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OT: 1st night of CPAP: Hooverhead inaugural

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  • OT: 1st night of CPAP: Hooverhead inaugural

    Well, I've gone and done it. The med supply company sent a rep to my work yesterday with my CPAP machine, and gave me the rundown on care and feeding. My insurance is covering all the freight, including consummables. They set me up with a unit that has the gradual pressure ramp-up to help you get to sleep, and this neat feature that backs the pressure off a little on exhale to make it easier. It also has a heater in the humidifier, but I don't use that feature. The rep showed me how to set the pressure, too, because that's the way the sleep doc wrote the scrip. It takes data on a smart card, indicating frequency and total time of usage, number of apnea-type events, and a bunch of other stuff. Every 6 months or so, I can send them the card, and they dump the data and give it to my doc to make sure all is ok.

    Obviously, some smart folks have spent a lot of time on the problem of sleep apnea and CPAP machines. Wow. I even had a coworker say I look improved today. My coworkers are not known for being falsely nice, and I have no power, so I don't get brown-nosed.

    I just want to thank all of the OT posters here that pitched into the various discussions of CPAP. It was that and a particularly bad week for my apnea that finally got me to start the ball rolling. I'm getting used to the machine (only my 2nd night, including the sleep study), but I like it. So much, in fact, that I could probably sell them...

    Case in point - I have a slight back injury incurred in the shop last month. I was talking to the lady in the surgeon's office to schedule a repair, and the subject of CPAP and apnea came up. Turns out her husband has to sleep 2 floors away because of his problem. I told her the short version of my story, and suggested the sleep doc I use. I'm no doctor, but her husband's problems had a familiar sound to them, so I suggested her getting it checked out. He suffers all the usual symptoms, and also headaches. Life is too short to go through it suffering a completely treatable problem.

    I know the OT stuff annoys some of us here, but I want to again extend my sincere thanks for the wealth of information contributed here, both on and off topic. You folks are great - Thanks again.

    -Mark

    Eyes wide open. Wow.
    The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

  • #2
    I have been using cpap 17 years now you get so you can't sleep without it good luck Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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    • #3
      I have been on CPAP since Feburary. I first went to the doctor because I had been in a severe depression for quite some time. I found it stange at the time that he first suggested a sleep test but he was right. Six weeks after getting my machine I felt like a new man. It bothers me a little to know that I am totally dependant on a machine (can't sleep without it) but it is better than being in the loonie bin.
      To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

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      • #4
        I have been using a CPAP for about 3.5 years.

        G.A. I can relate to what you say about being totally dependent on the CPAP. It does bother me also. There is no way for me to sleep without it.

        My machine has a power pack that delivers 12V DC to the unit. A couple days after Katrina, I built an adaptor to plug into the cigarette lighter in my truck. I can use that to get some sleep if needed. I also have a small generator I can use for power failures.

        We had a power outage last night from bad weather and I had to wait till power came back on to go to sleep. Did not feel like going to the truck or firing up the generator. My two laptop batteries lasted till the power was restored so I had something to do.

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        • #5
          My CPAP didn't work out for me. My problem is central apnea, not obstruction, and then only when I sleep on my back which I never do unless I wear it, so all the CPAP did was keep me and my wife awake.

          It's good though that you have a recording type machine. I'd wanted one but my insurance company decided what kind and what features I'd be getting and that was that. It's basically a blower for hose heads.

          Everyone I know who has one has remarked that they've never slept better and all take them along in their Harley tour paks when the go on cross-country rides. That says something.

          To put it on topic: Don't use machinery if you are sleepy!

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          • #6
            I have been sleeping with the same misstress for about 6 years now. The only way that I can sleep without her is if I am sittting up and sometimes that does not work.

            Glad it is working out for you.
            Don\'t ask me to do a dam thing, I\'m retired.
            http://home.earthlink.net/~kcprecision/

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            • #7
              glad you took the step! I've been a hose-head about 7 years now. I just got the same machine you got I think. I needed it because the constant blower type had me trying to exhale against the pressure of the machine (11 litres) and that caused my lips to part.

              You might find that now you have to learn how to sleep without tossing and turning due to the mask. This left me very sore in the morning. I had to buy a 3" memory foam cover for my firm mattress. It suspends your body perfectly for when you aren't tossing around all night and it's really a comfortable setup. also got a memory foam pillow that doesn't interfere with my mask.

              One tip that might help you, my DME tells me the straps should only be adjusted tight enough to keep the mask from falling off your head. Get it too tight on the bottom and it pops up on the top. Too tight on top and the bottom pops up. The mask also works best of a freshily washed face so you may find yourself washing up before going to bed as opposed to in the morning. (maybe you do both and one at the midnight hour )

              If I can help you with anything don't hesitate to email me.
              - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
              Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

              It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

              Comment


              • #8
                There is no way for me to sleep without it.
                I'm afraid that is true for me, and it sure eliminates taking a spontaneous nap. We're hoping to take a trip to Australia, and I've got some concerns about 20+ hours awake on the plane coupled with the time at each end and no ability to use the CPAP to sleep on the plane.

                I used the "ramp up" when I started, but I think you'll find as I did that eventually you'll be accustomed to the machine and you'll go straight to full pressure from the start. I don't have much problem with an open mouth as I also brux, so my teeth are usually clamped tight on my night-guard. At least the two problems are working together, instead of against each other.

                If you have problems with the mask look into the Breeze "occipital crest" type of headgear. It is still annoying, but at least the hose runs between the top of your head and end of the bed so you don't roll into it. The nasal plugs seem harder to dislodge if you turn your face into the pillow than is the case for the mask.

                You'll learn to not drag covers up near the exhaust port. On mine that just reflects a noisy blast of air back at me which usually wakes me up.

                cheers,
                Michael

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                • #9
                  Does any of those appliances help if you can't sleep through the night. I get maybe 4-5 hours everynight then wake up and stay up.

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                  • #10
                    I too am not able to sleep w/o cpap. If I use the ramp feature I find my self choking before it comes up to pressure. In case of power failure I keep an auto. batt, under my night stand. It will last about two nights at least ( I haven't actually run it down yet). A small charger used every so often keeps it topped off. I have been through several machines as I have used cpap since the early '90s.
                    As I said preveously it is a love/hate relationship.
                    Good luck.
                    Jim

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by gearhead
                      Does any of those appliances help if you can't sleep through the night. I get maybe 4-5 hours everynight then wake up and stay up.
                      Try this place here and take their test. It will give you some idea. If you need to take a sleep study understand that there is nothing to it. Very simple test. Note, there are quite a few detractors in the test so try to be sure of your answers. A few of the questions if answered in the affirmative show that you do not have apnea.

                      http://www.sleepnet.com/sleeptest.html
                      Last edited by Your Old Dog; 11-17-2006, 04:46 AM.
                      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                      Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                      It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Being a gearhead, has anyone tried a Rootes blower ?? although the V8 will probably keep you awake.

                        .
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                        • #13
                          What a night. I went to bed pretty much at the usual time, maybe later. I remember waking a couple of times and adjusting the mask and such. I woke up before either alarm went off, unable to go back to sleep. Well, "unable" may be the wrong word - I simply didn't feel the need. I called my doctor's office with kind words this morning - it's never occurred to me to want to tip a doctor before. I'm not exactly on Cloud 9, but I'm impressed that I awoke so easily and feel so rested.

                          The tech that set me up with the machine said that the biggest mistake people make with CPAP is overtightening the mask. I didn't take long to figure that out myself - the pressure on my sinuses makes it impossible to breathe.

                          And veering slightly toward topic... What kind of blower or pump do these things use? It's quite good at delivering a solid, steady pressure, and it makes no noise other than air going through the hose. It doesn't seem like it has the "slippage" that a fan would, but it's way to smooth to be something like a piston or diaphram pump. Could it be, as John Stevenson suggests, a roots blower or some such?

                          I'd take the machine apart and find out myself, like I normally do, but I don't want to risk messing it up.

                          -Mark
                          The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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                          • #14
                            I was thinking more like one of these.



                            ::

                            .
                            .

                            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Does any of those appliances help if you can't sleep through the night. I get maybe 4-5 hours everynight then wake up and stay up.
                              It pains me when I hear of folks who cannot sleep, because I know the hell they are going through. I had the same problem for many years. On day shift I would wake up at 2:30 every morning; swings and graveyards were worse. I blamed it onto rotating shift work; but, after switching to straight day shift, things didn't improve.

                              Now, I sleep like a log until 6:00 a.m. The difference?

                              * A mild anti-depressant at bedtime. (Every single person in my blood-line has a history of melancholia. Depression can be at the root of sleeplessness.)
                              * Melatonin at bed-time.
                              * No coffee past noon.
                              * No alcohol past 6:00 p.m. (But, since the "couple of tokes" thread, on Practical Machinist, I went on the wagon, cold turkey.)
                              * No heavy meals in the evening, especially big steaks.
                              * Retirement. The first few weeks after retiring I'd sleep until 8:00-9:00 a.m.

                              Now, every morning when I wake up I tell myself, "It's a blessing to get a good night's sleep."

                              Orrin
                              So many projects. So little time.

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