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  • Good quality safety glasses

    Yesterday I had Lasik surgery so hopefully no more glasses.

    In the past, I wouldn't wear safety goggles while milling just my prescription glasses... Shame on me I know. I'd wear them while grinding or something that seemed shaky on the lathe.

    Time to change my habits, when I enter the shop the safety glasses will go on. So I need a good set. Part of my problem before was uncomfortable goggles or condensation with a face shield. (I'll still wear a face shield when grinding with my new safety glasses, exploding grinders scare me)

    So, anyone have a recommendation for some good safety glasses? Willing to spend some money on a comfortable pair that I'd wear.

    Edit:

    I have a bigger sized head, some of the glasses I've tried in the past didn't fit well cause they were too small

  • #2
    There are other good quality brands to be sure, but my experience in having sold hundreds of pairs of various models of the Uvex brand is that they are top shelf glasses.

    Many styles

    http://www.uvex.com/home.asp


    Ken

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    • #3
      Bumping this thread up because I am curious what people wear for safety glasses (nonprescription) and what are the good ones to get?

      I have something similar to these now, they are cheap.

      Andy

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      • #4
        Th lens are all built to the same OSHA standard so it really boils down to whats comfortable and what fits your face best.

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        • #5
          Wear the right kind for the right job. Those kind above won't protect against chemical splashes. I have two sets handy... one for general work and a set of goggles for chemicals.

          Also... get a full face mask. Generally you can't go wrong with an extra layer when doing something questionable.
          This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
          Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
          Plastic Operators Dot Com

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          • #6
            Great question, as I went through this process some time back, without much success. I have quite a few now, but my preferred are some from Enco, though I can't say I'd necessarily recommend them. While it's true they may all meet the same "standard" I believe this relates only to impact protection and not optical quality. I've noticed the optical quality seems rather poor with many of them.

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            • #7
              Uvex are good as are AO (American Optical). Just do not scrimp on safety glasses/eye protection as eye surgery to repair damage is not a sure thing. 2X on finding a comfortable pair as that will help one to wear them.

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              • #8
                Norton 180's also good in the dark ones for AO welding. Total eye cover front and side and well vented. Always been my choice for many years. Peter
                The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

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                • #9
                  Another vote for UVEX. They even have 3 and 5 shade lenses available for grinding and O/A welding as well as the typical clear lenses.

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                  • #10
                    The standards the lense meets is important, but also important is wearing a pair of goggle type, and/or a full face shield . Wearing safety glasses that are styled just like conventional glasses ignores the frequent problems of projectiles traveling up under the glasses, or chemical splashes. Even just working under a vehicle requires better than standard type glasses .
                    Problems of condensation and staying in place on your head are frequent, but I prefer large area coverage over my eyes and face that a full face shield provides, or at least good fitting goggles. I've also noticed tiny writing on some safety goggles and glasses that states that they do not meet the current ANSI standards, and should be used accordingly.
                    Last edited by Bill736; 01-02-2011, 12:06 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Ive reached the bi-focal age and found the glasses from radienz(sp?) in dark and clear in 1.5x to be the solution for me. i work mostly outdoors and wear the dark ones constantantly,when Im in the shady shop the clear ones are on.no need to switch glasses when setting up and running a machine.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bill736
                        The standards the lense meets is important, but also important is wearing a pair of goggle type, and/or a full face shield . Wearing safety glasses that are styled just like conventional glasses ignores the frequent problems of projectiles traveling up under the glasses, or chemical splashes.
                        Probably of little interest to those who work purely in metal, but I know many here dabble in other areas. I use a powered respirator when working in dusty environments such as routing a lot of MDF.

                        http://www.tritontools.com/library/m.../PRA001_IM.pdf

                        The battery pack and fan ride on a belt and I position it behind me where it's out of the way. All well and good of course ... until I forget about it and fart!!!

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                        • #13
                          Safety glasses are a part of my life. Id rather loose an arm than my vision. And going to the extremes Id rather loose ANY of my ability's before my sight.

                          Take my sense of taste, smell, arms and legs. I cherish my vision the most. Right up there with my mind. Id rather loose my mind before my vision any day of the week. My eyes are the MAIN porthole to my brain. Let me loose my brain first please. JR
                          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                          • #14
                            uvex or Bolle for me....not worth the risk of cheap

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                            • #15
                              Uvex or any brand that meets safety standards, fits well, has side shields, etc. Realize that they will get scratched, damaged, stepped on, fall from the bench, lens clouded from fumes, etc. Buy more than one pair, consider getting cases for all of them.

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