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  • Titanium

    Would you use HSS or Carbide to turn titanium?

  • #2
    Well I have never cut titanium but, as far as I know carbide and HSS
    ware at about the same rate
    I onetime took a tour of a shop that milled alot of titanium
    and I was told that all of there cutting tools are HSS.
    the reason being that 2" rougher would cut for about 4 hours
    and cost $100.00 to re sharpen and a carbide of the same size
    would cut for about 4 hours and cost two hundred dollars or more
    to re sharpen.

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    • #3
      Titaniumn

      I have Milled Literally tons of titaniumn. Aircraft grade. We used 2 inch endmills. Kept lots of coolant on and to wash chips away 4 big hoses per cutter. It cut OK as long as tools were sharp. No Problem. Also used carbide inserted face mills (round inserts) to flycut top shapes. Hard on inserts you just gotta keep an eye out on em. Drilling them we used a lot of high pressure through tool tooling. Also big trappanning tools to cut big holes outa it. I still have half a milk crate fulla what i call chips. Each CHIP is around 1.5 to 2 inch diameter and 4 inches long. Good for motorcycle wheel spacers and other stuff.

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      • #4
        Wicked sharp HSS works well. Machining titanium generates a lot of heat, so some kind of coolant is probably advisable.
        ----------
        Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
        Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
        Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
        There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
        Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
        Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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        • #5
          "Each CHIP is around 1.5 to 2 inch diameter and 4 inches long."


          Good grief!
          I never would have thought about cutting titanium with HSS. I guess i under-estimated its abilities. I have a paradigm that titanium is super hard; i would've thought you'd need some kind of special material to cut it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Fasttrack
            I have a paradigm that titanium is super hard; i would've thought you'd need some kind of special material to cut it.

            Time for a paradigm shift...

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            • #7
              Lots of titanium cutters over on Practical Machinist. Apparently the stuff also burns, not unlike magnesium. That can get exciting too!

              Best,

              BW
              ---------------------------------------------------

              http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
              Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
              http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html

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              • #8
                I have some experience with Ti from a hobbyist's point of view.
                Go very slow, very very sharp tools and watch for heat.
                I drill with cobalt drills and use HSS and carbide inserts for the boring and turning.

                The fine cobweb like turnings will burn white hot and I have no flood cooling so ....go slow.

                Also it work hardens so do not creep up on the final dimension.

                For some more info on machining Titanium flashlights,
                click

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                • #9
                  Burning Titaniumn

                  Was milling a thirty foot (round that length) forward rudder spar outa titaniumn clamping unclamping as the facemill cut along the length. Suddenly a bunch and there were sure a bunch started burning laughing i grabbed a broom and suddenly it was burning almost got outa control lost a broom beating on it. Gotta watch that stuff. That trappaning tool was a nice tool. Slow and steady but awesome motor spindle load on the load meter. It would remove big cored sections which i always squirreled away. Mike

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Fasttrack
                    I have a paradigm that titanium is super hard; i would've thought you'd need some kind of special material to cut it.
                    Not really. The higher-strength Ti alloys are about the same strength as the higher-strength steel alloys, but Ti has only 2/3 the density of steel, so its strength-to-weight ratio can be considerably better. Stiffness-to-weight ratio of all Ti alloys is just about identical to steel, though.

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                    • #11
                      I turn Ti regularly using HSS inserts from The Arthur Warner Company.

                      They work beautifully.
                      "Lay on ground-light fuse-get away"

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                      • #12
                        I know titanium isn't all that incredible - i realize that its not the wonder metal of all times but somehow, i'm going to blame it on the media and thier "titanium" this and that, i still think of it as being really hard stuff. Then the logical half of my brain says, wait a minute, this has come up before on the home shop machinist forum...i know better

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                        • #13
                          My Ti chicken

                          I found that just keeping this stuff cool and wet helps out alot when turning and milling and gives a smooth finish. I like the corrosive resistence it has, even made a spare surf fishing spool out of some.Havnt eaten any yet, probably tastes like chicken!
                          mi2cents
                          John
                          johnny o

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