Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

opposite of lubricant

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • opposite of lubricant

    I'm looking for grease like substance which instead of reducing friction, increases friction. I'm think of something like thick resin which will increase friction between surfaces but will not dry and harden. First of all, what are such substance called and what are some sources?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    You could use an abrasive paste like lapping compound.

    If abrasive is out I have found high viscosity oils like STP oil treatment have the affect of increasing resistance between two pieces of metal if the motion is fairly fast. Also would work in a damper where a fluid is used. JRouche
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

    Comment


    • #3
      How about "lubrican" ?

      OK, not a great joke. Oddly enough I've recently wanted the same thing myself. My application isi n a clock, where one piece of metal (a flat spring) needs to engage another (a gear) as sort of a friction clutch. One thing I thought of is to glue a dsk of sandpaper to the gear; that would provide plentiy of friction. Downside is that when one sets the time, the sandpaper will abrade the spring. Another way is to roughen the two parts.

      Good luck,

      Comment


      • #4
        Sounds like what you need is "stiction".
        A quick google only shows anti-stiction coatings tho
        Just got my head together
        now my body's falling apart

        Comment


        • #5
          Belt dressing or "Belt Grip" is sticky. You spray it on a belt, let dry and it keeps it from slipping in high torque applications. At least that's what the can says.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by rotate
            I'm looking for grease like substance which instead of reducing friction, increases friction. I'm think of something like thick resin which will increase friction between surfaces but will not dry and harden. First of all, what are such substance called and what are some sources?

            Thanks.
            I believe that you are referring to shear-thickening or dilatant fluids. One old example is "silly Putty" another is corn starch in water (though you might try ethylene glycol). Just about any solid particulate material in a fluid suspension (slurry) will be shear-thickening, eg clay or sawdust mixed with manual transmission oil. The US Army is working on using this type of fluid to fashion body armor.

            As for not drying out good luck with that spec.

            Comment


            • #7
              A little more info would go a long way.

              What are the surface materials, shape thereof, size, amount of force, speed of motion relative to one another, etc?
              "Lay on ground-light fuse-get away"

              Comment


              • #8
                It's called brake lining.

                Seriously, look at the clutch fans of a decade ago. Negative temp characteristic an all.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Pine tar?

                  [EDIT]:That message was too short so I typed this
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Try the music stores for a product called "gorilla snot" (not kidding).
                    Guitarists use it on picks.
                    Just got my head together
                    now my body's falling apart

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hells bells dude.....whats wrong with a hand full of sand. Looks like to me ye-all trying to of engineer the problem to me

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A visit to an old time radio/tv shop might turn up a product that was used on dial cord mechanisms to help prevent slippage when you tuned stations in. I don't recall the name, but GC chemicals might have it listed still. It was a dry powder, clay colored at least, if not dry powdered clay.

                        Another possible source would be MG chemicals- I think I'm gettng the names right- it's been awhile.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Google 'Traction Oil'. It's been around for years and is used in continuously variable transmissions and one way roller clutches among other things. I have a couple of containers of it as we used to use it on the clutches in copiers.

                          It is a special long chain polymer that resists slipping between surfaces yet still provides a lubricating film to prevent metal to metal contact. In other words, a surface can roll but not slide. It's amazingly effective too.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Its hard to give you an answer with such limited discription but both Forest and Evan are on the same page as I am, If your looking to have something rotate with a certain amount of drag install a viscous coupling, you can come up with mutiple combinations on either having it give under power or having it bind in a no load situation without wear to anything as long as you stay in its rated torque and rpm range, this is what many of the "all time" 4 wheel drive vehicles use to deal with the variation between the front diff. and the rear diff. around a turn, its also used in deviations of tire pressures and uneven weight distribution, its the result of useing a fluid with close tolerances metal parts and therefore uses the viscousity as a friction-driving force, there is no metal to metal contact and as forest has stated they can be thermally controlled by useing a simple bi-metal spring and a fluid port...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There is a big difference between a viscous fluid coupling such as the AMC Eagle used to distribute torque and traction oils. Traction oils have a very high shear strength which is what prevents relative motion between contacting surfaces. They aren't just thick oils and the type I have is quite thin. It resembles ordinary light oil but is colored bright yellow to distinguish it from ordinary lubricant. You don't want to put it on an oilite bushing.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X