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Cut-resistant kevlar gloves in the shop

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  • Cut-resistant kevlar gloves in the shop

    Another bonus from working at the nuclear plant, They gave me some kevlar gloves to handle sheetmetal and using a knife to strip cable. After slipping once or twice I found out they work. The ones with the dots are better at gripping things, (no slips=no cuts) Chips and burrs go right through the weave tho. These are made by CE Memphis (made in the USA) and I think they came from grainger.
    I wish I had some of these when I used to be a bouncer, don't wipe your nose, it hurts.. ha ha. Knife makers should take notice. Hard to polish them blades without getting cut.

  • #2
    Are they expensive?
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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    • #3
      Looks like less than ten dollars at grainger for another brand. Make sure and get the ones with the dots though.http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/pro...mId=1613496808

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      • #4
        The border patrol folks use some Kevlar gloves which are not so good. the gloves hold stuff and a needle can get in to the weave.

        I find these gloves at the gun shows and then. For my knifemaking I use leather gloves, expensive, but saves me a lot of injuries. Plus they are comfortable.

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        • #5
          OK, this is my number one pet safety peeve. First, I'm not saying gloves don't have a place in the shop; for handeling material there great. But wearing them around running machines is a good way to loose a hand or arm instead of finger. If that glove gets snaged it's not going to cut away cleanly, its going to wrap or snag and take the hand that's in it with it.

          Sorry if this throws cold water on the discusion, but this one realy scares me because people think they're protecting themselves when in fact their putting themselves in danger.

          Carry on.

          -Dave

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          • #6
            Believe me, I adgree. But handling sheetmetal or anything with sharp edges the kevlar helps. It is a saftey rule to wear them while stripping out rubber cord at the plant, I believe in them now. But like I said the best way not to get cut is not to slip, the ones with the traction dots are best.

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            • #7
              These are great gloves for welding and picking up hot, sharp, women. Did I say that out loud? Ah, Crap...

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              • #8
                Glad you're feeling better Thrud!

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                • #9
                  The other day we had a guy get cut on an endmill in a BP. The machine was not running at the time. Required 1 stich. Because this was a reportable injury safety had a fit. They actually wanted the people on the shop floor to wear gloves when running machines.
                  Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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                  • #10
                    These kevlar gloves cause people to not respect sharp objects. First time they don't have them on. Cut. I think a lot of saftey devices are taken for granted. THEY all have a place. I would not grind without glasses or weld without a helmet. Moving machinery and gloves are not a real good ideal tho, Kinda like ties around lathes. BUT for sharp sheet metal they are great. I have kept the pairs too nasty to wear at work anymore. I am going to launder them and use them here. The main culprit is my english wheel. Rocking the metal back and forth in the rollers cuts my palms. Lil bitty cuts you can hardly see till you wash them. Yeah, I file the edges before I handle it, but still get nicked. I got cut on a endmill once. I had these spiral cuts in my hand, I was amazed and confused how I could have done that. I got a kwik-switch in my bridgeport tho.

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                    • #11
                      Hamdling stuff. the kevlar gloves would be great. Running them through a cutter with your fingers within them, well, I have my doubts. Maybe they will hold the meat remnants well??????

                      Use gloves handling material. Throw the gloves as hard and far away fom you as you can when running machinery or any rotating items.
                      CCBW, MAH

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                      • #12
                        spope14:
                        I would normally agree with you but not in the sheet metal trade. It is safer to wear the gloves than to slice your hands up because management does not mant to sharpen shear blades or punches. As tough as I am, I can't work when my hands are sliced to pieces when working on a brake. I will admit that there have been times when gloves have given their lives so that I would not get pinched by dies. In that regard a tight glove would be a hinderance as I would not be able to pull my hands out if the gloves get caught in the dies and they would not be used.

                        Generally speaking the press brake and punch press have the potential for the biggest accidents. Fortunately on the punch presses adequate safety is observed using tongs or safety buttons and sheilds. On a press brake, especially a full manual one, the operator must exercise extreme caution. On one hand parts need to be formed properly, on the other operator safety cannot be comprimised as much as it often is. I refuse to operate mechanical press brakes as once you press the pedal, there is no going back - with a hydraulic brake you can lift your foot and halt the ram or retract it - far safer.

                        You have to use your brain and common sense here. I would not be caught dead with gloves on when a lathe or mill is running - rubber or cloth. As I say the Kevlar are excellent welding gloves as they are heat resistant.

                        If you are really worried about cuts, you can buy Stainless steel mesh gloves - they were developed for the bottling industry.

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                        • #13
                          gloves are still a no no they will grab you and rip your arm off. iv picked up other machinist after mistakes and gloves are not for real machinist, mayby push button machinist but not manual machinist. i have run 35 hp machines and 5 hp drill presses and never wear gloves, if you are shearing stainless ok but, but machinist should never wear gloves.iv seen bad things,BAD.

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                          • #14
                            Should have speced the rtotating machinery to be lathes, mills, drills ect. Have used gloves on benders and on punches where the guards are around any rotating wheels that power the main press or punch. Have and do use them with sheet metal.

                            I do get away from them when i have the vise grip holders for sheet metal and such though.
                            CCBW, MAH

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