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Has anyone made a louver punch?

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  • Has anyone made a louver punch?

    Scratching my head here. I like the looks of louvers on streetrods, but don't know where to get a punch. Has anyone ever built one? would it punch straight in? or? Or roll in? or rock in?
    Any ideal? I want to incorporate it into my english wheel frame.. about 3 tons pressure I think is what the frame is good for..

  • #2
    Go to Metalshapers on Yahoo.

    Within the last year someone showed a louver die they had made. Tool steel, but it worked fine without the hassle of heat treating.

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    • #3
      Forgot to mention....3 tons is marginal for louvering. According to my reference book, 1.2 tons per inch to shear 18ga mild steel, .9 in 20 ga.

      A 3" louver in 18ga would need about 3.6 tons. Add in a little margin for error and I'd guess you'd need at least 5 tons capacity in your frame.

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      • #4
        Ibewegipsy,

        Have a look at

        http://www.hartleige.com/hunton-no2.htm (near the bottom) - it shows a single louvre punch tool. Looks like it needs mounting rigidly in a hydraulic press; a straight push in shears the metal and than forms it.

        HTH,

        Ian
        All of the gear, no idea...

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        • #5
          the shops I've worked in had louver punches. One has made in house, the other bought from the machine tool supplier (Amada). They both looked like regular punch press dies except the male was shaped as the finished louver would be. This is a part punching, part drawing operation.
          gvasale

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          • #6
            Ok... Lemme interject something. My desire is to punch hoods and side panels cheese grater style.
            DO I have to put the die down with the male up? (upside down) I have looked at 3 people sent me and they were all like this. (thanks cause I have never saw one) I want to turn the finish side up to properly align it with a pre-planned pattern. It looks hard enough to punch in rows and columns, without being upside down too. Right now I am thinking fixed laser pointers and other means of alignment. possibly rotating mirrors with two scanned lines.

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            • #7
              See also www.lowbucktools.com/louver.html

              [This message has been edited by Chester (edited 04-16-2003).]

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              • #8
                Ibewgypsie I thought this had to be done on a piece if metal and then added to the vehicle and filled in around the edges with bodyfiller,however doing it in situ is a good idea however what if the panels are not flat what would you do then i.e a curved section? Just interested to know how you would do it.All the top body shops do this regularly ,(I suspect) there would be info somewhere best of luck let us know hoe you do.regards Alistair
                Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                • #9
                  For hand punching the alignment is usually done off the previous louver. With the die down (normal position) it provides a nice flat support surface so the previous louver can be butted up against part of the lower die to establish alignment and spacing. The lower die establishes a minimum spacing distance.

                  Doing them upsidedown is not that much of a problem. The way you suggest would not be practical IMO.


                  <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by ibewgypsie:
                  Ok... Lemme interject something. My desire is to punch hoods and side panels cheese grater style.
                  DO I have to put the die down with the male up? (upside down) I have looked at 3 people sent me and they were all like this. (thanks cause I have never saw one) I want to turn the finish side up to properly align it with a pre-planned pattern. It looks hard enough to punch in rows and columns, without being upside down too. Right now I am thinking fixed laser pointers and other means of alignment. possibly rotating mirrors with two scanned lines.
                  </font>

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                  • #10
                    Hey.. check out that link Alistair.. Rollers.. I can do that.. Cool.. and they posted accurrate drawings.. whoo hoo.. I got plenty of time and little money.
                    Now for some kind of steering device.. I got a I beam w/trolley in the ceiling, can see bucket counterweights coming down to make the weight of the part neutral. Fill them with ice and beer?. perhaps one of them air motors to drive, and I just steer.. Just a little more thought before I start louvering the studebaker hood.
                    I think them rollers would work on curved panels. Cheese grator city.
                    I was always nervous crossing them metal bridges in Florida on a motorcycle. something about the cheese grater effect on skin.

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                    • #11
                      Ibewgypsie if you go to Clearwater you will see a fine bridge a good piece of engineering if ever I saw one lifts and parts in the middle to let all the yachts go by .So dont get nervous when you go over on your bike so long as you don't have too much of the ice cool stuff buddy and get the timing just right you'll be fine just put alittle trust your uncle Alistair
                      Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                      • #12
                        I like the roller idea. I haven't tried it yet--waiting for someone to try out LowBuck's dies. DR is right about a tonnage. Pretty skimpy louvers with only 3 ton capacity. Freight-Liner look is the only way to go!

                        By the way, there's a lot of those cheese grate bridges in Ohio. I guess it lets the snow fall through. I used to cross the one between Akron and Cuyahoga Falls a lot. Couldn't bring myself to look down through the grates and kept a tight grip all the way across. That thing was about 300' above the vally. Yikes!

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                        • #13
                          ibewgypsie:
                          Normally the male part is the top punch. the bottom is the die, and the metal lays flat on it. They can be formed in a compound leverage hand press. There are commerical punch & dies available for turret punches in various sizes. (Amada, Roper-Whitney, Finning)

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                          • #14
                            No Problemo !
                            been there, done that

                            Take a plate (O-1)
                            and mill 3 slots side by side, say 5/8 wide by 3" long with a 5/8" spacing.
                            This is the die plate
                            take a 1/2" dowel pin 2 inches long and mill/grind it to a 1/2 round profile. mill a 1/4" by 2 inch slot in the punch plate and make it 3/16" deep. Now set the dowel in the slot and weld it..that is your punch form--simple.

                            Now mate it to the center slot of the die plate, and line up the cut edge of the half dowel to one edge of the center slot.
                            Now punch the louver and use the other 2 slots for spacing either up or down.
                            The reason the louvers are down , is that is allows you to punch concave (inside) surfaces easier

                            I left out heat treating, because that is a function of how many louvers you want to punch and life expectency

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                            • #15
                              Great.. This sounds easy. I may build both the rollers and the punch today. The advantage of the rollers are that you could make variable width louvers according to design.
                              Raining here today. I got a full day in the shop. Thanks Rich.. Chester..

                              I think the tonnage on the rollers will not be that high, remember it is just the width of the roller edge being pressed and then angular deflection. about a half inch after initial penetration. The bead roller it shows being on is probably only good for 500 pounds deflection. Fitting the rollers to shear instead of bend is probably the worse part.

                              Been in Ohio, I remember leaving across that bridge in cinncinnatti, I got wet in the fog over the river then rode throu the ky, tn in the teens.. I was soo cold.. It was about 3am and nothing was open to warm up in. My leather was wet for weeks. I tattooed in the tri-states area once or twice at motorcycle meets. I was in a nice warm-dry bus with the panhead in the back.


                              [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 04-17-2003).]

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