Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

"Passivate" or "Neutralize" 12L14 rust tendencies

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • "Passivate" or "Neutralize" 12L14 rust tendencies

    Is there any way to effectively neutralize the tendency of 12L14 to rust quickly? Just want to keep it bare but a little less "rustable".

  • #2
    Starrett M1....or Boeshield, but the Starrett seems to be the exact same stuff, is cheaper and works just as well...plus the can is prettier

    Comment


    • #3
      I forget why 12L14 rusts so quickly but what I'm wondering is if there's a way to chemically treat the surface to remove or change whatever promotes the rust.

      Comment


      • #4
        12L14 should blue well.
        Todd

        Comment


        • #5
          Something that will seal the surface. A high polish? A hot blueing? Plating?

          Is the piece handled by human hands?
          Gene

          Comment


          • #6
            Yeah, if you get your fingerprints on 12L14, those will rust up first. It does look kinda neat to have your fingerprint rusted into a part tho. I usually just spray my parts with wd40 and then put them into a bag until their needed for assembly. If it's a finished part that is going to be exposed then I dunno other then plating or painting.
            Last edited by pballdan; 01-20-2007, 06:18 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              After I finished the parts for a steam engine that had many 12L14 parts, and before assembly, I gave each one a coat of paste wax and buffed it out good. That was 2 years ago and still no rust. The engine is kept indoors and the humidity is not that high in the house but I think the wax helps.

              Comment


              • #8
                If you mean finished parts, having them black oxide treated helps alot to deter rust. If you mean the whole 12 foot bars lying around, Starrett M1.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The rust that so quickly covers free machining steels is due to the lead in the steel eutectic. It forms millions of tiny galvanic cells. The lead is lower in the electomotive sequence and the iron is higher. In the presence of moisture (even atmospheric humidity) the bare metal commences a corrosion cell that once started cannot be stopped even with barrier coatings. It's surface chemistry pure and simple. If zinc embued free-machining properties as an alloy constituent, the stuff would have greater corrosion resistance.

                  Forget about using leaded steel. I've used it maany times before and I love the freedom and productivity it gives me. 4140 at 1000 fet per minute? !! Wow!. BUT: I won't have it in my shop becuase of the problems associated with my tendancy to grab the nearest piece of scrap for welding jigs. Whenever you use free machining alloys containing lead or sulfur you lose strength, heat treatability, weldability, wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and fatigue resistance.

                  Using free machining materials for routine home shop projects is something like never taking the training wheels off your bicycle. This stuff has its place in manufacturing particularly where the higher price of the material is offset by lower tooling costs and higher production. In the home shop where finished surfaces are intended to have esthetic appeal, the higher propensity for rust in leaded steels argues against their use.

                  Sooner or later you who prefer free machining materials are going to have to learn to get good finishes on non-free machining materials. Sooner is better. The tricks are few and not that difficult.
                  Last edited by Forrest Addy; 01-20-2007, 10:22 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Have you heard of "Rig"? It worked pretty well on firearms. In fact, when you have the gun blued you have to tell the person doing the bluing wether or not the gun has been coated in "Rig" It's been a good many years since I've used it worked well for me. Much better than anything else I had around because even if I wd40 on stuff, just opening a some bluing salts and acid bottles on the bench would insure you'd have really ugly rust in a day or two after just using wd40
                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm with Forrest Addy on this one. --I like the chrome vanadium steels when I need to make something with any strength and esthetics. I think 4130, 4140, 4340 machine beautifully. At the right speed, with a small (.030 or less) radius, one can get pretty damn near a mirror finish right off the lathe.

                      steve stas

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X