shop Press Rocks!" tee shirt until you come around
                              I think it rocks, so you can send me one
                              Nice job.

                              Peter

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X