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'nother dividing head question

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  • 'nother dividing head question

    Not long ago I acquired a nice Hardinge dividing head and the collection of seven plates. I've divided some things with it and it's SO much more solid and easy to use than my little spin index that I'm really glad to have it, for sure.

    But I do have one question - it has a 4:1 ratio, while all the others I've seen are 40:1. Why is that? Is it a matter of all the others accommodating a wider range of divisions with fewer plates?
    Cheers,

    Frank Ford
    HomeShopTech

  • #2
    4:1 is an interesting ratio. How do they accomplish that?

    Most dividing heads use 40:1, I suspect, due to size limitations and the fact that it is now a standard ratio. Rotary tables use 40:1, 60:1 or 90:1 with some high precision ones using even higher numerical ratios.
    Jim H.

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    • #3
      Frank

      I suspect that the 4/1 dividing heads were primarily meant to do coarse divisions, fast spirals, and groove cams. In production that would be a whole lot less cranking.
      Gear train from table lead screw would be simpler too.

      Here is the URL of a Hardinge manual discussing the 4/1.
      http://www.bbssystem.com/manuals/Dividinghead.pdf

      JC
      A four start worm on a 16 tooth wheel, is one guess.
      i doubt if they used spur gears.

      Hth Ag

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