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  • Alternate to a Drill Doc?

    Just kinda thinking here...what if you were to take an air pencil die grinder with a wheel stone. Then, mount it in a tool holder, set the compound to the lathe at the proper angle, and set the grinder just below center. Hold the bit in the chuck, and you could feed the grinder down the cutting egde with the compound, turn the chuck to the other side and do it again. Once the edge is done, you could hand grind the remaining relief needed. Is this crazy?

  • #2
    Not crazy, but do you really want all that abrasive over your machine?
    Just got my head together
    now my body's falling apart

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    • #3
      Alternate to a Drill Doc?

      S and S,

      Is that any worse than using the Dumore to grind in a center? We used to cover the ways with rags when grinding on the lathe.

      As for the drill doctor, I like mine and it performs well. I guess they are not manufactured consistently as folks seem to have a lot of trouble getting them to work. I think the key is a gentle touch in mounting the drill in the collet and especially when using the fixture to align the flutes. After all, they are mostly plastic.
      Jim (KB4IVH)

      Only fools abuse their tools.

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      • #4
        To each his own, Scishop.
        Fair call, but I choose to keep abrasive away from my lathe.
        Just pointing out the possible dangers to a machine.
        Just got my head together
        now my body's falling apart

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        • #5
          You might be able to sharpen them this way but I'll do 20 with the drill doctor for every one you can get done on the lathe.

          I think the Drill Doctors shortcoming is that the index mark used to align the chuck in the alignment side does not look like an alignment mark. It looks more like a rib to re-enforce the chuck for strength. Had they put white paint on it like the white dots then it would have been far more obvious. The drawings in the instruction booklet are not clear enough, at least for me they aren't.
          - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
          Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

          It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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          • #6
            Some good info here (which I think was first linked from this board, but quicker to find my bookmark)
            http://www.gadgetbuilder.com/DrillSh...l#Four%20Facet
            Just got my head together
            now my body's falling apart

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            • #7
              Best alternative is just to buy a proper drill grinder used. Like an Oliver 21...pick 'em up at auctions sometimes for just a few hundred bucks. Make sure you get both V block mounts with it for full range. Other good benchtop ones include Black Diamond and Optima. Optima made in Switzerland and currently sells for $24,000 new (not a misprint), but sometimes on eBay as cheap as $1,000 with all the tooling !

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              • #8
                Not to hijack the thread- but has anybody use one of these? http://cgi.ebay.com/Drill-Bit-Sharpe...QQcmdZViewItem

                It's like a 10 dollar mount for mounting drills for sharpening on a bench grinder.
                You never learn anything by doing it right.

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                • #9
                  Scatterplot,
                  they work but only approximate the correct geometry,
                  Nick

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                  • #10
                    Per RWS's post: How about using a 1" diam. diamond disc in the pencil grinder instead of the usual stone. Voila, no stone dust just metal.

                    There was an article in MEW a few issues back re doing this to sharpen endmillls. These discs are quite cheap - I bought a 6-pack for $12 recently with a plan to try it out. The author used a Dremel with the disc mounted in the flex shaft head. It's on my to-do list!!!

                    Geoff

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                    • #11
                      Has anyone built a Tinker?

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                      • #12
                        I've not used the drill doctor, but have drooled over the expensive ones DT mentions, and that do a perfect job. sorry, I'm not spending that much money....there may not be a way to get the traditional shape of a drill point without spending mucho $$$$ dollars but if you look at the 4 or even 6 facet point, which many believe is superior, there are more options.

                        I set out to design my own, and here's what I figured a drill sharpener has to do.

                        - needs a grinding wheel on a reasonably good spindle.
                        - motion to bring the work into the wheel
                        - need to set point angle and relief angle, a compound angle.
                        - needs to be adjustable for both a primary and secondary relief, possible even an addition facet, taking of the corners.
                        - need to be able to index 180 while maintaining longitudinal position
                        - needs to fit a wide range of drill sizes
                        - needs some sort of delicate radial adjust, ie tooth rest to the frustration out of initial set up.

                        I've got grinders, so it was logical to make use of one of their spindles. if you were starting from scratch, it would make more sense imo to pick up a used surface grinder or t&c grinder and make something like i did before i'd spend thousands on a drill sharpener. the exception would be if it was for business, the drill sharpener would be faster. mine will however perfectly sharpen a drill bit that'll cut a hole to within a thou or two.

                        I've posted this here before....what i came up with is http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...cgyver+grinder

                        the universal vice it sites on is something i built and is also detailed in a thread herein. or buy one on ebay.

                        if you wanted to lower the cost further, a bench grinder with a cup wheel and some linear bearings might work, but imo by the time you bought all that stuff you'd still have an inferior spindle, buying a grinder also gives a very useful tool beyond drill sharpening.

                        I know many (most) won't want to go this far, but if you want first class points on the drills I thought long and hard about and figured this was the lowest cost route to get there.
                        .

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mcgyver
                          I've not used the drill doctor, but have drooled over the expensive ones DT mentions, and that do a perfect job. sorry, I'm not spending that much money I've got grinders, so it was logical to make use of one of their spindles. if you were starting from scratch, it would make more sense imo to pick up a used surface grinder or t&c grinder and make something like i did before i'd spend thousands on a drill sharpener.
                          Hundreds, not thousands. I've actually seen perfectly nice Oliver 21's sell as cheap as $75 at live auctions, but said "a few hundred" just to be conservative as $200 or so is more typical. $200 for a precision machine that cost many thousands new, built to be accurate for a lifetime, vs $160 or so for one of those POS drill doctors...a no brainer.

                          Nice Black Diamond drill grinders often sell in the $500 range with full set of collets...real nice late ones, maybe $900. Same deal as the Oliver...a tool for a lifetime, meant to do the job to industry standards.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by zopi
                            Has anyone built a Tinker?

                            I have -- the Tinker doesn't sharpen drills unless you build a drill sharpening attachment for it. The Tinker's movements and angles aren't really suitable for drill sharpening.

                            I wound up building several gadgets devoted to drill sharpening to handle most of my drill sharpening needs, but still haven't addressed drills larger than 1/2" adequately. In my little home shop I couldn't justify an expensive grinder devoted to drill sharpening so I built hand powered sharpeners for small and medium drills and use an el-cheapo sharpener on the bench grinder for larger drills, then add a facet on a hand sharpener. As usual, if I count my time at more the $1/hr I probably should have bought a grinder... but I learned a lot building the sharpeners

                            It took me quite a while to digest the info in this short article:
                            http://www.mmsonline.com/articles/068901.html

                            I use Secondary Point Angles SPA's on many drills over #10 now and like them a lot. I haven't seen drills for sale with SPA's.
                            Location: Newtown, CT USA

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                            • #15
                              No I aint even going here. On 2nd thought I will . For 3/4 down t0 1/16 a Darex m5 is the way to go if you can`t afford a Black Diamond In a hurt a Lisle 91000 will do for drills 1/8 - 1 1/8 for small stuff # 80 to 1/5 a SRDworks good but is high dollar .But then again any thing is better than nothing.And with all of the above I still grind 99% of mine by hand. LEARN HOW. That is the cheepest way out. It will never be perfect but a hole is a hole most of the time . If it needs to be any thing more Ream or bore it . No such thing as a precision drilled hole. NO machine that true no drill will drill a perfect hole not even a Jig Borer for precision you ream or bore for location and size .
                              Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
                              http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
                              http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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