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My Model Beam Engine

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  • My Model Beam Engine

    I've been a machinist for about 30 years, but I'm just now finding out that it can be an entertaining home hobby. This is my latest project. A Beam Engine built from plans by Elmer Verburg.





    It does run. Here's a link to a short video of it running for the first time. http://www.rake60.com/photogallery/Beam_Running.mpeg

    I know it's pretty simple compared to other engines I've seen on here, and there's a lot of room for improvement in my work, but I do believe I have myself a new hobby here...

    Rick
    Home Model Engine Machinist

  • #2
    Hi Rick

    Well that's a nice little engine, thanks for the video, love it when they run, best is at the slow speed I think

    Great job, thanks for sharing
    Mogens Kilde
    http://m_kilde.skysite.dk/

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    • #3
      Nice work!

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      • #4
        Nicely done! How hard is it doing this stuff at home when you don't have all the toys you had at work to use?? I would think doing things the hard way for the lack of a particular tool would drive me nuts !
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        Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

        It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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        • #5
          Congratulations. Very nice work indeed.

          Here's my version of the same engine...



          As a rank amateur, it makes me feel good to know that a professional machinist thinks this engine was a project worthy of his time.

          My path to building this engine was interesting. I had written a program to calculate all the RT and mill slide manipulations to make tapered spoke flywheels. I needed an exemplar with which to test the program so I used the flywheel from this engine, with no real intention of building the engine itself. However, when done, the flywheel looked so cute, I had to build the engine as a vehicle on which to display the flywheel.
          Regards, Marv

          Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
          http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

          Comment


          • #6
            I'd say your model turned out BEAUTIFULLY!
            I run a CNC turning center for a living, but my homework is all done on simple manual small machines. Why did you make the cylinder round? I couldn't find the brass hex that the plans called for, and didn't want to pay for a foot of that I may never use again.

            As for not having the right tools at home, I have a grinder and a bucket of old broken HSS. There have been times that I spend more time making the tool than cutting with it, but that's a hobby for you. And, I'm an darn easy inspector to please on my own ground.

            Rick
            Home Model Engine Machinist

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            • #7
              Beam Engine

              Very nice indeed. Like you I have been in the trade for 41 years and just two summers ago I built my first steam engine. Photo here:

              http://neme-s.org/Engine_Photos/neme...ect_page_1.htm

              I will have it at NAMES next weekend. Looking forward to the Saturday noon get together.

              Errol Groff
              Preston, CT
              Errol Groff

              New England Model Engineering Society
              http://neme-s.org/

              YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/GroffErrol?feature=mhee

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              • #8
                Thats a neat little engine, cool video too. I just found out that there is a guy who has a shop close to where I live that is really into Stirling and steam engines and has invited me to his shop to see them. Cant wait. He also has a steam boat that he is going to take me out on this summer. With his guidance maybe I can build one of those neato little engines.

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                • #9
                  Excellent work! I'm amazed at the intricate and flawless craftsmanship displayed by members here. How did you fellows make the flywheel, on a rotary table or multi setups and straight XY cuts? And the clevises? WOW. I hope to get a mill soon, BP too big, but I don't want a mini either. With a little more investment, I hope to build me some engines like yours.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Errol Groff
                    Very nice indeed. Like you I have been in the trade for 41 years and just two summers ago I built my first steam engine. Photo here:

                    http://neme-s.org/Engine_Photos/neme...ect_page_1.htm

                    I will have it at NAMES next weekend. Looking forward to the Saturday noon get together.

                    Errol Groff
                    Preston, CT
                    Gorgeous work, Errol. Interesting crank angle, too. Is that based on a full sized engine?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Are those Stirling engines ? which run by a temperature differential.

                      If so I'd love a copy of the plans.....email them to me if you will. My e-mail address is:

                      [email protected]
                      Last edited by chesapeake; 04-13-2007, 12:30 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Beam Engines.....

                        If anyone is travelling thru southern Ontario this summer, stop & see the "Gartshore Beam Engines" used in a water pumping station for many years.
                        A well preserved example of Victorian steam technology & an example of how long this stuff can last. It is a Canadian "National Historic Site" ,iirc; so google it to find out the location. (Welland, Ont. I think, but memory fails me.)

                        One advantage of beam engines was they could work at low pressures, hence lower speeds & stresses in engine parts & boiler. In many respects, the early steam boilers were a design & materials nightmare, even of iron or wood construction. (Yes a wooden pressure vessel...!) The engines often used a wooden walking beam, later cast iron. Leather seals, rings & packings....
                        Newcomen (sp?) & Watt built engines that ran at 2 to 5 psi, and sometimes less than atmospheric....A condensing vacume engine, if you will.
                        Watt realized that coal consumption went down as boiler pressure & temp. increased (better efficiency due to higher delta-T.) Hence the trend to water-tube boilers, triple expansion engines, turbines....faster, higher.
                        If fuel was a waste product, well the point would be moot.
                        The evolution of steam plant.
                        Rick

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Davyboy
                          Excellent work! I'm amazed at the intricate and flawless craftsmanship displayed by members here. How did you fellows make the flywheel, on a rotary table or multi setups and straight XY cuts? And the clevises? WOW. I hope to get a mill soon, BP too big, but I don't want a mini either. With a little more investment, I hope to build me some engines like yours.
                          As I said earlier, my home model shop is all manual. My flywheels are made the old fashioned way.


                          Bolt circles laid out, holes drilled, and the piece rotated around on a pin to match the bore to cut the outer radius of the pockets with an end mill.

                          Rick
                          Home Model Engine Machinist

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Davyboy
                            Excellent work! I'm amazed at the intricate and flawless craftsmanship displayed by members here. How did you fellows make the flywheel, on a rotary table or multi setups and straight XY cuts? And the clevises? WOW. I hope to get a mill soon, BP too big, but I don't want a mini either. With a little more investment, I hope to build me some engines like yours.
                            Tapered spoke flywheels can be made with a single setup on the rotary table. After the holes are drilled at each corner of the triangular pieces that will be removed, the RT must be rotated slightly and translated a bit to bring the side of the spoke parallel to the x-axis.

                            The mathematics required to calculate the rotation and translation are probably beyond the comfort range of most HSMs. That's why I wrote the program (FLYWHEEL) mentioned in my original post. It does all the nasty stuff and produces a data file that can be printed and carried to the shop for reference.

                            The flywheel on my engine was done using this program. In fact, it was the workpiece used to verify that the program was operating correctly.
                            Regards, Marv

                            Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                            http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks Rick for the great photos. That is what I plan to do until I can get a RT for the mill that I don't yet own. Rick, is that a scroll saw? Maybe with a file or abrasive to smooth the scallops from endill? Marv, I downloaded Flywheel . zip today. going to study it closely. Thanks again..
                              Last edited by Davyboy; 04-14-2007, 09:27 AM.

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