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But How Do They Start It: Drawing Wire In Dies

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  • But How Do They Start It: Drawing Wire In Dies

    I have heard many times that wire is drawn through successive dies until it is the size desired. But, how do they start the wire in each die? In a production situation, there must be a fast way, I would think an automatic way of threading the wire turough those dies. It would be a larger size and would not go through easily. So how do they start it in a succession of dies?

    Just curious. I have no intension of making wire.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  • #2
    Maybe the end of the wire is tapered? Maybe the dies could clamp onto the rod? I'd like to know too.
    You never learn anything by doing it right.

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    • #3
      See here:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wire#Production
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        Here is the site for all you want to know. Pick a plate page they have pdf instructions for using them and the pliers and or draw benches. They have more shapes and sizes than you can buy or use. I have a round, square and triangle one I'm still trying to find the hexagon one I seen at one time.
        http://www.contenti.com/products/dra...rawplates.html They also have them for drawing wood dowels thru for modeling wood saling ship building mostly. https://www.micromark.com/
        has them
        And yes you do point what ever you are drawing thru the plate along with some lube and everybody has their favorite lube. you start with the smallest hole it will go thru and work your way down each hole to you get to the size you want.

        You can also draw sheet into tubing, This involes mandrels and more time and pointed end to start. With lots of annealing in between draws.
        Glen
        Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
        I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
        All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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        • #5
          We draw wire rod down to size to make parts in cold formers. I assume you may be talking about electrical wire but it is basically the same. We normally taper the end with a grinder and feed it thru the draw die and hook it to the capstan with the chain and clamp on the wire drawer. We also have pigtail makers which stretch the wire on the end to make it thinner to feed into the die but we don't use those often. Once the wire is feed into the drawer we continue to weld the next coil on until it is time to setup for a different size.

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          • #6
            The wire end has to be reduced in diameter enough to thread through the die then it can be pulled through to connect to the tension pulleys which actually pulls the wire through the die. In multiple drawing machines the wire is put through successive die of decreasing size and can go through 10 to 12 sets(copper wire). The dies in the copper wire industry are made of diamond for the small sizes and carbide in the larger sizes the dies have a front and back which have differing 'attack' angles, the smaller sizes are not easy to determine the correct Orientation. If the dies is used in reverse it builds up particles of copper which eventually will break the wire, which is were I used to come in by examining the wires using a SEM in which you can see the wire has a tension break indicating reversed die.
            I think your question is good because I do not know how they threaded the small wires 0.003 in diameter through the dies!!!
            Also the original copper bar was continuously cast this was then drawn into 0.5" rod which was spooled onto carriers and the only limit on the wire length was the lorries carring it!!
            Peter
            I have tools I don't know how to use!!

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            • #7
              Larger rod can be tapered in a "pointer", kind of reminds you of a huge pencil sharpener. If the rod is too big for a pointer, a production, or hand mill can be setup to cut the end small enough to start.
              Do a google search on Schumag machines to see a production drawing/straightening machine, that should get you some videos too.
              The lead in angle of the dies is the "approach". The wire will wear a ring in the carbide where it first contacts the approach. I used to hate polishing the rings out!

              Kevin

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              • #8
                If you're talking about gold, silver or copper you hit the end very lightly with a planishing hammer till it will stick thru the first dye hole far enough that you can get a bite on it with some smooth faced duck billed pliers. After you draw it one or two times (in the case of fine gold) you pass the wire quickly thru a birthday candle flame and it immediately goes limp and it's ready for another draw. You keep the draw plates lubricatd with bees wax.

                Once you start to draw, it's best to have plenty of room so you don't have to stop and start on the same pass. Sometimes it breaks if you do that.
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                • #9
                  The wire may be streached in a pointing machine. Once the wire is streached, it is cut at the reduced area and started in the drawing die.

                  I have in the past made grippers for a pointing machine. These were for larger sized wire, or rods up to 3/4 inch diameter. The ones I worked on
                  had blunt threads, or carbide sintered into the dies to grip the wire.

                  Some wire cut EDM's also have a built in pointer to reduce the wire to start it in the guides. These machines have a current to heat the wire that is streached by hand and clipped in the thinned area.

                  This wire may vary from a couple thou to .015" diameter.

                  Kap

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                  • #10
                    See how they make it tonight!!

                    Just saw that on "How's is made" on the Discovery Channel. Probably one the of best shows on. In a half hour, they will show you how 4 things are produced. Make a point to see it. It currently is on between 5:00 and 6:00est.

                    Just checked the line up and that show with how wires are made is on tonight at 5:00 - Don't miss it. It also might be on Jan 27 at noon.

                    Jeff

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PTSideshow
                      I'm still trying to find the hexagon one I seen at one time.
                      [
                      This thread?:

                      http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=20087

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                      • #12
                        Most interesting. Sometimes the simplest answer is the best.
                        Paul A.

                        Make it fit.
                        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                        • #13
                          Here we use what we call a swedging die to get wire started for our ball headers (we use wire up to .250"), its a machine that uses two blocks with semicircular cutouts that form a "hole" when placed together, the machine slams the blocks together while spinning them around, as you feed the wire in it smashes the wire size down a bit so it fits in the draw die.
                          Last edited by elcaminos; 01-19-2007, 12:43 AM.
                          Andrew
                          Machinist Apprentice
                          Some of my creations

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                          • #14
                            Yep just like that only in fractional sizes , but I didn't forget I posted that one to the thread when I was searching the net for the fractional one. Thanks anyways the mind is the 1st, 2nd, or 3rd thing to go.
                            Glen
                            Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                            I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                            All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              jewellers use these:

                              the rolls at the bottom are for making wire square and smaller. first you roll the wire to almost appropriate size and then the first inch or so is made thinner so it fits through the drawplate.
                              then something like this is used to do the drawing:

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