Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Gap bed, anybody ever use that feature?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gap bed, anybody ever use that feature?

    I've got a job that requires I pull the gap on my gap bed.
    A machinist at work that I respect highly, says NEVER, EVER pull the gap, that it will never line back up correctly when replaced.

    So I'm REAL hesitant to pull the gap and may try to find another way to the job.

    So what say yea? Anybody use the gap bed capability?
    Ignorance is curable through education.

  • #2
    Used it once in 5 years - and yes, it was a pain to get back perfectly (well as perfectly as I needed).
    Now that I have a better mill & boring head I'd do a similar job on the mill and leave the gap in place.


    Charles

    Comment


    • #3
      Good question! I've wondered about this also, and always read with interest any ones experience with it. I would guess that I've read maybe 6-10 mentions of doing it, and the ratio is DEFINATELY against! BUT, there were a couple times where the guy says he does it "all" the time and never has a problem....... I think I would be in the group of not getting into it, just kinda makes me cringe at thinling about re-aligning.
      If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

      Comment


      • #4
        I have not had a need to pull mine but I have a friend who does it all the time with no problems.
        John R

        Comment


        • #5
          I think it depends to a large degree on th lathe itself. Cast iron requires seasoning to stabilize. Many of the lower price imported machines do not use well seasoned cast iron, and removing the gap can result in problems in returning it.

          Better quality machines should not present a problem.
          Jim H.

          Comment


          • #6
            Im not a lathe guy but have a friend who has two, one is an engine lathe gap bed, I pretty much agree with what JC just said except for one exception, if you do find out that your lathe is quality enough to remove and replace and reposition and is not warped then i propose you pull it every so often wether you need to or not, when working on my bike cranks I had to pull the gap out of the bed and asked my friend "is this going to be a huge deal" and he stated that it is going to take some time but it needs to be done anyways, his reasoning was the two surfaces underneath needed to be cleaned and resealed, sure enough when we pulled it it was starting to go beyond staining and actually build up very small scale, think about what happens with your vise on your mill and times that by ten, it can actually start to effect the material, he took a quick stone at both surfaces and then put some kind of preservative on it when we put it back together,


            So, I not only say pull it, but dependng on what type of coolant you use you might want to make a habit out of it...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by JCHannum
              I think it depends to a large degree on th lathe itself. Cast iron requires seasoning to stabilize. Many of the lower price imported machines do not use well seasoned cast iron, and removing the gap can result in problems in returning it.
              Not to mention the folks who have reported finding paint, bondo, tin can shims, or just dirt under the gap piece. Of course the crud could never be relaced in the correct place to hold the gap correctly.

              However, if the machine is a good one, the feature is intended to be used, and so if it were a Drummond, I'd not worry.

              If it is a "Happy Boy Sino Machine Co" (Jet, Grizzly, Busy bee, Homier, etc) I'd be more worried.
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by J Tiers
                Not to mention the folks who have reported finding paint, bondo, tin can shims, or just dirt under the gap piece. Of course the crud could never be relaced in the correct place to hold the gap correctly.

                .

                Ohh God,,, yeah if thats the case then leave everything alone, if you place a flashlight on the other side and can see light shining through in places then leave it be!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have the gap out in my 15x50- why not ?

                  the lathe builders must have known what they where doing to put a gap in there in the first place.

                  If it never lined up after, there would not be any gap bed lathes .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by thistle
                    the lathe builders must have known what they where doing to put a gap in there in the first place.
                    .
                    In my view, in many cases it is more of a marketing feature than a real asset, particularly in the lighter weight machines where the loss of rigidity is a real issue.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I pull the gap a couple of times a year on the summit for rebuilding certain pumps .

                      The Chinese POS I have at work . I have not pulled it in a while and now it is stuck .

                      So you have to clean them often .

                      I put an indicator on the carriage and tighten the gap until the last word does not move when I run it across the joint.
                      NRA member

                      Gun control is using both hands

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Then there's the question, can you do the job at all if you don't pull it?

                        Jim W.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by drof34
                          Then there's the question, can you do the job at all if you don't pull it?

                          Jim W.
                          Yes but I'll have to muck up my very nice face plate for my dividing head and use the dividing head like a rotary table. Not that big a deal, but I really don't want to muck up that face plate.

                          Sounds like I need to pull the gap anyway just to clean and lube the mating faces; so... nothing ventured, nothing gained I've heard.
                          Wish me luck.
                          Ignorance is curable through education.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Like JCHannum says, it probably depends on the quality of the lathe. Assuming it's well made, taking out the gap piece shouldn't cause a problem.
                            ----------
                            Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                            Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                            Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                            There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                            Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                            Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by x39
                              In my view, in many cases it is more of a marketing feature than a real asset, particularly in the lighter weight machines where the loss of rigidity is a real issue.
                              -Boy howdy.

                              I've been looking at imports for a while, as I've been wanting a somewhat larger lathe than my 10" Logan (higher spindle speed, camlok chuck, etc.) And I'm convinced that you can no longer even buy a non-gap-bed lathe, except for the little-bitty 9x20s and 7x10s.

                              I'm sure gaps would come in handy once or twice, but I'd much prefer the increased rigidity of a solid bed.

                              None of the imports, of any brand, list a non-gap bed, and all of them put the term "gap bed" right in the title description of the lathe, which tells me x39 is right- it's more marketing measure than acutal utility.

                              Doc.
                              Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X