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Deburring tool...who'da thunk???

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  • Deburring tool...who'da thunk???

    I've always used a file for beburring but after watching the two young machinists at work...they always use those wimpy looking lil' deburing tools...I thought...what the heck, I'd try one.
    Bought the Shaviv "Mango" outfit...mostly cuz the ad said it looked pretty and probably worked.
    It came in the mail today just as my helper showed up for work.
    While she was milling a block square I started fooling with the thing.
    Couldn't get the blades in, yada, yada...got bitched at from the gurl cuz I'm too stubborn to read the directions. Okay...finally gave up and read the rules...git the blade in.
    Stoopid thing...blade all floppin around. When she had one side of the block machined I bellied up to the bar...to show the noobie how to deburr a damm piece of metal.
    Ooops...couldn't get it to work. Tried til it finally got the burr off but I could have done it quicker with a file.
    Threw the stoopid tool on the bench and told her to take a crack at it after she finished the other side.
    About 30 seconds into the ordeal she had slivers flying and a beautiful finished edge.
    After the block was done I marveled at the finish...far better than the usual file job that I do.
    After she left I started to practice with the "Mango" again. Guess I was trying to overpower it and wasn't using the little ball deal on the end to guide it.
    Now I can't believe I never bought one of these years ago.
    What a time saver...in a small package! Pretty funny though...how the noobie showed me up with "my" new toy
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    I just got one of those silly things myself. Haven't tried it yet. I'm a file guy too.

    Best,

    BW
    ---------------------------------------------------

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    • #3
      That's a funny story.....I use mine all the time and still don't know how to use it properly.....it's hit or miss with me, sometimes nice, sometimes gouged.

      .......The little ball deal is used as a guide huh?

      Good on ya....nice to pick up a new trick now and then.

      John

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ZINOM
        That's a funny story.....I use mine all the time and still don't know how to use it properly.....it's hit or miss with me, sometimes nice, sometimes gouged.

        .......The little ball deal is used as a guide huh?

        Good on ya....nice to pick up a new trick now and then.

        John
        John...I "think"...from watching the gurl....you have to let the tool do the work the way it was designed. Seems to me that she wasn't holding it as straight as I was....she had a lot more angle to the block and let the ball be the guide to the depth of cut. Just guessing here.
        I'll have to get further lessons next time she comes to work.
        Russ
        I have tools I don't even know I own...

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        • #5
          Damn,,, now i find out what that little "ball deal" is for, makes sense, the things you learn on here...

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          • #6
            What ball? I haven't seen a ball on my Shaviv, though I don't have the Mango. In any case, I've got a B10 and B20 that came with it and I like it very well. I just ordered a set of 10 of the steel blades (B10 IIRC?) since they are HSS and I can certainly tell the steel blade has grown dull.
            Russ
            Master Floor Sweeper

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            • #7
              Don't know....these blades all have a ball on the end.
              I have tools I don't even know I own...

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              • #8
                You guys are just now discovering deburring knives?

                Okay, two tips: 99.9% of the blades are meant for right-handers, and operate on the pull.

                Hold the part with the edge to be deburred perpendicular to you- as in, pointing towards/away from you. Put the swivel blade on the edge, as 'level' across the edge as possible. Then, just draw the handle towards you in one smooth, quick motion. The blade should trail behind the handle a bit.

                I've found that, on aluminum, just a tiny bit of oil on the blade helps.

                Use the same motion and in the same direction, on any surface. Go clockwise in holes. It works great, saves time and typically gives a more consistent finish than a file.

                I've had mine for literally eighteen years (since '88 when I worked at a foundry) and I've been using it put-near daily for at least four or five years. Since I use it mostly on aluminum, the blades last forever. I finally switched the original about a year ago when I was doing some stainless parts.

                Doc.
                Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                • #9
                  Who say's you can't teach an old dog new tricks. Deburring tools are simple, fast and if you're not careful capable of slicing your hands up. The blades for steel and brass both work well for their intended purposes but most of the other ideas (the keyway tool and others) are somebody's idea of a joke.
                  Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Doc Nickel
                    You guys are just now discovering deburring knives?

                    Okay, two tips: 99.9% of the blades are meant for right-handers, and operate on the pull.
                    Another trick is that you can use a deburring blade to put a small countersink on a hole -- but you have to rotate the work and keep pulling the blade towards you. If you try to rotate the blade around the hole, it gets jagged on the opposite side, when you're pulling away from you.

                    ...and yeah, you can get a nasty cut from them -- I was in a hurry, pulled the blade too fast, and caught the hooked blade on the web of my left thumb (holding the work) -- don't do that
                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                    • #11
                      Torker:
                      I have one of the deburing tools and use it with no problem. Great for deburing a bore while the part is still on the lathe just spin the chuck by hand I would not us it on the lathe under power that is what a file is for. Also use it for square blocks. When I worked in the precision shop we used a tiangular scraper for deburing . I has better control . Looks like a triangular file with no teeth. Broken end mills are great to for smaller holes . Use the style that the shank is bigger than the cutting diameter. And yes files are good to. In school that was what we used.
                      A buddy actualy gave one to me several years ago.He ordered one from one of the mail order supply houses. He paid for one they shipped a box of a dozen what a deal!!
                      They make deburring sets for a reason the need changes with the job and material. Also somewhat a matter of preference
                      Regards Tin
                      Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

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                      • #12
                        Yep, the most dangerous tool in the shop,if you dont respect it.

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                        • #13
                          So Russ ... how 'bout some pictures of this helper - err i mean deburring tool in action...

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                          • #14
                            Torker
                            Try inserting a small spring inside tool shank under cutting blade, this keeps enough pressure on tip to prevent its swiveling around. Dont forget to hold blade wwhen releasing or you will be looking for it.
                            John
                            johnny o

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                            • #15
                              They are wonderful tools.
                              As Doc said, they work better if you tilt the handle and "Draw" the blade behind..not much tilt though. also the secret for doing holes is to develope a wrist action..do not be TIGHT..like white guys dancing..flow with the stock and let your wrist float around the edge.*
                              The balls are for interupted and/or curved moves, and "no Balls' are usually for straight sections only.
                              I like the balls mostly except for straight Aluminum pieces.
                              Keep the spares in the handle, and if you have a chance, cut out a piece of paper describing each bit'ds function, and keep that in the handle too.
                              when you don't like the results, read the instructions and soon you too can get professional results..but I can't help you with dancing.
                              Rich

                              * for a 2 inch hole, my wrist probably makes a 5 inch circle with the bit trailing.

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