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  • Phosphoric Acid

    I need to buy a small quantity to dilute 10 % acid 90 % water to use as a soldering flux,

    Problem where can I buy some in the USA.

    Thanks Graeme

  • #2
    "Naval Jelly" is phosphoric acid.

    Are you sure you want phosphoric acid as soldering flux? Why not just go to a hardware store and get a bottle of "Tinner's Fluid," intended for use as soldering flux? It's some kind of acid, I think hydrochloric acid.
    ----------
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    • #3
      Yup, sold as Baker's Fluid here.
      ZnCl, zinc chloride. Usta be called killed spirits.
      Made by dissolving bits of zinc (old battery cases) in hydrochloric acid.
      Just got my head together
      now my body's falling apart

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      • #4
        You don't want to use phosphoric acid for a soldering flux. The phosphate by products of its fluxing action are almost solder proof. As was sadi above, the besy DIY acid solder flux is "killed" muratic acid where nits of zinc are dropped in the acid until there is more more reaction.

        Nowadays there are better brand name acid fluxes obtainable at your welding supply houses, better plumbering supply sections in big box stores, and radiator shop.

        Any operations where muratic acid - killed or fresh - is employed should take place out of doors away from vehicles and tools. Its fumes drift until they find bare metal where it settles to cause persistant ineradicable corrosion. I won't even bring acid containers into the shop. The acid stuff lives in a plastic picnic cooler along the fence downwind of my shop.

        Phosphoric acid is much kinder stuff. When metal is etched in it, it forms a phosphate coated that retards corrosion and enhances paint adhesion. Still, it's acid and lives in the acid cooler.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by GRH
          I need to buy a small quantity to dilute 10 % acid 90 % water to use as a soldering flux
          Hi Graeme,

          Behr Concrete Etcher & Rust Remover No. 991, available at Home Depot, is 60% phosphoric acid. That's the highest concentration of phosphoric acid I've been able to find short of ordering from a chemical supply company.

          Robert

          Edit: I cross-posted with Forrest. Listen to the Master
          Assuming you're silver soldering (which is really brazing), I use Peterson Silver Solder Flux -- available at any welding supply.
          I suck at silver soldering, but the flux works well
          Last edited by lazlo; 04-04-2007, 12:47 PM.
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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          • #6
            I buy 80% from a local greenhouse supplier. It's used to adjust pH level in hydroponic systems.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              Just about every hardware store and home center sells it. It's sold under various names but look in the paint department or ask for "Metal Prep". Other than the small jars of Navel Jelly, the smallest size will be pint or quart. (Depending on the supplier.) I buy it by the gallons.

              By the way, that will NOT make zinc chloride! If you want to make zinc chloride, you'll need hydrochloric acid--AKA Muriatic Acid.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by CCWKen
                By the way, that will NOT make zinc chloride! If you want to make zinc chloride, you'll need hydrochloric acid--AKA Muriatic Acid.
                Graeme, are you by any chance reading the soldering section of "Machine Tool Operation"?

                This describes the turn-of-the-century "cut acid" flux made by dropping pieces of zinc into a bottle half-full of muriatic (hydrochloric) acid. It's a great book, but it was written in 1919, and there are a lot safer (and probably cheaper) modern fluxes.

                In that book, they also describe "Soldering Irons": copper brands that you heat-up in the forge
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #9
                  I am wondering just exactly what Evan grows hydrophonically, I have read that the very best, ugh, "pain reliever" is grown in liquid medium.
                  "four to tow, two to go"

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by speedsport
                    I am wondering just exactly what Evan grows hydrophonically, I have read that the very best, ugh, "pain reliever" is grown in liquid medium.
                    LOL... I was wondering that myself. He sure ain't growin' grinding wheels.

                    Speaking of liquid medium, we've had more rain in March than we've had for the past two years. The garden is great this year!

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                    • #11
                      Greenhouses are extremely common here. 50% of the tomatoes sold here are greenhouse grown. It's the climate, you know. We have greenhouses so large here in BC they measure them in acres instead of sq feet.

                      Pic of lactuca sativa in greenhouse:



                      The other sativa is not usually grown hydroponically but in pots.
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                      • #12
                        Ah, thus the moniker 'pot plant'. Now I get it--
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Evan
                          The other sativa is not usually grown hydroponically but in pots.
                          Actually, there is a lot of it grown hydroponically. It's often referred to as 'hydro'. It's supposed to be extraordinarily potent with a price to match. An old friend of mine was a big pot head and talked a lot about it. Smoked it from the time he got up until he went to bed at night. Never understood it. My brother's neighbor grew 'hydro' in his basement for his own personal use. Ironically he moved here about 15 years ago.... from BC!
                          The early bird may get the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese.

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                          • #14
                            It's too expensive and time consuming and also dangerous to grow hydroponically. It requires fairly constant attention. With soil the plant has better support as it can grow to at least 6 feet tall or more and with a drip watering system, 24/7 lighting plus CO2 enrichment it can be grown in absentia. Much safer for the grower. It only takes a couple of months when the plants are forced. The main reason for the super potency of today's plants isn't so much the growing technique, it's that they have had the best scientists gene engineering the plants. Money can buy almost anything, especially people as they are relatively cheap.
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                            • #15
                              Somebody say irons. Here are a set of three new old stock.

                              also have the Sal ammoniac blocks thats really old school. As others have said. The prepared fluxes are cheaper, better, safer. you can get an improved liquid flux called battens from art metal suppliers or jewelry suppliers work well on copper and brass.
                              Glen
                              Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                              I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                              All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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