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  • Stirling Engine

    Well I built the Simple Simon Stirling ( MW Oct 2003 ). Having trouble with the balloon on power piston, just doesn't flex freely. going to try a different cylinder, I'm using 3/4" copper tube, bag of assorted balloon, and 3 sizes of corks have been tried for piston. Then I glued the alum plates to the PVC displacer cylinder with epoxy. when I put heat and ice to it, the plates quickly unglued from the epoxy ....OK another "engineering change"--silicone probly hopefully have enough flex and stick to take thermal growth. I'll let you know when it runs.

  • #2
    Not sure if it's legal, it's not my picture. I don't have a digital camera. Photo is from the Machinist Workshop magazine. I built a stirling engine similar to this one. My first. Got it running today. About 150 rpm....neat little sounds pook....pook....pook Watched it run for 20 minutes at least...wow
    anyway just learning to load a picture here, I promise not to steal any more

    Last edited by Davyboy; 04-11-2007, 12:02 AM.

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    • #3
      Makes you wonder why somebody hasn't made a ceiling fan that uses Stirling methods to use attic head to move air in living quarters. Even here in Seattle the attic is extremely hot. In fact it might even make a good attic cooling fan - there's no shortage of calories up there.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dp
        Makes you wonder why somebody hasn't made a ceiling fan that uses Stirling methods to use attic head to move air in living quarters. Even here in Seattle the attic is extremely hot. In fact it might even make a good attic cooling fan - there's no shortage of calories up there.
        I had a Sterling Engine powered fan that sat on top of the wood stove. As I recall the fan blade was about 10' in dia. and had 5 blades. It worked real well when the stove was blazing hot. But after you turned the stove down to a nice level the fan would slowly fade away. That's when I wanted it to work the most to keep the air moving all day in the house.

        So for me it was basically worthless as a heating aid. and when the guy down the street said he would trade me a drill press for it I traded and gave the drill press to my kid.


        Scott

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        • #5
          That is very low grade heat. Also, you need a temperature difference for a heat engine to work. The amount of difference determines the efficiency. At low temperature differences the efficiency is abysmal. As well, Stirling engines do not scale well in most cases. The dynamics of the engine are a function of the internal volume vs the surface area. Volume increases by the third power of dimensions but surface area only by the second. The correct ratio of each to the other is essential for a Stirling to operate.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            Originally posted by scott96088

            So for me it was basically worthless as a heating aid. and when the guy down the street said he would trade me a drill press for it I traded and gave the drill press to my kid.
            Scott
            I think the bottom line for non-steam external combustion engines is they're pretty much propeller spinners and little else. Rather like those dipping duck toys (http://www.thedrinkingbird.com/?gcli...FReEhgodugp6rQ) that would endlessly dip into a water container like magic. The good old prairie windmill does more work and has for a long time.

            There is one place on earth that is guaranteed to have very hot and very cold water running naturally side by side - Iceland. So what do you think they use for energy conversion?

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