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  • Horizontal Band Saw Questions/Problems

    I just got my new Horizontal Band Saw and used it for the first time. I was cutting aluminum tubing and solid 6" diameter bar stock. The problem I am having is the the cuts are not straight. The 6" diameter piece was suppose to be 1/2" thick. It started out as 1/2" thick but when the saw blade came out the other side, the section was 1" thick. The same thing was true with the 1 1/2" tubing I was cutting. The cut was not perpendicular to the axis of the tube. I had the blade guides as close as I get them to the stock being cut. Being brand new, there shouldn't be any wear or play in any of the parts.

    Do I need to make/do some other adjustments to the machine? Appreciate any wisdom to solve this problem. Thanks.

    Bill
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

  • #2
    This is a pretty common problem - the general advice is:

    1) Adjust the blade guides so the blade is square with the work piece. (the bearings are on a cam type set-up so you can turn them one way or the other to twist the blade)

    2) Get a new blade! The HF blades suck and may cut crooked in solid stock since rake may not be the same. A quick and dirty trick is to take a piece of abrasive stone and run it along the side of the blade that the blade tends to track towards.

    3) I can't remember the third piece of advice... check the archives or wait for some one who knows what they're talking about to chime in...


    From my expierence - the problem is usually with a crumby blade. I bought one of the bi-metal ones from enco. They work great.

    Comment


    • #3
      A bandsaw bade will cut off to one side. This hapens on wood how you adjust in wood is draw a straight line on piece of wood parallel side cut freehand about 3" or half way throw wood. Stop and do not move piece adjust fence to side of wood and tighten. now comlpeat cut and it will be parallel to side.

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      • #4
        BigBoy1 "Is this one of those 4x6 saws?Just wondering . There is a Yahoo group for the 4x6's. If you join go to photo sec then go to skip Cambell photo's he has a good photo of how to sq saw.( A pic is worth a 1000 words ) Then follow Fasttracks advice.He is right on target IMHO. Chris

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        • #5
          Suggest check if the blade is verticle,
          you may have cut too close to a weld and wiped out one side of the blade, run your hand over the blade (careful) to check both sides for blade teeth setting.
          If the saw ever worked correctly, it may be shot.
          my two cents worth
          Herm Williams

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          • #6
            Here's the one cmiller is probably referring to?
            "The men the American people admire most extravagantly are the greatest liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth." H. L. Mencken

            "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident."

            "When fear rules, reason and logic are ruled out."

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            • #7
              slow up the rate it moving down at.

              On my saw there is an adjustment to decrease the rate at which the blade descends into the workpiece . If it descends too fast it will tend to want to wander.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Yankee1
                On my saw there is an adjustment to decrease the rate at which the blade descends into the workpiece . If it descends too fast it will tend to want to wander.
                That's always been my problem. When I get the downfeed pressure right it does much better but it ain't an accurate machine like a lathe or mill It would be nice to have a calibrated downfeed setting so that once you figured out what it was for aluminum you could always dial in the same setting and not have to feel it out by hand (not that feeling it out by hand is a bad thing).
                - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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                • #9
                  Appreciate Suggestions

                  However, I have tried all that have been sugested. The blade is brand new. These are the first pieces I cut with. I did have the roller guides set as close to the work as possible. The machine is a 7 by 12. The blade "looks" to be vertical when the cut is started and then slowly "cocks" off to an angle and ends up making an angle cut, not one that is perpenduclar to the axis of the stock. The down pressure can be regulated and I did have a time adjusting it. The blade would "catch" and stop cutting until I raised it slightly and readjusted the down pressure. I'll try cutting some flat pieces. I'm wondering if the fact that the blade's first contact with the round stock is a "one tooth" point contact and a with a flat piece it is a "many tooth" contact.
                  Bill

                  Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

                  Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    BigBoy1, I don't know how the 7x12 is arranged but on my little old Craftsman/Atlas, the blade has to go thru a little twist before the guide wheels force it to be vertical. I still need to work on it as I suspect the wheels need to go slightly toward over-correcting to get the travel right. The old hydraulic downfeed cylinder works decently, though.

                    You might try to alter/shim or whatever, the mounting system for the guide wheels to give yourself more adjustment. After that, the only other things that make a big difference are blade tension and blade quality as mentioned. Den

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                    • #11
                      Since you have gone through the other basic set-ups and adjustments...a couple more.....
                      Have you checked to see that the saw is falling in a straight line ? Or that the bed is 90* to the blade ? I would raise the saw and place a square on the bed. Bring it up close to the blade and slowly lower the blade(motor off) to see what is going on. There arn't a lot of things to be wrong....
                      The blade is not 90* to the bed, the vise is not 90* to the blade,the guides are out of adjustment, the down force is excessive,the blade is whacked, or the saw is defective.

                      Kerry

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                      • #12
                        You might check the down pressure since you stated the blade somtimes catches and you have to lift it to so you start sawing again. When you start cutting round stock contact area is very small then of course it gets larger as you cut into the material. We have a Wells that will wonder almost every time if the down pressure is too great. Anyway let us know what your final solution is.
                        re
                        Herm Williams

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                        • #13
                          The first thing you HAVE to do is be sure the blade is exactly 90deg to the vise table. The way I do it is to space the blade up off the vise table so I can put a 6" machinist square on the table and against the blade. You have to get it between the teeth and against the flat side of the blade. When you have the guides adjusted so there is no day light between the square and the blade it should cut a very square part. You can't eyeball the squareness of the blade, it has to be done with a good machinist square. Another thing is that even if the blade is new it still may cut to one side because the teeth are dull on one side or the set of the teeth is wrong. Sometimes it may take an hour or more to get everything right and when you change blades it may wander again. Saws are not like a lathe or mill, they are very tempermental and need constant attention. As a blade dulls it will cut to one side and will need replacement or adjustment. I like to use bimetal blades as they are stiffer and cut longer and truer.
                          It's only ink and paper

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                          • #14
                            I have a jet band saw and have found that if I set the down feed slow and let the blade do the work it cuts very well... But if I try to force the cut with to much pressure the blade will cut to one side. So I just set it for a slow light cut and come back later.

                            Scott

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Yankee1
                              On my saw there is an adjustment to decrease the rate at which the blade descends into the workpiece . If it descends too fast it will tend to want to wander.

                              Ahh that was the third piece of advice i was trying to remember...

                              Don't make it too slow either or you will just burn the teeth off of your blade.

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