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  • Machine Paint Recommendations?

    Looking for recomendations on what primer (if needed) and paint to use on a couple of my machines. Needs to be something that stands up well to lube and cutting oils. Can be spray can ( if it is durable ) or brush on, and preferably not require a lot of gymnastics to apply. Color should be similar to the Rockwell or Atlas gray. So what's out there and where can I get it?
    Greg

  • #2
    You just opened a can of worms.
    I shot a lathe with automotive acrylic enamel over bare clean metal. But a lot of these guys swear by Runoleum or some such tripe oil.

    Last edited by CCWKen; 04-05-2007, 02:21 AM.

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    • #3
      I painted my Clausing with Sherwin Williams "industrial" enamel. I was going to paint the whole works with a brush but decided that wasn't going to turn out right on large flat surfaces like the stand so I used a spray gun. I wouldn't have any problem with using Rustoleum spray cans such as smoke gray. It is a lathe not a perfect body sports car.

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      • #4
        Mike.. speak for yourself. My lathe is a well tuned, purring cool to the touch, sleek piece of fine Asian quality.

        I would never want to foul it up with just any paint. Only the best for this touch of class. I would use a couple boxes of Wal Mart .89 a can spray bombs. Just think, you would paint the lathe and most likely contribute to global warming!

        Just kidding Feel dumb tonight. I need sleep!
        Life Is Grand

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        • #5
          I need to paint my import lathe but I came to the conclusion that the chiped paint that I caused kind of gives it character. It just wouldn't feel right if the paint was perfect again. Also, I don't feel like taking it apart to paint it.

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          • #6
            Tar and feathers works for me.

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            • #7
              A few years ago I brush-painted an Ammco shaper with Varathane (colors in plastic) after using a can sprayed primer. I got the grey-blue color I wanted by mixing up grey and white with a dab of blue. It is holding up well to the way oil that is slathered on it. I have found that this type of paint works best (no brush marks) when applied at a temperature of about 70 degrees F.

              I am in the process of building the steady rest, from a castings supplied by Metal Lathe Accessories, and have just spray bombed it with two coats of Rustoleum onto the bare metal. Looks good but we'll see how it stands up both to the machining operations and to handling after completion. My thinking is that it won't get used very often.

              By the way this steady rest is a 17lb beauty with a 6" capacity (for pipes/tubing). The sketch on the web site doesn't do it justice. I plan to add a foot to span the ways on my lathe (Standard Modern 11") but the casting is designed to have one added if necessary.

              Geoff

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              • #8
                I've always just used brush-on Rustoleum primer and enamel. Not necessarily the "best," but it works pretty well.

                A friend of mine masked off his lathe, then drove it to an autobody shop and got it shot with Dupont Imron. Since he'd done all the prep work, the cost was pretty reasonable.
                ----------
                Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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                • #9
                  SGW, any idea how well the Imrom is standing up?

                  I once went through the aggravation of taking the lathe apart, sanding, taping, priming etc. used I think Rustoleum and in 6 months it look as bad as when i started. bloody waste of time, the chips just destroyed the finish.
                  .

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mcgyver
                    SGW, any idea how well the Imrom is standing up?
                    "Imron" -- it's a very durable polyurethane enamel. It would be fantastic on a machine tool.

                    I use Sherwin-Williams Polane, which is the only paint made specifically for machine tools. It's a polyurethane enamel designed to be especially solvent and chip/impact resistant.

                    The downsides are that it's expensive: a gallon is ~$50, and a pint of the isocyanate catalyst is $70. It needs to be sprayed, and it's also highly toxic.

                    Edit: the other downside is that once it cures (about 48 hours), it's a friggin' bitch to sand. It's like sanding powdercoat.
                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                    • #11
                      I haven't seen my friend's lathe in a while -- he moved -- but as far as I know it's doing okay. Whether it's doing noticeably better than any other finish would, I don't know.
                      ----------
                      Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                      Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                      Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                      There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                      Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                      Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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                      • #12
                        I have painted several items with Valspar's equipment enamel with the hardener additive they sell. You can buy this a Tractor Supply and other places. TSC's version is branded "BPS" for "Best Paint Sold". The hardener makes a big difference as enamel is normally slow to cure and remains soft. Hardness, gloss, and flowability are all improved with the stuff. The downside is you won't be painting out of the can (which you shouldn't do anyway). You calculate the ratio of hardener to paint and mix it in a separate container because once mixed, the paint is either going on the machine or in the trash.

                        It has worked very well for me in repainting my Bridgeport mill as well as a Kurt vise, Bridgeport vise and some other items.

                        I use their sandable, brushable primer on bare metal, but go easy on the stuff. A thick layer of a softer primer under nice hard paint is not good for durability.

                        Paul
                        Paul Carpenter
                        Mapleton, IL

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                        • #13
                          Sherwin Williams and other paint manufacturers have industrial paint lines using Alklyd enamels. These work pretty well on machine tools, can be brushed or sprayed, are one part and don't need special respirators. These resist oil stains and chemicals pretty well. I used this on my lathe and its been pretty good. No real staining but a little chipping in the heavy chip contact areas of the lathe but not too bad. I imagine one of the 2 part paints would probably resist the chipping better but for me it wasn't worth the hassle, I'll just touch this up in a year or so.

                          Paul T.

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                          • #14
                            I also used Sherwin Williams Industrial on my shaper (brushed on) has good flow and leveling properties to it. I used Rustoleum hammer paint on the lathe and it's doing fine. I figured with it's chipped finish it be easy to touch up when needed. Just degrease well before you apply whatever brand you get that makes all the difference.
                            Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

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                            • #15
                              green undercoat and green topcoat with green pinstripe etc should look like a million dollars Alistair
                              Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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