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Micrometers carriage stops.

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  • Micrometers carriage stops.

    I just sold my 9" lathe and let my carriage stop go with it. Just a simple aluminum lamp that took a bar stop or DI as required.

    But now I don't have one for my Rockwell, so I will be making a new one soon. Question is, which kind this time? My skills have improved since the last was made as it was, in fact, one of the very first items I made after getting my mill. The way I see, there are 2 options for upgrading my simple stop.

    1) Get a Mic body and make another simple stop similar to the old one. But, instead of a bar clamped where desired, it would have the Mic body to provide very precise adjustments up to 1". I've got some old 1" Mics that I might be able to salvage the barrel, but I don't know if it is removable (not obvious how, but I've not really looked yet). Are these things generally removable? What is the best source for this purpose? And of course, I could still use the DI as needed. And the over all design will be improved.

    2) Go all the way with a dedicated Micrometer stop ala SoutBend et. al. The ones with an screw and a micrometer wheel trapped inside a bracket. This wouldn’t be too hard to accomplish as I already have a piece of 1/2 x 10 precision acme thread that I used to replace my tailstock screw. I would then just need to make the thumb wheel, and stamp 10 graduations into the circumference. That alone would get me 0.01 resolution. A set of vernier hashes would then get me 0.001 resolution if desired. Seems simple enough, but then I would need another for the DI, should I decide I need one. Probably not since I now have a digital (HF) po’ boy DRO.

    Just kicking thing around. Too many “in progress” projects as it is, but this one is something I feel I need to make to finish the other projects, now that I no longer have a hard stop. Those who have them, is it really worth the hassle to build #2? I really never saw a particular need for such a thing on my previous implementation. Generally, I just set the carriage relative to some feature, used the DI to measure offset, then lock the saddle and replace the DI with the rod for a hard stop (so I don’t have to keep chasing the DI needle unless I have multiple offsets, which is rare). <shrug>

    Any thoughts?
    Last edited by BadDog; 01-13-2007, 03:59 AM.
    Russ
    Master Floor Sweeper

  • #2
    Bad dog:
    This subject was kicked around on the board just a couple weeks ago many good Ideas and photos. look over this thread also there may be more info in the archives.
    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...erial+for+stop
    Tin
    Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

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    • #3
      Thanks, I saw that one, even participated. And you’re right, it shows some very good examples of style #1. But I’m still wondering about the “added value” of making one in style #2, as well as where to source the micrometer barrels if I go with another rendition of #1.

      Edit: Oh, and I LOVE that cam lock design! I think I'll be trying to use that either way.
      Last edited by BadDog; 01-13-2007, 12:51 PM.
      Russ
      Master Floor Sweeper

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      • #4
        You might consider some of these, that way you can remove them at will and go with the rod for faster less critical work.

        http://cgi.ebay.com/STARRETT-MICROME...QQcmdZViewItem
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        • #5
          BadDog,
          I have an old micrometer you can have for the price of the shipping if you want to try that route. You would just need to take off the frame.

          I personally would stay away from any kind of a stop that clamps on the ways. If you get a chip under it and clamp it down you can ding the ways. I have seen quite a few lathes with ways that were dinged up from clamp on stops.

          I would try to build a stop that mounts on the apron and is indexable for different depths. Mount a sliding stop to the side of the bed. One shop I worked in had a Leblond lathe that was like that.
          Mark Hockett

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          • #6
            YOD:
            Thanks, I'll keep an eye on that.

            Mark:
            Thanks. How do you remove the body on those things? On mine, looks like they have to be cut off.

            Good point on the indexed stops, I had forgotten about those. I guess you are talking about the ones with a hub and 4-6 threaded rods? So I guess that is a "#3" style.

            And how are you talking about mounting to the side of the bed? I have a 1" dia ball detent DI mount next to the head stock that reaches out about 12". But on longer work, it would be useless.

            I'm not too concerned about clamping to the ways. For one, mine are hardened (so they would wind up in the clamp), and for another, I don't work in a production shop so I take my time to ensure there are no chips and such. But I do know what you are talking about since I have an L00 backing plate on a Buck chuck (came with my lathe) that is all but ruined by the PO by embedded chips. Fortunately the hardened spindle shows no damage.
            Russ
            Master Floor Sweeper

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            • #7
              Can I muddy the waters?

              I would go with the best of both worlds. In that I mean I would make a stop with a DI and a fine threaded bolt. The bolt would be the stop the DI would give you a precise way to change the setting of the stop.

              If you haven't go the picture in your mind yet just post and I will describe it better.

              Thanks,
              Paul

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              • #8
                That's pretty much what I built last time, but without the threads on the rod, it was just a friction fit.

                Sounds like the general response is KISS. So I suppose, since I just need this built to do another project (not meant to be a "project" in it's own right), I will just do a nicer version of the last one. Maybe even threaded this time...
                Russ
                Master Floor Sweeper

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                • #9
                  Here's an image of a SB multi stop. While it doesn't have a micrometer head, it can be very handy for turning multiple shoulders or grooves AND parting off. If anyone would like to see other views of it, please send a PM.

                  I suppose you could even make a multi stop with a position that holds a long reach DI. Den

                  Last edited by nheng; 01-13-2007, 09:37 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Yep, that's what I was adding as the #3 style. Really looks pretty straight forward. There is the collar with integral V-way notch plus clamp bar; pretty much like all the rest but with a larger precision bore. Then a hub to fit in the bore with a smooth no slop slip fit and threaded on each end; drilled and threaded for rods as needed. Add 2 threaded (and in this case knurled) nuts to retain the hub (or one nut and one shoulder on the hub) and you're there. Might even add a ball detent with spring for a finishing touch. It would be a fun little project just for the sake of doing it, but I never do enough repetitive stuff for it to really pay off.

                    Very nice and detailed pic. Thank you.
                    Russ
                    Master Floor Sweeper

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                    • #11
                      Here is a picture of the one I made about a year and a half ago. I tapped the wheel with a 1/2-20 tap and cut the thread to fit tight. The frame is welded together from 2 pieces. I engraved the wheel with my little home made indexing spindle and made a fixture to stamp the numbers with 1/16" stamps.

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                      • #12
                        BadDog,
                        I'm not really sure how you get the frame off. There is the outer sleeve that has the graduations on it that is pressed on and can be rotated to calibrate. Under the sleeve is a brass section that might screw in to the frame.

                        The lathe I was talking about had a fixture coming out of the side of the bed. There was a rod you could slide that the stop would hit. The stop was indexable. Most of the new gear head style lathes this would be hard to do on.
                        I would like to mount a channel with a T-slot to the side of my bed and an indexable type of head to the apron. The T-slot would have an adjustable pad kind of like the t-slot on the edge of a BP mill table.
                        Mark Hockett

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                        • #13
                          Guys forget taking micrometers apart - I'm pretty sure the barrel is pressed into the frame - you'll ruin them trying to take them apart.

                          You can buy imported mic heads from Travers for $20, or from Penn Tool for $12..


                          HTRN
                          EGO partum , proinde EGO sum

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by HTRN
                            Guys forget taking micrometers apart - I'm pretty sure the barrel is pressed into the frame - you'll ruin them trying to take them apart.

                            You can buy imported mic heads from Travers for $20, or from Penn Tool for $12..


                            HTRN
                            Nope , done loads as adjustment screws for laser mirrors.
                            Mic heads are about £25 to £30 here in the UK.
                            I can get import mic's for £8.00 and when you want 12 to a laser that's some saving.
                            Just grind the frame away on the bench grinder, get as close as you can and then lever the head away from the body. Have the mic nearly closed at this point for strength.

                            If you are unfortunate enough to grind into the head it doesn't matter as that part is hidden in the holder.
                            Sounds drastic grinding a micrometer but you only want the head the frame is scrap.

                            .
                            .

                            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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