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South Bend Lathe Tool Grinding Jig

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  • South Bend Lathe Tool Grinding Jig

    I have purchased a South Bend Lathe Tool Grinding Jig that has inserts for 1/8", 1/4", 5/16" and 3/8" square tool bits. I have figured out how to grind some of the angles on the bits but don't know how to use the jig to grind the rest of them. Does anyone have a manual or instruction book for the use of this South Bend jig? I'll gladly pay for any reproduction and shippiing costs. Thanks.

    Bill
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

  • #2
    Own a SB10L. Would like to see a picture of the tool grinding jig.
    R W

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    • #3
      Can't help with a manual, but I'd like to see pix of this device. Thanks.

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      • #4
        Bigboy:
        here is a page from the SB lathe manual. I think this is what you are looking for.
        There are some typos from when it was tranlated to electronic format but think you can figure it out.
        And for the folks that have not seen one heare is a nice scketch.



        also here is a guide to angles and tool grinding in general.
        http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j1...Toolangles.jpg
        Hope this helps.
        Tin

        IMHO you may want to make a larger tool rest for the grinder to avoid using the side of the wheel . It is my understanding that using the side of the wheel is not particularly a good practice. I did not write the instuctions just passing them on.
        Last edited by Tin Falcon; 03-24-2007, 12:52 PM.
        Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

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        • #5
          Manual Pages

          Tin,

          That is exactly the set I have and is was what I was looking for. Is it possible for you to send me the file that you posted? I tried to print from the posted note but it didn't work. My e-mail address is:
          [email protected] Thanks.

          Bill
          Bill

          Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

          Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

          Comment


          • #6
            e-mail sent w pdf attachments
            Tin
            Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Tin Falcon
              e-mail sent w pdf attachments
              Tin, could I get a copy of the PDF?

              I seem to remember that someone here made one of those tool griding jigs?
              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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              • #8
                Originally posted by lazlo
                Tin, could I get a copy of the PDF?

                I seem to remember that someone here made one of those tool griding jigs?
                Lazo Check your PM. The block should be easy to make except for the square hole. IIRc there are adapters available but do not recall what they are called or the source.

                SB Lathe manual available here http://www.lathetalk.com/library/tm-...atheManual.pdf
                Tin
                Last edited by Tin Falcon; 03-25-2007, 08:09 AM.
                Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

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                • #9
                  A big thanks

                  Hey Tin,
                  I inherited one of these from my dad's collection of stuff. Something told me not to let it go to the auction. I had no idea what specifically it was for, but now it makes perfect sense.
                  Thanks again,
                  Jim

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                  • #10
                    Bit grinding jig

                    A similar grinding block was covered in HSM's issue Mar/Apr 1987 Pg #44, if you have a copy. I made one back then, using a wooden block and with a round hole in that rotating sleeve (pt #5-8 in that S/B dwg) and it works just fine for the amount I have used it.

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                    • #11
                      Square Hole Sleeves

                      Try here for the sleeves

                      http://www.jergensinc.com/infodir/ca...p?GroupNum=219

                      Rgds
                      Michael

                      Australia

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                      • #12
                        Miker:
                        Thanks for the link that is what I was thinking of. A set of 4 to make the grinding block would be close to $40. plus other materials I am thinking round holes and extra set screws or shaper learning project.
                        I did bookmark the page for reference.
                        Chester
                        what was the set screw configuration to hold the bit in the sleeve 1, 2. 4 and how were they positioned. You are only talking grinding forces here
                        Tin
                        Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

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                        • #13
                          The block Chester describes is also in the Village Press Projects Three book. There are actually two different blocks which are the same principle as the SB version.

                          One by D.E. Johnson uses the Jergens sleeves for square holes for the cutters.

                          The other version, by Pete Peterka, simply uses a hole with a diameter that equals the diagonal of the cutter, with a setscrew on the flat of the cutter to orient it. This eliminates the need for a square hole, and is plenty accurate for most purposes.

                          The angle on the rear of the block is 8 degrees in both cases.
                          Jim H.

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                          • #14
                            Here is how I made one a long time ago… to be honest, I seldom use it. As most know, it is much easier to grind the bits by hand. That being said, it is a great project for someone starting out as it gives them practice on turning precision parts, marking graduations, and the best part - confidence and personal satisfaction! There may be better ways to make one but this seemed logical to me.

                            In the first photo, it shows the entire block holder that is made from pieces of cold rolled steel. The body has an 8-degree bevel on one-half of the bottom dimension. The body is also graduated with a vernier scale so that it can have a resolution of 1-degree (one can estimate to 1/2-degree). There is a hole in the top, which lets a passageway thru the block to a setscrew that is used to clamp the tool bit in place. There is also a cone point setscrew on the top that holds the thimble in place for turning and clamping when the bit is ground. You can see the V-groove for that on the thimble in the other photos. Making it like this will avoid unsightly setscrew marks when clamped and will also prevent the thimble from falling out.

                            The thimble is graduated for every 5-degrees and marked from 0-45-90-45-0. It is hollow and secures various holders for the square bits to be ground. I only have shown one that is used for the 1/4 inch bits. There are two sets screws to hold the bit holders. Note that all setscrews must be small enough in length to allow for clearance. The thimble also has the continuation of the access hole from the block so the bit can be fastened. There is also a V-groove machined in as described previous.

                            All of the square bit holders are made from two flat pieces of cold rolled that are welded together. To make them just mill each side to the correct width for the desired bit and use a piece of key stock or old HSS bit to align while welding. Then lathe to proper outside dimension. I arc welded mine but brazing or silver solder will work just as well since there is not any significant load on these parts. Make one for each bit size desired - I even made one for round HSS bits.

                            I made this from scrap and as one can see the only items that need to be purchased are the setscrews. I think at the time South Bend wanted something around $80.00 for the item. Anyway, I hope this inspires people to realize that not all tooling or accessories need to be purchased.

                            Mike






                            Last edited by Mike Burdick; 03-27-2007, 04:07 PM.

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