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OT: Any bricklayers/Masons on here?

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  • OT: Any bricklayers/Masons on here?

    So, my chimney re-flashing project actually went really well last week. Thanks to all who offered advice on joining all the galvanized steel. It seemed from the responses that there are quite a few board members with roof/chimney experience, so I figured I'd throw this out there.

    While I was up on the roof, I noticed that the chimney needs to be repointed. The existing mortar is in pretty rough shape and it looks like it's been repointed once before. It's bad enough that I can almost guarantee leaks despite the new flashing.

    Anyway, I think I've got a pretty reasonable handle on how to do it, but I'm definitely open to advice/suggestions from those that have some experience... I plan on chiseling/grinding out the old and using a mortar bag and tuckpointer to replace it. Beyond the dirty work of grinding, getting a proper mortar mix together and repacking it (not letting it dry too quickly), is there something obvious I'm missing?

    Thanks again... Maybe when I get all this house stuff sorted I'll have more machine-related questions

  • #2
    Home Show Masonry

    I can't brag on my skills as a mason but I do watch a lot of shows like Hometime and This Old House. There was a project on TOH where they had to repoint the front fascade of a townhouse. The mason made a point of mentioning that you need to take a brush with some water and dampen the joints before you add the new mortar. This aids in bonding the old to the new. This seems to be true of patching concrete also.

    Good luck with the project!
    Jim (KB4IVH)

    Only fools abuse their tools.

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    • #3
      Actually, do it more than once...... get the old brick soaked, but no drops/pools etc should be present, just damp brick.

      Otherwise the old brick will suck the water out of the mortar and it won't set right. It does not "dry", it chemically sets, water is needed.

      Covering with a wet tarp afterwards in hot or dry weather helps also.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        It won't hurt to sprinkle it after you get the morter in to keep it from setting up too fast.

        If you use the morter bag you want to pick up a morter "tool" for tooling in the morter once it starts to setup. Then if you have a conventional shop wire brush with wooden handle you can brush the joints after the glaze or sheen goes away. If it's still to wet to brush it will load your brush just like a file gets loaded. When It's just right you can cut the excess morter out of there slicker than owl-$hit in no time flat with the brush. This brush leaves the edges of joint an equal distance, normally about 1/8" back from edge of morter. It's optional but if the rest of the chiminey is brushed you should brush your repair for looks.

        Using the morter bag requires a pretty wet mix. It also requires you to rinse the bag in a bucket of water to keep it clean. This raises hell with your knuckles as the sand wears off your knuckles in short order.

        You can also use the flat dum-a-flotchet with a "pointing trial". It's the long skinny trial. The advantage here is you can use dryer cement (stronger).

        Have a good time. I'd help you but I gotta wash my hair or something !! I did that for about 7 years when I worked stone with the old man some 43 or so years ago. Hell, I'd rather put up a mailbox in the frozen tundra and blowing winds then do any more of that !!
        Last edited by Your Old Dog; 01-10-2007, 01:40 PM.
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

        It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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        • #5
          I'm with YOD on the trowel to hold the mortar mix and a pointer trowel to push it in the joins wet the joints and surrounding brick well, and use a tighter/dryer mortar mix. Pack it in solid so it just about fills the space. When it kicks and start to set you can run the joint with the rounded finishing tool or the wood handle end of a trowel or file handle that fits the surface between the bricks if they are rounded off. I think it called dressed.
          To long ago in a galaxey far, far away. The only other advice I can give is don't step back to admire your work when on a roof
          Last edited by PTSideshow; 01-10-2007, 11:00 PM.
          Glen
          Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
          I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
          All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PTSideshow
            The only other advice I can give is don't step back to admire your work when on a roof
            Of if you're like me, don't get off the roof till your done! It's awful hard to go back up once you're finished with lunch. That was the hardest part of working height for me!
            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
            Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

            It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

            Comment

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