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MACHINING TITANIUM

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  • MACHINING TITANIUM

    As it is much easier to lighten my motorcycle than it is to lose weight I have decide to make titanium axles,nuts, swingarm shaft and various other odds and ends, all basically simple turning jobs. What can I expect when turning titanium, I have never worked with it before. I have not looked in machinery's handbook yet because I have the world's greatest R&D department right here (you guys)which also falls into line with the old fat guy thing, I would have to walk upstairs to get the book.
    Non, je ne regrette rien.

  • #2
    Use a slow feed and speed. Use lots of lube. When drilling, reaming, and tapping, it will grab the tools. I've seen a lot of drills and reamers snapped off in the piece because there was not enough lube and they were horsing it thru. Take your time and you'll be fine.

    Kevin
    If it's not good enough for you, it's sure not good enough for anyone else.

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    • #3
      Razor sharp tools with a slow speed and a heavy feed lots-o-lube also I have found that reamers work best if they are the lefthand spiral righthand cut variety.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        Chip control is very important, the stuff will burn. Use sand not water to extinquish the flames.

        ------------------
        Neil Peters
        Neil Peters

        When on the hunt, a broken part is better than no part at all.

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        • #5
          In my experience, drown the cut in coolant or cutting oil and it will machine fairly easily.

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          • #6
            Chief,

            I've been machining this stuff for some years now and can only wholeheartedly agree with what has been said here. Just don't *****foot with the stuff - you have to get under the 'skin' and keep the tool cutting, once it rubs you have to break down and resharpen the tool.

            I use a lot of T614 (90%Ti, 6%Al, 4%Vanadium), this is a good alround alloy. Other good stuff to use is T330, T315, and if you can get it T506.

            Two words of warning though!! Do not use CP titanium; and more importantly, you must 'life' any safety critical components like wheel axles (these are specifically banned in current race bikes by the FIM due to the danger of failure). I life my axles to 20 race meetings (average of about 800 miles)~ my bike gets around the FIM ban by being a classic racer - raced 'as was made'. The Ti triple crown assembly and fork stanchions are copies of the originals - but I regularly have them x-rayed for signs of impending failure, and change them evry 5 years or so. Bolts and fittings in Ti also have to be checked regularly.

            The engine internals in my bike are well represented in the stuff as well ~ con rod, big end cage, cam gears, pushrod ends, rockers and valves, and valve spring retainers all being in Ti. Again, these bits have to be lifed for failure reasons.

            Ti is not a 'fit and forget' piece of technology. It is extremely notch sensitive, and suffers from hydrogen embrittlement.

            Be warned - Be safe

            RR

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            • #7
              Ragaresd,
              Thanks for the info, the bike is a vintage mx'er so fast is just a relative term, I'm trying to replicate what the factory did for their works bikes. I have access to NDT equipment so checking the life isn't a problem but I am unfamiliar with the term notching please elaborate. Thanks, chief
              Non, je ne regrette rien.

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              • #8
                Ragarsed hit on a good point you also might use larger radi for things like shaft fillets.
                I just need one more tool,just one!

                Comment


                • #9
                  <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by NAMPeters:
                  Chip control is very important, the stuff will burn. Use sand not water to extinquish the flames.

                  </font>
                  Being a rookie, this statement got me wondering!! Now, this might be a stupid question, but, why use sand instead of water???

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                  • #10
                    My guess is that sand will displace air from getting at the burning metal, and will absorb the heat without becoming part of the reaction. Water, at sufficiently high temperature will contribute to the burning, as it will become separated into h and o. Titanium probably burns at a very high temp. Feedback req'd here, I'm just taking a guess.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      OutlawSmithy:
                      If you ever are stupid enough to accidently set magnesium on fire water will cause an explosion. Purple K is safe for most metal fires.

                      Check MSDS sheets first!

                      http://www.titanium.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I know about magnesium, Thrud, it'll also burn underwater.....if it doesn't explode first

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                        • #13
                          Ya also makes an excellent underwater cutting rod just in case you want to go on a deepsea salvage mission ahla Dirk Pitt
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

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                          • #14
                            farm it out and make 10% mark up.
                            ill punt and have it done right and do nothing in a heartbeat.
                            no srcap, no problem good parts on time and done right.
                            try it.
                            i wish you luck.
                            mike.

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                            • #15
                              Titanium is not a fire hazard in my experience. Use high speed tools, slow feed and speed and a heavy cut. Titanium work hardens quickly so if you let the tool rub it will fail quickly. As stated elsewhere above keep the cutting edge in the cut. Use the black thread cutting oil if you have it.

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