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Home Shop vs Machinists Workshop

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  • Home Shop vs Machinists Workshop

    This year i was pretty excited to find a copy of Machinists Workshop in my stocking as well a year subscription. My mom had a hard time knowing which one to get, either Home Shop Machinist or the Machinist's Workshop.


    I'm pretty excited about the subscription, but we were both wondering what the differences were...?


    Thanks guys



    p.s. Jsn_Joiners post reminded me since i actually read the article he was referring to!

  • #2
    I find the machinist's workshop a little better for me it has a few more projects that im interested in.I do find projects in the other as well but not as many.

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    • #3
      Hey thanks for the quick reply!

      Comment


      • #4
        Fasttrack,
        This question has been asked many times before, a search will get you tons of opinions.

        Personally, I would subscribe to either both, or neither. I see them as almost the same magazine, and they work together nicely since they're published in alternating months. Certainly not cheap to subscribe to both, though.

        I asked for and received a subscription to Live Steam this Christmas. I'm looking forward to seeing whether I like it.

        Scott

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        • #5
          Machinist's Workshop morphed from Projects in Metal, which was originally a magazine with no advertising and simpler projects, none of which were serialized.

          Machinist's Workshop has become more like Home Shop Machinist in recent years with the addition of advertising and the occasional serialized article. Most of the articles are directed toward shop and tooling type projects.

          HSM usually has somewhat more involved articles, and some less shop oriented projects such as the current Snow engine.

          I would not be too surprised to see the magazimes merged into a monthly before too long. Hopefully at a reduction in subscription price.
          Jim H.

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          • #6
            Hard to say. I think it depends in part on where you are in "the hobby." After subscribing to a half-dozen or more assorted magazines over the past 20+ years, and buying numerous back issues, I now have about 30 feet of shelves deveoted to magazines and more reading and projects than I'd ever be able to do in 5 lifetimes, so now I don't subscribe to anything.
            Back when I was first starting out though, I subscribed to a bunch. Each magazine (for me at that time) would contribute a little something different to my shop education. But, as Scott says, subscribing to multiple magazines can get expensive.
            ----------
            Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
            Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
            Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
            There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
            Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
            Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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            • #7
              I currently subscribe to both but was wondering if anyone knew of other machinist mags that may be out there that I could get as well. I can't have to many articles to read!!!

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              • #8
                In addition to the two mentioned above, I also get Model Engineers' Workshop (through Wise Owl Publications in Ca). It is a British publication and is tuned more towards those folks who make models. However, not all the articles are geared to smaller lathes (7" swing. aka Myford) and mills.

                Over the last few years there have been some excellent articles on electronics, and a recent series on using only a lathe to build tooling. I would say that about half of the projects published are in metric but I don't find that to be a problem.

                Geoff

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                • #9
                  I find it hard to believe that there are not more trade publications out there for guys who are machinists and tool and die makers. I get tired of the seeing all these steam engine mags but nothing for the guy who wants tech articles and such on common machine shop problems. Maybe I shopuld start my own magazine speciffically geared towards the guys who work day in and day out in a shop with articles relating to the work they do!


                  BTW...not that there is anything wrong with steam engines.

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                  • #10
                    There's a relatively new mag called Model Engine Builder that's quite good in its subject material (model engines, of course). Besides projects, there's lots of articles that describe techniques/methods of performing some sort of operation. Turning crankshafts, seating valves, etc. have been covered in the past. It's published every other month and is kind of expensive, but I really like it so far.

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                    • #11
                      A question to the group....

                      What magazines today are available for the HSMer?

                      TMT

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                      • #12
                        For that matter what is available for the tradesmen that have made machining their life?! Other than American Machinist, which is written more for management then the actual guys doing the work, I am not aware of any. It is truly a shame that we don't have our own publication.

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                        • #13
                          I'm a novice machinist--self taught and still bumbling about the shop. I subscribe to both magazines and find them both valuable to me.

                          When I first subcribed, I was baffled by almost everything. Now, I can actually tell the difference between a mill/drill and a lathe (about 75% of the time). In other words, the magazines have taught me a lot, and many of the things that once confused me are now perfectly clear. But I'm still not sure what a "quorn" is.

                          I went so far as to lurk on eBay and buy all the back issues of both magazines. I re-read them and use them for reference. I'm surprised at how often I find something interesting in an old issue that I completely ignored a while back.

                          Some of the articles are poorly written, but they're written by machinists and not by English majors. The information is worthwhile, and that's what's important.

                          Last night, I was going through some old issues and found one of the best explanations of thread cutting that I've ever seen. It was well written and it made a lot of things clearer to me.

                          Best wishes.
                          James (seatlanta)

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jdunmyer
                            There's a relatively new mag called Model Engine Builder that's quite good in its subject material (model engines, of course). Besides projects, there's lots of articles that describe techniques/methods of performing some sort of operation. Turning crankshafts, seating valves, etc. have been covered in the past. It's published every other month and is kind of expensive, but I really like it so far.
                            Model Engine Builder is the successor to Strictly IC, which is out of publication, but back issues are available from the publishers website or ebay. This was (is) an amazing source of information & projects pertaining to model IC engines. It got slicker & more professional as the years went by, but some of the best info was in the early issues. Sorry this sounds like an ad, but I am not associated w/ Strictly IC in any way....

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                            • #15
                              James/seatlanta,
                              Like you, I've read a bunch of these magazines over the years, I subscribed long before I had a milling machine. Always lusted after those projects that required a mill, as I was On the Outside, Looking In. There has been so much information published that some of it is bound to have rubbed off over the years, and it's always good to return to earlier issues to see if you understand the stuff better, with the benefit of more experience.

                              A while back, Machinists Workshop published an article on shaft repair that paid for several years' subscriptions for me.

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