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Evan: What is the name of the super slippery stuf you told us about a while back.

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  • #46
    Things we get exposed to that may kill us (or not)

    In WW2 Monsanto used a chemical in the war effort which was then sent to Virginia.No one used gloves then.Regular exposure increased incidence of bladder cancer up to 50% of those exposed and very limited exposure also upped the chances.I've acquired what I believe is FMS in my old days.Being a male and old I have to believe the death of my only son somehow triggered this. A book by a Harvard rehab Doc (John Sarno M.D.) is a very good read.

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    • #47
      I don't think polydimethylsiloxane poses any significant hazard in casual use such a Rain-X or occasional use in other products. If it did there would be unequivocal evidence of the hazard. My exposure was typical only of service reps working on particular models of machines. In many cases service reps would not have been exposed much or at all depending on the product lines they worked on. This combined with the rarity of FMS in males makes it impossible to draw statistically valid conclusions without an enormous sample size.

      It will be interesting to see what my doctor has to say about it when I see her tomorrow morning.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #48
        I would think that any relation between PDMS and FMS or anything else could be rather easily determined by studying those directly involved in the manufacture, blending and packaging of the various products. Their exposure would be much higher than that of the end user.
        Jim H.

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        • #49
          I am sure the manuacturing process is totally automated. The packaging for the products I used was extremely well sealed because of the high potential for migration and slipping problems if it leaked. I doubt if the people involved in the manufacture have any exposure as it is 99.99999% non-volatile ( I didn't make up the nines...). This was a very important consideration because even traces on optics destroy the function. That was a "bug" that was frequently used in training classes to show the importance of preventing migration via cleaning cloths. All cleaning cloths were bagged and disposed after one use.

          It would be interesting to know if there are other occupations where routine exposure occurs, especially ones that employ a significant number of women. Until fairly recently the Xerox service rep force was around 95% male. That was in spite of considerable effort on the part of the company to recruit females.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Evan
            I am sure the manuacturing process is totally automated. The packaging for the products I used was extremely well sealed because of the high potential for migration and slipping problems if it leaked. I doubt if the people involved in the manufacture have any exposure as it is 99.99999% non-volatile.
            It is pretty obvious you have not spent too much time in a manufacturing environment. Things spill, slop, splash, stop, break, burst, leak, jam and drip ad nauseum. Then the maintenance crew, and/or the line operating personell have to wade in (often quite literally) and put it right, BTDT. The exposure is real and full time.

            Other potentially high exposure risks would be those involved in the secondary market. That is those involved in using the bulk material to manufacture formulations other than full strength. The Rain-X production people for instance.

            It may or may not be contributary to FMS, but there are certainly a lot more people available to provide a sample than only end users such as Xerox techs.

            I have a can of it here that I got from a lab tech where I previously worked, they got it for trial in a product, and gave it to me when it was no longer needed. It is a plain old, screw cap "tin" can.
            Jim H.

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            • #51
              Regarding the use of polydimethylsiloxane (sp?) on machine tools....I did find one good use for it deep in the internals of my milling machine head.

              As I was putting my BP mill vari-speed drive motor sheaves back on the spindle, I thought that a tiny dose of that on the spindle might be just the ticket. It's slicker than snot and will do the job with just a tiny film. For those who are familiar with this assembly, one sheave moves up and down on the motor spindle to change diameter of the pulley pair. This sheave half has a plastic bushing in it that is epoxied in place (along with a plastic key) to minimize wear on the spindle. That cuts down on the number of things that might be a valid lubricant due to risk of damage of the plastic. You can use them dry, but reducing friction should increase their life.

              I still don't have the mill finished, so cannot comment on functionality, but likely I will not know if it was a worthwhile move for many years.

              Paul
              Paul Carpenter
              Mapleton, IL

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