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  • Good CNC mill for jewelry making?

    Hi,
    I'm new to this BBS and new to CNC and just started a subscription to The Home Shop Machinist. I'm interested in a CNC mill for creative jewelry making. I do NOT want to carve waxes for casting. I'm more interested in things like inlay (carving a complex recess into silver then carving a matching piece of gold to fit in the silver recess), Carving a bas relief design around a band ring, carving elaborate overlays or trim for pendants, boxes, goblets, etc. Just for reference, you can see a photo of a piece I did a long time ago for the Stein Eye Institute at UCLA:

    http://www.carmelcoast.com/pages/Car...AG/Casady.html

    It is a simple design, but a lot of work. I'd like to do more complex designs and think a CNC mill would make that possible.

    I was looking on the web at the MAXNC 15 CL2. It looks very interesting, but I'd like to hear from anyone who has had first hand experience with a MAXNC (and isn't selling them :-) ).

    I'm also interested in hearing about other possibilities. I want something more robust than a Sherline. It would get some use making telescope gadgets. I have a Unimat and it is too light duty for that kind of thing.

    Comments would be most appreciated,
    Robin Casady
    http://www.CarmelCoast.com

    Casady & Greene, Inc.
    http://www.casadyg.com

  • #2
    Check out http://www.desktopcnc.com - the site has 75 desktop CNC mills in a comparison table along with contact information for the companies. It has some other useful information also. The site is informational - it does not sell any machines.

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Robin Casady:
    Hi,
    I'm new to this BBS and new to CNC and just started a subscription to The Home Shop Machinist. I'm interested in a CNC mill for creative jewelry making. I do NOT want to carve waxes for casting. I'm more interested in things like inlay (carving a complex recess into silver then carving a matching piece of gold to fit in the silver recess), Carving a bas relief design around a band ring, carving elaborate overlays or trim for pendants, boxes, goblets, etc. Just for reference, you can see a photo of a piece I did a long time ago for the Stein Eye Institute at UCLA:

    http://www.carmelcoast.com/pages/Car...AG/Casady.html

    It is a simple design, but a lot of work. I'd like to do more complex designs and think a CNC mill would make that possible.

    I was looking on the web at the MAXNC 15 CL2. It looks very interesting, but I'd like to hear from anyone who has had first hand experience with a MAXNC (and isn't selling them :-) ).

    I'm also interested in hearing about other possibilities. I want something more robust than a Sherline. It would get some use making telescope gadgets. I have a Unimat and it is too light duty for that kind of thing.

    Comments would be most appreciated,
    </font>

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks very much!

      ------------------
      Robin Casady
      http://www.CarmelCoast.com

      Casady & Greene, Inc.
      http://www.casadyg.com
      Robin Casady
      http://www.CarmelCoast.com

      Casady & Greene, Inc.
      http://www.casadyg.com

      Comment


      • #4
        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Robin Casady:
        Hi,
        I'm new to this BBS and new to CNC and just started a subscription to The Home Shop Machinist. I'm interested in a CNC mill for creative jewelry making. I do NOT want to carve waxes for casting. I'm more interested in things like inlay (carving a complex recess into silver then carving a matching piece of gold to fit in the silver recess), Carving a bas relief design around a band ring, carving elaborate overlays or trim for pendants, boxes, goblets, etc. Just for reference, you can see a photo of a piece I did a long time ago for the Stein Eye Institute at UCLA:

        http://www.carmelcoast.com/pages/Car...AG/Casady.html

        It is a simple design, but a lot of work. I'd like to do more complex designs and think a CNC mill would make that possible.

        I was looking on the web at the MAXNC 15 CL2. It looks very interesting, but I'd like to hear from anyone who has had first hand experience with a MAXNC (and isn't selling them :-) ).

        I'm also interested in hearing about other possibilities. I want something more robust than a Sherline. It would get some use making telescope gadgets. I have a Unimat and it is too light duty for that kind of thing.

        Comments would be most appreciated,
        </font>
        Hi - have you come across this website in your travels?

        http://www.5xj.com/

        He seems to be doing the kind of stuff you are talking about. There are details of his Taig CNC mill setup on this site also.

        I use the Taig CNC mill myself - it is (in my opinion) significantly more robust than its close competitors (Sherline and MaxNC).

        Comment


        • #5
          Any updates here?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tony Jeffree View Post
            Hi - have you come across this website in your travels?

            http://www.5xj.com/

            He seems to be doing the kind of stuff you are talking about. There are details of his Taig CNC mill setup on this site also.

            I use the Taig CNC mill myself - it is (in my opinion) significantly more robust than its close competitors (Sherline and MaxNC).
            I have a Taig, and I owned a MaxNC5 in the past (gave it to a friend). I found the MaxNC to be lighter, but because its a more consistent design through out some things it seemed to do better. Its also a rigid (aluminum sadly) column mill. One of the designs I am proudest of I completed on the MaxNC. I had the smallest one, and it was a quite old design. I modified mine a bit. Since the old owners took back MaxNC and renamed it XiMotion they have made some of the same improvements I made to mine. Just for general hobby machining I'd probably lean slightly towards the Taig, but the XiMotion machines might be an option.

            That being said it might be a mute point. I can't find either the MaxNC or the XiMotion websites right now. There are a few used MaxNC machines on ebay.
            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

            Comment


            • #7
              Zombie thread...
              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                Zombie thread...
                Yep...

                But, if I was to answer the OP I'd say don't screw around with bench top mills. You can do tiny work with great accuracy (+/- .0005") on a large CNC mill ( a quality one of course). It's unlikely you can do that high accuracy work on a bench top mill though.

                If he's routinely working with gold and silver it's likely he may have deep pockets so don't skimp on equipment.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DR View Post
                  Yep...

                  But, if I was to answer the OP I'd say don't screw around with bench top mills. You can do tiny work with great accuracy (+/- .0005") on a large CNC mill ( a quality one of course). It's unlikely you can do that high accuracy work on a bench top mill though.

                  If he's routinely working with gold and silver it's likely he may have deep pockets so don't skimp on equipment.
                  Haas mini mill then

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                    Zombie thread...
                    I think that's the point....this was the first thread, at least unless some were deleted.

                    We now have low cost 3d wax printing (I do remember 3D printing in the 90's but it was not cheap). That's got to be the game changing answer on not wanting to carve wax....print it!
                    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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