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Do Cruise Ships have machine shops?

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  • Do Cruise Ships have machine shops?

    SWMBO and I are off on a cruise out of San Fran to Cabo next week. I've been looking at the tours they run on board and I see the kitchen, the bridge, the weather center... but no engine room or machine shop tours.

    Do these floating cities even have one? Every Navy ship I've toured has one, and some of them are pretty darn fine.

    Do they not have one because they can't find any machinists in third world countries willing to work for minimum wage on the high seas. How do they fix the food processor if it breaks?

    What gives.

  • #2
    I doubt it, they dont go far,from civilisation or for long.
    And if they they can save a buck they can.
    I will check though.

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    • #3
      I can't say for certain that the cruise ship we took to Alaska had a machine shop, but the evidence of metal stock I saw them loading before we left port seemed to indicate the possibility.
      Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
      ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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      • #4
        They must have. Here is a job listing for a cruise ship machinist.

        Machinist - Salary $2400-2600/month.
        Machining and blueprint reading experience.


        http://www.cruiseshipjob.net/joblistings/

        Keep in mind that cruise ship jobs generally include free room and board.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          We did a cruise from Dover to Norway and beyond last June with Fred Olsen Cruise Lines on the Black Watch, as we headed North in open sea those of us that had a bit of an idea could feel a bit of a vibration throughout the ship that we thought might have been a shaft that needed machining. At Tromso on the way back south, while we were docked for the day an outfit called " Onsite Machining Services" boarded with their gear and the vibration was gone the next time we got up to full speed.
          I am going on a trip to Greenland and Iceland with them next year, departing Newcastle, England 30 August and highly recommend them as a cruising company, of course I have no connection with them, but we are travelling from Australia to sail with them.
          Will

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          • #6
            Last novemeber just after thanksgiving I had the opportunity to do some work on the MS Noordam owned by holland america cruise lines. I work for Carrier Commercial Service servicing commercial chillers. The one chiller on the Noordam had a leak on the sight glass at the back of the motor and needed to be repaired. The repair was going to take longer then the ship was in port so we had to sail with the ship from New York City to St. Thomas. This ship did have a Machining area which consisted of a large lathe about 16 x 72 and a milling machine about 9 x 42. The machines were not american and I did not recognize the make. They also had a welding station and a large horizontal bandsaw. In the time I was on the ship the lathe and mill were not used by anyone. During the course of the repair on the chiller we discovered that the the sight glass was cross threaded and the threads on the motor side were screwed up. The sight glass was a 1" straight pipe thread with an o-ring seal. I spoke to the person in charge of the shop and aked if they had a 1" straight pipe tap and he replied all they had were metric taps. I inquired if there was a machinist who could make me a chasing tap on the lathe and he laughed. Fortunately he had a metric thread file with with pipe tap threads on the the end of the file. 4 hours later the threads were repaired and the new sight glass threaded right in with no problem. I was kind of disappointed with there repair shop, I have seen pictures of members shops on this board that were better equipped and had more talent then the shop on this fairly new ship. I was very impressed with there parts supply room they had every fitting used on the ship spare motors and anything they needed to keep going.

            One of the hydraulic pump motors went bad for the stabilizer and they had a spare one in stock and replaced the motor right away. It appears that the are just like the rest of the world where they feel it is cheaper to just replace the item then try to actually fix it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Evan
              They must have. Here is a job listing for a cruise ship machinist.


              Keep in mind that cruise ship jobs generally include free room and board.
              Not to mention all of the single ladies
              Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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              • #8
                We are cruising to Alaska this August and I inquired as to the availability of engine room tours and the like. I was told that engine room, maintenance areas, crew areas, and bridge tours etc are a thing of the past due to "security issues".

                They told me the only ship tour available is of the kitchen galley, and some lines have discontinued that on as well.

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                • #9
                  I inquired if there was a machinist who could make me a chasing tap on the lathe and he laughed.
                  ...I'm afraid that's a sign of the times...and will only get worse...unfortunately.
                  THAT OLD GANG 'O MINE

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                  • #10
                    I was told that engine room, maintenance areas, crew areas, and bridge tours etc are a thing of the past due to "security issues".
                    ...they don't want you to see the J B WELD that is holding the bottom of the ship on...
                    THAT OLD GANG 'O MINE

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Carl
                      ...they don't want you to see the J B WELD that is holding the bottom of the ship on...
                      Carnival uses chicken wire and concrete,JB weld is too expensive
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Evan
                        Keep in mind that cruise ship jobs generally include free room and board.
                        -Unfortunately, that's not necessarily the case these days. It'll depend on the job (officers are different from stewards and busboys- or temp/summer hire vs. full-time) but most cruise lines deduct meals and accomodations from your paycheck.

                        Or if not, at least as far as meals are concerned, the crew gets a poor excuse for a cramped cafeteria and a meal voucher, but can head 'upstairs' and buy a meal from the guest rooms- but typically only during certain hours.

                        It goes without saying that drinks are not included in anyones pay.

                        I know a fellow that's spent much of the past four years living on a couple of cruise ships- he doesn't even own a house and his car's been in storage for two- and raking in some decent cash as the IT guy (the ships have satellite internet so passengers can send and receive E-mail, they're getting wi-fi systems in place, etc.) but he could fill your head with stories about just precisely how mercenary the cruise lines are.

                        He's got it better than most, having more senority than anyone on board short of the captain and a few of the top officers, but he started out at the bottom of the barrel. I seem to recall him telling us they'd take something like sixty percent (!) of each paycheck to cover accomodations- which was lousy mass-produced cafeteria food, and an eight-foot-square cabin shared with another crewman.

                        There were several decks where they simply were not allowed to go (actually close to 2/3rds of the ship) and the only form of off-duty entertainment they were given (IE, didn't have to pay for, at the same rates the guests did) was satellite TV in a small commons area. (Meaning you watched what everyone else was watching, or you didn't watch it at all.)

                        Doc.
                        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                        • #13
                          Just for grins and giggles, I checked out that web site. It looked like a pseudo employment agency that was teasing readers, like so many other ads. They want a fee upfront, before ANYTHING happens.

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