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Model donkey pump (pics)

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  • Model donkey pump (pics)

    This is a model of a donkey pump to a design by Elmer Verburg. Donkey pumps were the 1/4

    horsepower motor pumps of the age of steam. They were hung on walls in factories to supply oil

    and water to various pieces of machinery.

    The engine is double acting and, like any good pump, drives the pump piston directly for maximum

    power transfer. The two aluminum cylinders near the bottom contain ball check valves to prevent

    backflow.

    The model pumps mineral oil from the bottom of the plastic cylinder, through the pump, and back

    into the plastic cylinder.

    As a measure of the level of increasing cretinism in our society, I've been asked many times at

    shows (by people oblivious to the pulsating air compressor next to the engine) how the oil makes

    the pump go up and down.


    Regards, Marv

    Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  • #2
    My God, man, you've designed a perpetual motion machine.

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    • #3
      Donkey pumps....

      Marv;
      Nice little pump. Agreed, they were the 1/4 hp motor of the steam era. Even into the 1980's we used steam pumps in the shipyard, usually run on air though. Some were over 60 years old. I should've tried to steal one in my lunch box....
      Too bad about the show-cretins & their stupid questions, though....No accounting for the dullards of the world.
      Nice work, as always.
      Rick

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      • #4
        Your versions of Elmer's engines are a real inspiration to a beginner like me.
        Beautiful craftsmanship!!!
        What others have you made?

        Rick
        Home Model Engine Machinist

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        • #5
          Judging from your work on the beam engine, methinks you don't have much need of inspiration.
          Nevertheless, thanks for the compliment.

          I've built many of Elmer's engines. I just recently got a new camera and have been documenting things I've built for the club to which I belong. Many of those writeups were also passed along to this BBS. Search on my screen name over the last month or two.

          I especially liked Elmer's engines when I was starting out in the hobby. No expensive castings to buy and butcher. If you ruin a part, just grab some more bar stock and start over. Because of the absence of castings, many of his designs are a bit boxy looking but often the mechanical ingenuity of his designs compensates for appearance. I still recommend his designs to newbies from the club who ask me for first engine recommendations.

          Where are you located in Pennsylvania? I grew up in Allentown.
          Regards, Marv

          Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
          http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm from the Punxsutawney area. We don't all lie like our Groundhog did this year...

            The first of Elmer's engines that I built was the mill engine. It runs, but turned out quite sloppy. I made it before I had a mill and my drill press wasn't tight enough to keep the bits from wandering and breaking through.

            Still it was enough to really get me interested in Elmer's designs.
            I've heard he had made plans for a flame licker. I haven't been able to find any plans for it. Do you know if there was such an engine in his books?

            Rick
            Home Model Engine Machinist

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            • #7
              Looks very familiar...



              I don't recall a flame sucker design from Elmer but I may be wrong. I think Jerry Howell has plans for one.
              Regards, Marv

              Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
              http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

              Comment

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