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  • Parting off tool options???

    Hey guys! I broke my ol' brazed carbide cutoff tool today. I'd ground it back so many times there was almost nothing left of the tip and the brazed joint failed.
    All in all it wasn't bad for a cheap POS but it was never long enough to cut anything over 1 1/4" dia.
    I've also used the original SB cutoff tool holder/blade and was never too impressed with it in the rocker tool post on the ol' SB.
    I looked in the KBC catalog today for an insert type cutter. Now I'm really confused. Anywhere from $100 to $500....what to do?
    They have the "T" type blades that require a toolblock but they don't have a block for my square toolpost that uses 5/8" tools....sort of an oddball???
    What would you all suggest?
    I'd hate to buy an expensive cutoff tool and find out it didn't work that well in my somewhat shakey 14X40 (narrow bed model). It's far more solid than my SB9 was but pales in comparison to a "real" lathe.
    It does perform well with carbide turning inserts so I'm ok with popping a few bucks for a good setup.
    What do you all have to say?
    Thanks!
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    I have the piston Aloris knock off that Enco runs on sale all the time and I like it very well. It comes with a cut off holder that also seems to work well. I've got 2 different width plain style blades and a "T" style blade which all work very well and are easily changed as well as being cheap and easily acquired. I've used these on my marginal Griz 9x20 and also on my much more robust Rockwell 11x37 with great results and have not yet broken a blade.
    Russ
    Master Floor Sweeper

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    • #3
      BD...I wish we had an Enco up here.
      Any of the Aloris type tool holders are worth a fortune in Canada.
      I actually like the square turret type tool post on this lathe but the 5/8" tool deal is a bummer.
      I'd like to keep this setup but have to deal with the oddball size.
      Russ
      I have tools I don't even know I own...

      Comment


      • #4
        Here's the quickchange block I made to fit my A-size post on my 11" Logan:



        Takes an ISCAR insertable parting blade (sorry, I don't have the size or part number off the top of my head, but it's about 1-1/4" wide.)



        It's been one of the most handy blocks I've made for the toolpost. Height stop is fixed, blade is clamped at the bottom with four countersunk 1/4"-20 screws.

        The insertable blades are kind of expensive, but in my opinion they're well worth it.

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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        • #5
          Options

          Torker:
          I see several options. IIRC there was an article in HSM or machinist workshop about K-balling old carbide tipped wood saw blades with missing teeth. You cut out pieces that look like a cut off tool viola you have carbide tiped cut off blade. Not sure of the grade of carbide and have not personaly tried it.
          Little machine shop .com sells a neat little block for 1/2 cut off bits.

          http://www.littlemachineshop.com/pro...ProductID=1551

          Or you or your apprentice could make one using the photo as a guide to fit your 5/8 tool.
          I have an Aloris type wedge style set of for the 9" SB and a A2Z CNC qc set up for the little 7x 10 mini lathe IMHO QC tool posts are the way to go. Yes 4 way tool blocks are a a bit stiffer.
          Hope This helps
          Regards
          Tin
          Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

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          • #6
            I built a tool holder for my 12X36 Gear Head, with 1/2" tool plst, using woodruff cutters to make a groove to hold a "T" type blade (one for P2, one for P3) and it works well. If you like, I think I can find the origional sketch and skan it for you.
            Steve

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            • #7
              I've got one of the fancy Aloris cut off tools. I like it real well:



              Sometimes its a bit too large so I also use these little pre-ground HSS tools a guy on eBay sells. The seller is "samsws" (no connection to me). They plug right into a normal tool holder as they're just preground from blanks. They're nice.

              Here is one currently listed: 300050541456

              They work well and 3 for $14 isn't too bad a price. If that auction is no longer listed try searching for

              Cut-Off Parting & Grooving Mini Lathe Tool

              Best,

              BW
              ---------------------------------------------------

              http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
              Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
              http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html

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              • #8
                Check out Ebay auction 290052067520. Seem a bit steep, but just what your looking for I think...
                Russ
                Master Floor Sweeper

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                • #9
                  Guys! Thanks for the ideas and links. That one cutoff tool on Fleabay...the guy shouldn't show such nice pictures.
                  Now I'm going to make my own holder for an insert type cutter.
                  I wasn't sure how they held the blade in but now I see(too bad for him... )
                  The same setup would work for the "T" style cutters. I may try one of those also.
                  I don't mind spending a bit of money but those blocks are really steep up here....for what they are.
                  Sometimes I forget that we can build a lot of our own stuff.
                  The time factor is a constant battle but for this...I can find the time.
                  Might be a good project for the helper
                  Thanks again!
                  Russ
                  I have tools I don't even know I own...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I took a closer look and realized the price isn't that bad when you count the 10 carbide bits I missed on my first scan through. And he sells just the holder block for around $25 along with the blade/holder for about the same. Those bits though were $4 ea. for 10, so that added $40, making the starting price fairly reasonable. I wouldn't make either of the main parts for $25 each unless I just wanted to piddle around with it...
                    Russ
                    Master Floor Sweeper

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BadDog
                      I took a closer look and realized the price isn't that bad when you count the 10 carbide bits I missed on my first scan through. And he sells just the holder block for around $25 along with the blade/holder for about the same. Those bits though were $4 ea. for 10, so that added $40, making the starting price fairly reasonable. I wouldn't make either of the main parts for $25 each unless I just wanted to piddle around with it...
                      Agreed....but it would cost me about double the asking price to get it up here to the frozen North.
                      I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                      • #12
                        Sorry, haven't you guys learned how to grind a "Cutoff Tool", yet. There are going to be situations you need to Bury a tool 1.5 deep and .020 wide to conserve stock, in order to create a profit? Excellent ratio, by the way. Get out of this train of thought...if a major corporation made MY tooling...then it will work for me. You should know better.

                        Anyone who relies on Corporation's tooling...shows me they have NOT had enough Hands On training.
                        Last edited by Millman; 11-19-2006, 03:10 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Here is another Iscar parting tool. It has a 1/2 square shank so it fits my AXA size post. They have one like it at work so I bought one of my own.

                          The limitations are depth of cut but it is a sturdy tool not likely to snap off the insert.
                          Jim
                          So much to learn, so little time

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                          • #14
                            Yes, those are nice, for certain dimensions only. They are designed for production use in a very limited frame. Will you use that tooling to part 6" tubing with 1.75 wall thickness running 400 RPM? Not likely, even in CNC. Why spend hundreds of dollars on a damn tool that is not adaptable to every use?

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                            • #15
                              [[not likely to snap off the insert]] Why would you say that? Any tooling arrangement that Snaps off inserts, is the operators fault. Don't blame it on the tooling. Like I say...the tooling is only as good as the set-up man's common sense.

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