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Evan: What is the name of the super slippery stuf you told us about a while back.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Evan- slippery stuff

    On the other channel, they/we have been prattling about linseed oil.

    Dare I tell them that to stop a boil over- silicone fluid was put in the kettle?

    Norm

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  • old-biker-uk
    replied
    Vaseline

    Hey YOD - Did you mean 'put it on the bedroom door handle to keep the kids out' ?
    Mark

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  • fixxit
    replied
    It is available in a thickened form as Dow Corning "high vacuum silicon grease."
    This ultra pure thick form tends to stay where you put it.

    Great stuff. It is almost totally inert.
    It is useful from -40F to +400F.

    There is a variant form available as Dow Corning compound 111 valve lubricant and sealant.

    Evan is correct about not being able to paint a surface that it gets on.
    I have never found any sovent that will totally remove the stuff.

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  • darryl
    replied
    Hmmm. Now if those puppies were filled with silly putty, you could mold them to any shape you wanted. Maybe you could do away with that 'containment' sling. Still dangerous though- someone could lose an eye.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan

    If it ever gets on a surface you will never be able to paint it successfully.

    sounds like armor-all might have some of that stuff in it, I know if you get that stuff on paint its tuff to paint over it...


    ohh yeah, i prefer all natural ;>}

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  • Evan
    replied
    It is perfectly safe for painted surfaces. In fact, it basically inert. Just don't try to paint over it.

    It does have one important use I didn't mention:

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  • darryl
    replied
    Well isn't that ironic. I've just been playing with some polymethylsiloxane the past couple days. Silicone brake fluid. Obviously it's high temperature capability is taken advantage of for braking systems. I don't know what more there is to it as brake fluid, but the container doesn't list any other ingredients. It does say safe for painted surfaces, but I gotta wonder.

    Not to hijack the thread, but my application was as a thinner for GI-1000 molding rubber. I'm not sure if it interferes with curing, but silicone oil is called for as a thinner, so I tried it. A lot of it. 50/50, actually. It still hasn't cured, but the molding rubber is old and may not cure well anymore anyway. And probably I mixed in way too much, should have probably kept it to 10% or less. More experimentation is needed. So far I have not gotten a buzz, nauseous, hungry, gasseous, or weak from playing with it. I don't intend to cook breakfast in it.

    As far as low friction materials in solid form, there's frelon and rulon, aside from the normally known ones like PE and teflon.

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  • Mcostello
    replied
    The white paste you see on electrical parts might be heat sink paste.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Evan
    It isn't used normally to lubricate consumer products. It's expensive compared to acceptable alternatives such as lithium grease. Also, the migration problem can be an issue. When I worked with it daily I often wore gloves to keep it off my hands. Not because of any toxicity issues but because it made it difficult to even pick up tools or handle the steering wheel.

    If it ever gets on a surface you will never be able to paint it successfully.
    SO if you were to run that stuff through a high powered atomizer in the middle of a professional paint shop...
    Man, science can be a dangerous thing in the wrong hands...

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  • Evan
    replied
    It isn't used normally to lubricate consumer products. It's expensive compared to acceptable alternatives such as lithium grease. Also, the migration problem can be an issue. When I worked with it daily I often wore gloves to keep it off my hands. Not because of any toxicity issues but because it made it difficult to even pick up tools or handle the steering wheel.

    If it ever gets on a surface you will never be able to paint it successfully.

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  • Your Old Dog
    replied
    Isn't Vasoline cheaper and safer as a topical aide? Certainly slippery enough to get the job done.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    So if its clear it could be the stuff your talking about? I know much of the stuff was clear and lots may have been mostly transparent with a slight white hue, i know it wasnt white lithium though cus thats all white right?

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  • Evan
    replied
    Nope. Silicone oil is crystal clear. What you are seeing is most probably white lithium grease.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Hey Evan, is it that clearish whitish looking grease that you see on the internals of many electronic/mechanical plastic devises? if so you just solved a mystery for me

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  • Evan
    replied
    I don't know exactly. I still have several quarts of the stuff in a couple of different grades left over from when I worked for Xerox. The wipers used on the heat rolls of various xerographic machines such as copiers etc are saturated with it. The larger machines use it by the liter or more and you could probably "borrow" some from just about any copier technician.

    Oh yeah, most don't know the actual name of it. It's usually called fuser oil.

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