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Controlling Swarf, Chips & Flying Razor Blades?

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  • Controlling Swarf, Chips & Flying Razor Blades?

    How do you go about putting a chip breaker line on a brazed carbide tool? Or at least control the swarf? I was cutting a Model T axle which, according to old Ford documents, is pretty close to 4140. It's tempered down to a depth of about 1/8" but after that it's like stone (or at least RC-50). I was able to cut it but anything over .010 DOC came off in springs. Heavier cuts at .030 DOC drew off long bands of flat razor wire with a hacksaw edge. When part of it got hung up on the tool post, it backed up and got snagged by the chuck and started flailing all over. I hate when that happens.

    This is a rocker tool post with Armstrong bit holders so no "problem solved with NEW this or NEW that ..." ideas please. I don't have time to wait on new tooling. (Or the want of it.)

    I'm using C6 AR's but should I shape the bit or use a different one?

  • #2
    Use a dremal tool with some of those diamond wheels from wal-mart or harbor freight. Just grind a little grove across the top parallel to the cutting edge. Works for me.
    Last edited by lane; 01-31-2007, 10:11 PM.
    Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
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    • #3
      Yep those diamond cut off disks from harbor freight.
      Tin
      Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

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      • #4
        I guess I'll give that a try. I thought about that but was afraid of inducing a fracture line. Did you carry it out to the edge?

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        • #5
          Get some inserts with molded chip breakers and forget the old fashioned brazed cutters.

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          • #6
            A better tool with a chip breaker and running the feed up un roughing passes helps. .010-.015.

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            • #7
              Clamp a chip breaker on top of the tool.
              Just got my head together
              now my body's falling apart

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Swarf&Sparks
                Clamp a chip breaker on top of the tool.
                This I have to see. Got a pic?

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                • #9
                  Nope, but it aint that hard a concept.
                  Unless you're talking indexed inserts and you buy them in chip-breaker profile anway.
                  Just got my head together
                  now my body's falling apart

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                  • #10
                    Uh huh,sure

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                    • #11
                      What's an insert?
                      And how do you clamp 'em down in that little square hole?


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                      • #12
                        Clamped chip breaker

                        Its actually very easy to 'clamp' a chip breaker onto the cutting tool... Just silver solder/braze it on.

                        Another option would be to anneal it, if that is an effect of heat treating (I've never cut metal that was harder on the inside than the outside).

                        And as said before, try higher feeds. Even if you slow down your speed but take a deeper cut and faster feed you'll likely get better chipping.

                        Pat

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                        • #13
                          Ken,while joining us the the year 2007 would be first choice, you can in fact clamp a chipbraker over top of what you have.

                          Use a toolbit one size smaller that the holder takes,cut a shim to fit along side to take up the slack there.

                          Now,find a piece of toolsteel about 1/8" thick,thin it down on one end so it fits on top of the toolbit and under the holder's clamp bolt.Clamp it in place on top of the tool bit,turn the tool over and scribe the outline of the toolbit's tip on the bottom.Remove the strip and grind back to the line with about a 5-7*angle so it slants back from the cutting edge when installed.Do all of this making sure the piece makes tight contact with the top of the carbide.If there is the slightest gap swarf will catch there and wadd up .

                          Once it's fit and your happy with it,heat treat the business end of it and leave it glass hard.Install it and let it setback from the cutting edge about .020",clamp it down and go to work.You may need to adjust it forward or back to get it to work right.
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by wierdscience
                            Ken,while joining us the the year 2007 would be first choice, ...
                            LOL... Hey I did! I made adapters for the computer wheel balancer to do Model T and Model A wheels.

                            Now if I can just get the tip of a center drill out of the 1095 hex stock.

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                            • #15
                              Was gonna try a short vid of the process today but my old lappy's locked up. Don't think it likes XP
                              Anyway, I think a couple of the above posts explain it adequately.

                              FWIW, I use clamped on breakers regularly when turning 316 SS but I just grind the end of the tool (0° top rake) and clamp on the breaker in my turret style holder.
                              Just got my head together
                              now my body's falling apart

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