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  • MLA Filer Kit question

    Guys,
    Have any of you guys made one of the Metal Lathe Assessories filers. http://www.statecollegecentral.com/m...he/MLA-18.html
    and if so do do you have any comments Ideas also if so did you belt or direct drive it. also is there maybe something else out there.
    thanks
    archie =) =) =)

  • #2
    My friend, Lane, who is a member of the group here, has made one. Hes at work during day, but usually cks in in the evenings.
    If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Bill Pace
      My friend, Lane, who is a member of the group here, has made one. Hes at work during day, but usually cks in in the evenings.
      Thanks Bill
      archie =) =) =)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by jeep534
        Guys,
        Have any of you guys made one of the Metal Lathe Assessories filers. http://www.statecollegecentral.com/m...he/MLA-18.html
        and if so do do you have any comments Ideas also if so did you belt or direct drive it. also is there maybe something else out there.
        I made one many years ago, hooked it up with a couple of V sheaves and a belt as a temporary measure and it still has them. I think it would be better with more mass on the shaft, and I think if making up a flat belt and a couple of pullies once in a while. One mistake I made in machining it was in picking the wrong reference on the main casting. Just clean up the bottom then create a horizontal reference indicating the horizontal shaft boss and bore in. Use that reference for the top of the casting and make the vertical shaft intersect.

        Like all of the stuff I've gotten from Andy it's a nice kit with good castings and drawings. I've gotten a lot of use from the filer over the years, makes for fast cleanup on castings and the like.

        Comment


        • #5
          So this kit has been around for some time. I was thinking about the mass thing myself. how fast (rpm) does yours turn
          and do you think a sewing machine type motor and round belt would drive it or it is it more like a 1/4 Hp and Vee belt size.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jeep534
            So this kit has been around for some time. I was thinking about the mass thing myself. how fast (rpm) does yours turn
            and do you think a sewing machine type motor and round belt would drive it or it is it more like a 1/4 Hp and Vee belt size.
            More like a 1/4 horse, you're trying to overcome the Scotch yoke as well as drive the file. I just went and checked mine, it's got a 1/4 house Leeson and is running the filer at 1200 rpm on the filer input shaft. Sounds a little high, offhand, but seems to work pretty well.

            If you make one try and find the files first. The shaft design calls for Type A machine files (they cut on the draw stroke and are parallel {equal width along the cutting area}) and they can be fairly hard to find. I'd be tempted to find a supply of files and to make the shaft to fit them, just find the "parallel machine files" before you start.

            Let's see if I can inject an image here:

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            • #7
              Does the yoke run in an oil bath? And I wonder if a multipurpose adapter can be fitted for various files. Any hint of the Scotch yoke wearing the vertical shaft or its bushing? Seems like it would not take long to wear the hole oblong given the extremes of leverage with that arrangement. A second guide rod out the bottom would help.

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              • #8
                rkepler, if I'm thinking straight this morning, which I won't guarantee, if the filer is direct drive running at 1200 rpms does that mean that the file is running at 1200 strokes per minute or is there a gear reduction inside the case? That does seem to be a bit fast but as long as it works that is all that matters. Do the files last for a pretty long time on it? I looked at these at Cabin Fever this year. It looks like it could be handy for certain things. With the table mounted the way that it is, do you find that it is rigid enough to not deflect after setting a part on it and working with it? I know it's a lot of questions but I felt like playing 20 questions this morning. Thanks for any or info you can share with us.
                Jonathan P.

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                • #9
                  Oil Bath

                  Yes it runs in a oil bath. Nice unit.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Andy Loftquist's kits are well made and of quality materials with easy to follow plans. I have not built the die filer, but have seen it.

                    Driving with a belt versus direct driving it will permit pulley changes to provide speeds suitable to the job, where with direct drive, it is one speed only. I suggest a solid base that can be clamped to the bench when in use as pressure against the work and the vibration will cause you to be chasing the machine around when in use. A 1/4 HP 1725 RPM motor is recommended and I would stay within that size range, a lower RPM would not hurt.

                    The kit includes directions for making your own files from common files rather than using die files. Commercial die files are expensive and hard to find, and the home made will work just as well and will fit the machine with out further modifications.
                    Jim H.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by japcas
                      rkepler, if I'm thinking straight this morning, which I won't guarantee, if the filer is direct drive running at 1200 rpms does that mean that the file is running at 1200 strokes per minute or is there a gear reduction inside the case? That does seem to be a bit fast but as long as it works that is all that matters. Do the files last for a pretty long time on it? I looked at these at Cabin Fever this year. It looks like it could be handy for certain things. With the table mounted the way that it is, do you find that it is rigid enough to not deflect after setting a part on it and working with it? I know it's a lot of questions but I felt like playing 20 questions this morning. Thanks for any or info you can share with us.
                      In order:

                      1200 strokes per minute, yup. That was measured with a tach on the shaft. Given a stroke length of an inch that's 100 sfm, probably a bit fast if I did a lot of steel, most of the filing work is bronze and cast iron.

                      Files seem to last OK on it, I can't recall wearing one out.

                      The table mount is pretty stiff, once locked in place it pretty much stays there. It is a PITA to get square, requiring either 3 hands or some patience, I'm more likely to find the 3 hands.

                      The oil bath is pretty cool, even has a hole up the shaft to squirt oil on the yoke assembly. Nice little project.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        How do you think a dc treadmill motor would do as a power source for one of these filers? Seems it would be a cheap and easy way to get variable speed if pulleyed up properly. My dc motor on my little lathe runs to I belive 4000 rpms. So if it was pulleyed up at say a 2 to 1 or 3 to 1 ratio with the variable speed you should be able to slow it down nicely and run it up pretty fast as needed depending on the material. After seeing yours rkepler I believe it would be kind of handy to have around. Do you find that you use yours a lot or does it sit a lot?
                        Jonathan P.

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                        • #13
                          I built one a few years ago works real well . I use a 1/3 HP motor running flat belt and used mla pulley besign but made it from 4in dis steel the files ate easw to make up and i made a hold set when i made them up . Do have two sugections though .add a oil cup on the drive shaft housing and a fill plug some where near the top and a check oil level plug adout bottom center od shaft.the unit is easy to build and well designed should last a life time.
                          Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
                          http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
                          http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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                          • #14
                            Thanks a bunch guys this has been a big help
                            archie =) =) =)

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