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My, long in the making, project

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  • My, long in the making, project

    The Browning 1919 .30 cal. and the M2 .50 cal, both originally use cloth belts, hand cranked machines were made for filling these belt but due to supply and demand they are currently selling in the neighborhood of $1000.00. So I decided to make one for sale. Although I've always been a tinkerer, I don't have any machining background so I spent a lot of time here, thanks guys, I've learned a lot, especially how much I don't know . I posted this on a web site dedicated to the 1919a4 community so far good I've had a good reception. Here's a couple of pic's and I have some poor quality video with me operating it with one hand holding the camera with the other, it's not a video camera just a still with the short video feature. ( caution UGLY welds)






    There are 4 videos on the page

    http://s81.photobucket.com/albums/j218/dewat/dewat3/

  • #2
    Here's an original, lately I've been thinking it would have been easier to just copy one. Unlike the original, I made mine adjustable for belt width, seating depth and the 3 popular calibers .308, 8MM and the original 30.06.

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    • #3
      Cool,how many can it stuff in a minute?
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        make it motorized.

        "....and you set it, and forget it!" -Ron Paupil

        also, how does it regulate how far in the belt each bullet goes?
        Last edited by Elninio; 04-08-2007, 03:22 PM.

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        • #5
          I timed it once I think it took about 8 to 9 min. for a 250 rd belt. The videos will kinda give you an idea.

          I know a guy who did motorize an original uses a photo cell, if there isn't a round in the right position it won't cycle, but I think I have a big enuff liability problem.

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          • #6
            That's very cool. Another vote for motorization here, but that's just my thing. Nice work.

            -Mark
            The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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            • #7
              Cool... nice looking contraption. I hope you relieved the face of the ram to allow clearance from the primer. I've ran into a few that set proud. I know it's a very slim chance that it may go BANG but it's still a chance I wouldn't want to gamble on. When a minute or so on the lathe could reduce that chance even further.
              Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

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              • #8
                What's the URL for this site?

                Originally posted by dewat
                I posted this on a web site dedicated to the 1919a4 community so far good I've had a good reception.
                Brett Jones...

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                • #9
                  Very nice job, well thought out. What kind of demand is there for a belt loader? Do you plan on going into production?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bhjones
                    What's the URL for this site?
                    http://www.1919a4.com/forums/index.php?
                    The early bird may get the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tinkerer
                      Cool... nice looking contraption. I hope you relieved the face of the ram to allow clearance from the primer. I've ran into a few that set proud. I know it's a very slim chance that it may go BANG but it's still a chance I wouldn't want to gamble on. When a minute or so on the lathe could reduce that chance even further.
                      You're right its probably 1 in a million, but I didn't take the chance, I relieved it.

                      One of the things that took me so long is making jigs and fixtures, I made 'em as I went along, and then wound up not using many of 'em because I'd change the design, but I knew I'd need them if I went into production, as it stands now I'm in semi-production as per demand.

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